Seminar Series

EHU Psychology Department Research Seminar Series 2021 – 2022

The Department of Psychology hosts a research seminar series in which we invite colleagues to share their research. These seminars typically run on a Wednesday at 12pm (UK time) in the Law and Psychology Building in room LP 2.49. This is denoted as building 7 on the campus map. This building is accessible and has a lift to all floors. If you have any specific accessibility requirements, please let us know when you register for any given seminar. All talks will last for around 45 minutes, followed by 15 minutes for questions, and 30 minutes for refreshments and socialising with the speaker.

If you’re a student, member of staff or a visitor to Edge Hill, you are very welcome to attend. To attend these, please ensure you register your attendance to any given seminar with our seminar coordinator Dr Gray Atherton at least 24 hours prior to the event.


The Psychology of Romance in the Age of Smartphones

 Dr. Martin Graff, Senior Lecturer at the University of South Wales
Wednesday 3 November 2021
 12pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49

This talk outlines how Smartphones have changed the way we conduct romantic relationships. More and more people meet through dating apps, although it is argued that relationships which start this way are different in many ways to relationships which are initiated face-to-face. Furthermore, in established relationships, Smartphones allow users more frequent contact with relationship partners, or even allow them to engage in surveillance (stalking) of relationship partners or others. Finally, social media can be used to validate the actions of others, which may play an important role in romantic relationships satisfaction. The extent to which each of the above factors impact on romantic relationships and the types of individuals likely to be affected by or engage in such behaviour will be discussed.


Talk Title and Abstract TBC

 Dr. Jamal Mansour, Senior Lecturer at Queen Margaret University
 Wednesday 2 February 2022
 12pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49


Talk Title and Abstract TBC

 Dr. Chris Stiff, Senior Lecturer at Keele University
 Wednesday 2 March 2022
 12pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49


Talk Title and Abstract TBC

 Professor Pam Heaton, Dr. Rory Allen (Professor / Senior Lecturer) at Goldsmiths University
 Wednesday 23 March 2022
 12pm – 2pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49


Money, Media and the British monarchy: who are the Family Firm?

 Dr. Laura Clancy, Lancaster University
 Wednesday 4 May 2022
 12pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49

In recent decades, the global wealth of the rich has soared to leave huge chasms of wealth inequality. Yet the British monarchy is usually ignored in studies on ‘the elites’, positioned as an archaic institution, an anachronism to global corporate forms of wealth and power, and therefore irrelevant.

Brief Biography
Dr Laura Clancy is a Lecturer in Media at Lancaster University, and author of Running the Family Firm: how the monarchy manages its image and our money (2021, Manchester University Press). Her work on monarchy, media, and inequality has been published in journals such as The Sociological ReviewCultural Studies and The European Journal of Cultural Studies. You can follow her on Twitter: @Laura__Clancy.

More information

Drawing on research from her new book, Running the Family Firm: how the monarchy manages its image and our money, Dr Laura Clancy argues how the British monarchy can be understood as a corporation – the Firm – committed to accumulating wealth and reproducing power, alongside other corporate giants like Amazon and Apple. Meanwhile, in media culture we see representations seeking to obscure institutional and corporate power – the Cambridges as an ‘ordinary, middle-class family’, for example, or the Queen as an elderly (great-)grandmother. Dr Laura Clancy argues that these representations of the royal family are a prism; a central ideological project designed to distance the monarchy from capitalist vulgarity and aristocratic debauchery, and reproduce monarchical power by ‘producing consent’ (Hall et al., 1978) for the monarchy in the public imaginary.

Talk Title and Abstract TBC

 Professor Victoria Simms, Professor at Ulster University
 Thursday 9 June 2022
 1pm
Law & Psychology, LP 2.49

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