BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology

  • Study Abroad Option Available
  • Sandwich Year Option Available
  • International Students Can Apply

Overview

UCAS Code:ML93
Course Length:3 Years Full-Time
Start Dates:September 2016, September 2017
Department:Department of Law and Criminology
Location:Edge Hill University
  • Law and Criminology at Edge Hill University ranked in the top two in England for assessment & feedback, organisation & management, and teaching in the National Student Survey 2015;
  • Sociology at Edge Hill University ranked in the top two in the North West for organisation & management in the National Student Survey 2015;
  • Engage in the study of crime, its causes and the role and function of the criminal justice system and gain a sociological perspective or how society works and changes.

This degree enables you to examine perspectives on the causes of crime and violence and the role and function of the criminal justice system, analysing the significance of social status in the provision of justice and rights. You will also study social trends and investigate sociological developments and phenomena in cultural, political and historical contexts, achieved through a focus on the social structures, institutions, orthodoxies, processes, organisations and groups we live our lives within. If you want to gain expertise in the inter-related fields of criminology and sociology, keeping your options open for a wide range of potential careers, then this degree is for you. You will graduate equipped with a variety of transferable skills appropriate to reporting, presenting and working effectively on an individual and collaborative basis.

Student Profiles

  • Sarah-Louise Abbotson

    BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology
    By studying two different subjects together I feel I have expanded my career options, whilst learning a wider variety of topics keeps me intrigued and motivated.
  • Ellis Brennan

    BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology
    I have a genuine admiration and respect for all of my tutors and marvel at their extensive subject knowledge.
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Department of Law and Criminology

Course in Depth

What will I study?

In Year 1 you will be introduced to the core themes of the programmes across the interdisciplinary fields of criminology and sociology. You will study the criminal justice process, criminological and sociological theory, political sociology and cultural studies, as well as examining criminology in the context of a number of case studies of significant changes in society. There is also the opportunity to engage in a number of educational and cultural activities as part of an optional three-day, two-night field trip to London.

Year 2 builds on the broad theoretical knowledge you have gained in criminology and sociology and applies it to a range of contexts. You will study critical criminological theory, armed conflict and political violence, racism, and the relationship between the media and criminal activity, as well as analysing the social construction of sexualities. There is an emphasis on the development of skills that will enhance employability and immerse you in local community activism, with the additional opportunity to undertake archival work and engage with specialist speakers and organisations on an optional field trip to Amsterdam.

Modules in Year 3 bring further depth and specialism to your knowledge and skills, with the research-led curriculum reflecting the cutting edge specialisms of the programme team and the transdisciplinary and international dimensions of criminology and sociology. Contemporary themes are reflected in modules on terrorism, sexual desires, arts in society, as well as the socio-cultural analysis of a particular society and culture. Additional modules immerse you in crimes of the powerful and the politics of policing and imprisonment, while there is also the chance to bring an enhanced international dimension to your studies with an optional field trip to a European city to explore its history, culture, politics and social organisations.

How will I study?

The main forms of course delivery are lectures and workshop seminars, including videos, presentations and small group work. You can choose to build a national and a European field trip into your optional studies. Students will typically be required to attend for three full days per week.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment methods on this degree include the use of portfolios, essays, information retrieval exercises, seminar presentations, case studies, article reviews and examinations. The range of assessments has been creatively designed to encourage the potential of all students.

Who will be teaching me?

Our experienced staff have designed this course and our strong levels of student support ensure your time with us is an enjoyable, rewarding experience, underpinned by the extensive research activity and field experience of our team.

Members of the Department of Law and Criminology and the Department of Social Sciences are at the forefront of teaching, research and publication in a number of areas including desire and sexuality; states, violence and terrorism; cultural and social theories and perspectives; culture and arts in society; crimes of the powerful and the politics of policing and imprisonment; criminology, human rights and social justice; and the criminological imagination.

A Great Study Environment

Law and Criminology Mooting RoomThe stunning £8m Business and Law building provides state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities for students in the Department of Law and Criminology and Business School.

The three-storey building includes a dedicated law and criminology library and a 100-seat lecture theatre. A roof garden and atrium are other attractive features along with modern seminar and meeting rooms and social learning areas which encourage a more informal and interactive style of learning. Elsewhere on campus, there is a mooting room (a mock courtroom) in which students can train and practice their mooting skills.

You are encouraged to join the student-led Edge Hill University Law and Criminology Society which offers a range of activities to enhance your professional development, from mooting workshops to educational visits, mentoring opportunities, a debating society and monthly social events.

Modules

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Year 1

CRI1005 Criminology and the Modern World (20 credits)

Criminology and the Modern World presents you with a number of case studies on substantive topics of current interest and importance. You will undertake a systematic examination of some of the major changes that are occurring and their implications for British society and other societies across the world. Phenomena such as the economic crisis, the environmental crisis, the increasing religiosity of politics and problems in the developing world will be considered in order to foster an understanding of contemporary society and some of the key issues it faces. Aspects of social and criminal justice, harms and rights, and the role that the media plays in shaping social perceptions will be subject to analysis.

CRI1124 Introduction to Criminological Theory (20 credits)

Introduction to Criminological Theory introduces you to key theoretical perspectives relevant to the study of crime and social justice. The module will use contemporary case studies in crime, deviance and conflict to evaluate the main theoretical traditions and recent critiques within criminology, providing a foundation in critical analysis. In particular, the module will emphasise the political underpinnings to theoretical perspectives and will encourage you to recognise the need to locate theories of crime and deviance in their structural contexts.

CRI1125 Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process (20 credits)

Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process introduces you to key aspects of the criminal justice system, primarily in England and Wales but with some reference to other UK and international jurisdictions. The module will critically analyse official responses to ‘crime’ and deviance through an examination of fundamental criminal justice agencies including the police, criminal courts and prisons as well as probation and youth justice services.

SPY1110 Political Sociology (20 credits)

Political Sociology immerses you in the study of power, the state, ideology, authority and domination. You will study the roles, functions and participation of institutions, organisations and groups in the political world, gaining a conceptual model of the way in which the political world operates and engages with powerful interests and demands for democratic participation. A series of lectures will provide a foundation of knowledge and you will then follow particular case studies to exercise that knowledge in depth. These case studies will be drawn from the research specialisms of staff and topical issues. Indicatively, case studies might be security and state surveillance of political participation in Britain, the political management of mass public protest, the political strategies of social movements, the relevance of political parties to contemporary politics, political marketing and media politics.

SPY1111 Thinking Sociologically: Sociological Theory and Applications (20 credits)

Thinking Sociologically: Sociological Theory and Applications introduces you to using the ‘sociological imagination’ to explore a range of sociological concepts and approaches. You will develop the ability to reason effectively about the relation of human agency and social structure, and reflect on the challenges, choices and constraints underlying the assumptions and tacit expectations that determine our view of the world. The module analyses how we create and sustain meaningful social relationships, organisations and systems, and how, in turn, those relations, organisations and systems impact on us.

SPY1112 Introduction to Cultural Studies (20 credits)

Introduction to Cultural Studies provides a foundation for the study of culture in society, with a focus on different – and particularly critical – approaches to the study of the cultural world. The module rehearses relevant cultural theories from traditional conceptions of ‘high’ culture and the importance of culture in society, to critical approaches to culture that take in analyses of power, representation, ideology and hegemony. The module will explore cultural theories and their analyses of popular culture in the last 75 years before applying theoretical insights to the study of cultural forms and movements in Britain since the 1950s. The study of cultural forms will allow for both an appreciation of the tools of cultural analysis and of the richness of cultural practices and representations.

Year 2

CRI2225 Critical Criminological Theory (20 credits)

Critical Criminological Theory provides a grounding in critical criminological theory and its application to contemporary debates and issues concerning harm and criminal justice. The module will familiarise you with the development of criminological theory in historical and political contexts. You will be encouraged to apply theoretical perspectives to issues incorporating harm and crime, as well as social and state responses, drawing on national and international examples. The module will challenge mainstream theories of crime and deviance by locating current examples of harm, criminalisation and criminal justice within determining contexts of class, gender, sexuality, neo-colonialism and age within political priorities of the neoliberal agenda.

SPY2136 States, Conflict and Political Violence (20 credits)

States, Conflict and Political Violence recognises that the sociological study of armed conflict and political violence is an important and growing field of inquiry. Wars and conflicts within and between states are key problems facing the contemporary global community, rooted in the complex character of modern societies. They have been a central concern for sociological theorists since the founding of the discipline.  The study of armed conflict therefore does more than allow you to become familiar with the particular dynamics of specific wars. It also enables a series of key concepts, theories and issues in the social sciences (of power and authority, gender, ethnicity and class) to be investigated and applied to real world situations through the prism of organised violence by, between, against and beyond the state today.

SPY2137 Sexualities: Identities, Politics, Cultures (20 credits)

Sexualities: Identities, Politics, Cultures provides a thorough grounding in the study of sexualities in western democracies, with a focus on the social construction of sexualities in sexual cultures and representations and contemporary issues of sexual politics. Foregrounding an understanding of the historical lineages and conceptual perspectives on understanding sexuality is a critical engagement with sexualities, both through the literature and through direct contact with non-governmental organisations and activists. The module provides an in-depth study of sexual cultures and offers cultural, social and political contextualisation. The terrain for conflicts and contradictions and competing explanations of contemporary sexual lives will be discovered.

You will select one of the following modules:

CRI2023 'Race', Crime and Criminology (20 credits)

‘Race’, Crime and Criminology explores how ideas about ‘race’ help to shape and determine social, judicial and political responses to perpetrators and victims of crime. The module explores the role of race as a major source of social division and aims to show the significance of racism to the reproduction of structural inequalities. You will gain knowledge about patterns of continuity and change in racism and an awareness of the relationship between ethnic and cultural diversity and social and criminal injustice.

CRI2024 Crime, Media and Criminology (20 credits)

Crime, Media and Criminology investigates how the news media plays a primary role in the  construction of social problems, crime, deviance  and, to an extent, reality. The relationship between crime, media and criminology is long established, so this module critically explores the representation of ‘crime’ and criminal activity within various types of media forms incorporating traditional print, online news domains and social media forums. Developing a critical theoretical framework, the module will enable you to examine the criminological and wider societal significance of the production and reproduction of dominant images and discourses around ‘crime’, criminalisation and the construction of victims, perpetrators  and events.

You will select one of the following modules. Alternatively, it may be possible to study both CRI2023 ‘Race’, Crime and Criminology and CRI2024 Crime, Media and Criminology instead of choosing from the options below.

CRI2020 Youth Justice 1 (20 credits)

Youth Justice 1 provides a grounding in issues of youth justice. You will examine the history of youth justice in the UK and elsewhere and consider the development of responses to children and young people in conflict with the law in its social and political context.

CRI2025 Gender, Sex and Violence (20 credits)

Gender, Sex and Violence explores the concept of violence and the various forms it can take. Specifically, the module will focus on the relationships between gender, sex, sexuality and violence, and the ideological, cultural and religious underpinnings of such violent acts. You will be encouraged to look beyond established understandings of what constitutes a violent act to explore more abstract forms of violence such as harm, denial of rights, and poverty. Criminological and social science theory will form the basis of considerations of aspects of violence. The structural relations of class (production), ‘race’ (neo-colonialism) and gender/sexuality (reproduction) will be highlighted as the determining contexts in which such violence occurs and is legitimated. Power, dominance, legitimacy, hegemony and ideology  will be key themes of the module.

CRI2026 Work Experience (20 credits)

Work Experience will develop your employability skills and enhance your career prospects. You will be required to engage in part-time or voluntary work in a criminology or criminal justice related field, as appropriate, to gain experience in a working environment. You will be expected to secure your own work placement, with the support of your work experience tutor.

CRI2027 Crime, Law and Society (20 credits)

Crime, Law and Society explores the application and effect of the criminal law upon individuals in society from criminological and complementary socio-legal perspectives. Through utilising both of these perspectives, you will be encouraged to look beyond established traditional legal explanations for crime and the legal responses to it, in order to explore the wider social, historical, political and theoretical context of the laws relating to crime. The module will enhance your understanding of how determining contexts impact upon how laws relating to crime are created, developed and enforced.

CRI2223 Generating Reputations (20 credits)

Generating Reputations highlights and explores the production of identities, reputations and stereotypes and the impact these have on particular social groups. A key focal point of the module will be the role of the media in shaping reputations and perceptions. You will consider ways in which determining contexts can influence societal perceptions of individuals and groups, as well as the impact of stereotypes, reputations and ‘common sense’ thinking on criminal justice policies and responses.

CRI2224 Violence and Society (20 credits)

Violence and Society explores the concept of violence and the various forms it can take, ranging from intrapersonal violence (e.g. self-harm) to interpersonal violence, institutional and state violence, and violence on a global scale. You will be encouraged to look beyond established understandings of what constitutes a violent act to explore more abstract forms of violence such as harm, denial of rights, and poverty. Criminological theory will form the basis of considerations of aspects of violence. The structural relations of class (production), ‘race’ (neo-colonialism) and gender/sexuality (reproduction) will be highlighted as the determining contexts in which such violence occurs and is legitimated. Power, dominance, legitimacy and hegemony will be the key themes of the module.

CRI2226 Challenging Childhoods (20 credits)

Challenging Childhoods examines the theoretical traditions, and their legacies, of what constitutes the ‘child’. Drawing on historical and theoretical developmental models, both nationally and internationally, you will analyse the various mechanisms through which children are socialised, placed under surveillance, disciplined and in turn criminalised and victimised. Central to the module will be a critical analysis of state intervention into the lives of children, together with an exploration of child exploitation and the process through which children become ‘victims’.  The concept of harm will be of particular significance and this will be juxtaposed and examined in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

You will select one of the following modules:

SPY2127 Work-based Learning and Employability 1 (20 credits)

Work-based Learning and Employability 1 is designed to bridge the world of higher education with the world of work. You will develop a critical understanding of the changing context of work and of social, economic and political factors shaping the labour market and contemporary patterns of employment. There will be an opportunity to apply theory and disciplinary specialist knowledge to practical experience within a work-based setting with students undertaking a 60 hour placement. You will also enhance and develop a range of transferable skills to enhance your employability.

SPY2138 Cultural Analysis in a Global World (20 credits)

Cultural Analysis in a Global World considers how we understand, make sense of and act upon cultural understandings of the globalised world. We are increasingly aware of the interconnectedness of the local, national and global, through cultural and representational forms, commodities and discourses. How do we make sense of them? How do we gain a sense of what is global, what is local, and how do we make comparative and critical examinations of past and present, and begin to speculate on future, on the basis of distinct and contrasting cultural analyses? This module will look at how both media and representational practices make meanings, generate understandings and act upon them in contemporary societies, with a particular focus on recognising the importance of post-colonial cultural critiques and critical discourse analysis as a means of looking below the surface of our globalised world.

SPY2139 Self-Directed Learning (20 credits)

Self-Directed Learning enables you to focus on a particular agreed topic or focus and explore it, with tutorial support, to produce a project-based piece of work which relates to a particular career trajectory. The project will involve addressing a social issue or problem and/or one organisation’s response (voluntary, public or private sector) to a social issue or problem. It will involve not only desk research such as library searches but information retrieval from a range of primary sources. The self-directed learning focus allows for a sense of both leading on the learning taking place and reflecting on its progress, problems and problem-solving.

Language modules in French, Spanish or Mandarin, delivered at the Edge Hill Language Centre, are available to study as an integral part of this degree. A single Language module can be studied instead of one of the optional Criminology or Sociology modules above, however you must study at least one of CRI2023 ‘Race’, Crime and Criminology and CRI2024 Crime, Media and Criminology.

Year 3

SPY3110 Critical Terrorism Studies (20 credits)

Critical Terrorism Studies recognises that in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, and those in London, Madrid, Paris and beyond, terrorism and political violence have become ever more pressing contemporary issues. But, what is ‘terrorism’; what does the term itself actually mean? What causes political violence, how is it represented in modern multi-mediated societies and how does the issue of ‘counter terrorism’ impact on the lives of people today? How has the ‘fear’ of terrorism come to affect our society? These are the sort of questions this module is designed to address. You will be invited to employ and develop your understanding of critical sociological theories, concepts and approaches in order to investigate these matters of great contemporary social importance.

SPY3112 Desire: Law, Politics, Ethics, Difference (20 credits)

Desire: Law, Politics, Ethics, Difference explores the question of how we understand sexual desires, how they shape our identities and relationships and how our practices make erotic, social and cultural meanings for us and others. The module also examines why we permit some sexual pleasures while regulating or prohibiting others and questions what rationales explain how these lines of distinction are drawn in contemporary societies. Whilst law clearly provides a coda of what is regulated or prohibited, it rarely explains why. You will explore these issues, develop a critical sense of enquiry and reconstruct ethical, cultural and political arguments for why society might wish to regulate or prohibit, or perhaps even encourage and celebrate, different desires and pleasures.

You will select two of the following modules. Please note, CRI3022 Crimes of the Powerful 2 can only be chosen in combination with CRI3021 Crimes of the Powerful 1.

CRI3021 Crimes of the Powerful 1 (20 credits)

Crimes of the Powerful 1 traces and explores serious harms and crimes perpetrated by states and associated professional and commercial interests from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth century. Adopting a zemiological frame, the module locates such harms within a range of political forms, particularly during times of social and economic upheaval, and ethnic, national and imperial conflict. The module concludes with a detailed exploration of the origins, implementation, consequences of, and responses to, the extreme state violences of the first half of the twentieth century. The aim is to enable you to critically explore issues at the cutting edge of criminological thinking.

CRI3022 Crimes of the Powerful 2 (20 credits)

Crimes of the Powerful 2 considers the key forms and determinants of serious contemporary harms originating in the actions or omissions of corporations, states and associated powerful organisations after the Second World War. The module critically examines the origins of such harms, the ways in which they are framed within dominant and alternative discourses, and critiques the responses to them. The module takes an expansive view of harm, drawing upon examples from within and without the criminal justice system, at local, national and international levels.

CRI3109 The Politics of Policing (20 credits)

The Politics of Policing equips you with a critical knowledge and understanding of the concept of policing, both in its philosophical sense and as a function of the modern liberal democratic state. The module will consider the role and function of the police service, and explore related issues including police powers, political accountability, protection of civil liberties and the concept of equality before the law. Contemporary strategies and approaches to policing will be located within their structural, political, social and geographical contexts. The module is underpinned by theories of authority, power and legitimacy.

CRI3110 The Politics of Imprisonment (20 credits)

The Politics of Imprisonment provides you with a critical knowledge and understanding of the nature, functions and justifications for the use of punishment, specifically incarceration, in modern society. The module will consider the philosophical theories that are used to legitimise the state’s use of imprisonment and the sociological theories that explain historical developments in the purpose of state punishment. The various divisions and functions of the prison estate will be examined within their historical, structural, political, social and geographical contexts. Related methods of state punishment, such as the death penalty, will also be considered. You will adopt an international perspective and explore penal theory and practice in a range of countries. The relationships between power, legitimacy and justice will be central themes throughout the module.

You will select one of the following modules. Alternatively, it may be possible to study a further module from the above four options instead of choosing from the modules below.

CRI3023 Crime and Place (20 credits)

Crime and Place enables you to build your knowledge and understanding of the relationships between crime and place and examine developments in policy relating to place, criminality and safety. The module appraises the strengths and weaknesses of different theoretical, philosophical and practical approaches to crime and place. Geographies/landscapes of crime and criminalisation are examined utilising empirical and theoretical materials.

CRI3024 Criminology and Philosophy (20 credits)

Criminology and Philosophy recognises how criminology has long drawn on philosophy to inform its development. You will consider philosophical ideas and concepts as they relate to the study of crime and its control. The module considers debates concerning continental and analytic philosophy and how these are reflected in criminology through discussions concerning qualitative and quantitative approaches, and between critical/sociological criminology and administrative criminology/crime science. You will assess a range of key philosophical ideas and concepts that relate to criminology, with a particular focus on how we get on with one another and what happens when we do not.

CRI3112 Justice, Rights and the State (20 credits)

Justice, Rights and the State examines the development of the discourse about rights and justice. Taking a national and international approach, the module will consider the development of rights historically and the new discourses of rights. You will evaluate statutory policies and responses to the issue of rights and justice and consider how states respond to issues of justice and rights, including where states themselves uphold or violate citizen’s rights.

CRI3113 Expanding the Criminological Imagination (20 credits)

Expanding the Criminological Imagination critically reflects upon and analyses the discipline of criminology. You will examine criminology’s political, practical and theoretical strengths and limitations and explore the production and commodification of criminological knowledge. The module will consider whether criminology has become a ‘parasitic’ discipline with the criminalisation of social problems, and the ever increasing techniques of crime control, forming the justification for the discipline’s existence, rather than providing a platform for resistance. You will explore the concept of the ‘criminological imagination’ as an alternative way of envisaging the discipline and its utility. You will also examine the way in which criminology has to connect with other disciplines in order to expand the range of issues it deals with. This is a necessity in order to help criminologists make sense of issues where the ‘normal’ boundaries of criminology would stifle or limit an analysis.

You will select one of the following modules:

SPY3101 Self-Directed Study (20 credits)

Self-Directed Study enables you to look in depth at a theme or issue covered over the duration of your programme of study. The module involves identifying a chosen area for study, developing and negotiating a learning contract (which will outline the what, how, when, where and why of the study period), as well as the means of assessment to showcase the acquired learning. You will be assigned a module supervisor who will help you to develop the negotiated learning and agree the nature of the assessment.

SPY3109 Arts in Society (20 credits)

Arts in Society focuses upon the way that a range of feminist and community-based artists work with specific communities and the general public in order to address social issues. The module enables you to explore and develop notions of social justice and community engagement through innovative and creative means. In its examination of the ways in which the arts can ameliorate social conditions, it raises philosophical, ethical and practical issues. You will have the opportunity to learn about a range of artists and practices and the resonance these have with the social issues that are meaningful to them and their study. You will be encouraged to think creatively and reflectively and be expected to engage with works of art as well as with critical literature.

SPY3111 Social, Cultural and Political Ideas (20 credits)

Social, Cultural and Political Ideas enables you to undertake focused work on trans-disciplinary theoretical studies that combine social, political and cultural dimensions in order to understand issues and problems in the contemporary world. The module provides a discursive base on the relationship of theory to practice and the critical study of ideas before focusing on three particular issues and/or theoretical positions and perspectives. Topics might include democracy and democratisation, neo-liberalism, models of justice, consumerism, governance and globalism, cultural Marxism, Orientalism, post-colonialism, or post-Marxism. The balance of generality with specific focus allows for a detailed and critical approach to social, political and cultural ideas.

SPY3125 Socio-Cultural Issues and Questions (20 credits)

Socio-Cultural Issues and Questions provides you with the opportunity to intensively study a particular society and culture through some of its contemporary issues. The module allows for the comparative cultural analysis of a different society to the one you live in, focused around some preparatory lectures and reflective sessions and an intensive study trip to that country. The focus of the study trip will be to explore both comparisons and contrasts, and use the experience of difference to explore social and cultural issues and problems.

If you studied a Language module in Year 2, you may wish to study a further Language module in Year 3. This would form an integral part of your degree in place of either CRI3023 Crime and Place, CRI3024 Criminology and Philosophy, CRI3112 Justice, Rights and the State, CRI3113 Expanding the Criminological Imagination or one of the optional Sociology modules above.

Optional modules provide an element of choice within the programme curriculum. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by timetabling requirements.

Disclaimer

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of our published course information, however our programmes are subject to ongoing review and development. Changing circumstances may necessitate alteration to, or the cancellation of, courses.

Changes may be necessary to comply with the requirements of accrediting bodies, revisions to subject benchmarks statements, to keep courses updated and contemporary, or as a result of student feedback. We reserve the right to make variations if we consider such action to be necessary or in the best interests of students.

Entry Criteria

Entry Requirements

The UCAS Tariff system, which allocates points to a range of qualifications in university entry requirements, is changing for students joining programmes from September 2017 onwards.

The entry criteria below are mapped to the current UCAS Tariff for academic year 2016/17 entry and the new UCAS Tariff for academic year 2017/18 entry.

  • 2016/17 Entry – 280 UCAS Tariff points. No specific subjects are required;
  • 2017/18 Entry – 112 UCAS Tariff points. No specific subjects are required.

Example Offers

Some typical examples of how you can achieve the required number of UCAS Tariff points are detailed below.

  • A Levels – BBC;
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (or combination of BTEC QCF qualifications) – Distinction, Merit, Merit (DMM);
  • Access to Higher Education Diploma – successful completion of Diploma to include at least 45 passed credits at Level 3.

Please note, the above examples may differ from actual offers made. A combination of A Level and BTEC awards may also be accepted.

As long as you have a minimum of two A Levels (or equivalent), there is no maximum number of qualifications that we will accept UCAS points from. This includes additional qualifications such as the Welsh Baccalaureate and Certificate of Personal Effectiveness (CoPE), AS Levels that haven’t been continued to A Level, and General Studies AS or A Level awards.

For further information on how you can meet the entry requirements, including details of alternative qualifications, please visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/offers.

EU students can get country-specific information about the University’s entry requirements and equivalent national qualifications at www.edgehill.ac.uk/eu.

International students should visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/international for information on the entry criteria for overseas applicants.

Recognition of Prior Learning

Edge Hill University recognises learning gained elsewhere, whether through academic credit and qualifications acquired from other relevant courses of study or through recognition of an individual’s professional and employment experience (also referred to as ‘experiential learning’).

Previous learning that is recognised in this way may be used towards meeting the entry requirements for a programme and/or for exemption from part of a programme. It is your responsibility to make a claim for recognition of prior learning. For guidance, please consult the University’s Recognition of Prior Learning Policy and contact the faculty in which you are interested in studying.

Career Prospects

What are my career prospects?

Typical careers for Criminology and Sociology graduates include working in education, social work, youth and community work, probation service, youth justice services, criminal justice agencies, care and resettlement of offenders, welfare rights, outreach work with vulnerable groups, and voluntary sector and international aid work. Alternatively, you may wish to progress to further study or research in Criminology or Sociology.

How can I enhance my employability?

It is useful to consider, even before you apply, how you will spend your time while studying and make the most of your university experience.

Optional, additional activities may be available on this degree which could help to prepare you for a stimulating and rewarding career. These include:

  • Sandwich Year – you may have the opportunity to apply to complete a sandwich year placement as part of your programme (usually the third year of a four year degree) and gain highly relevant work experience;
  • Study Abroad – you may have the opportunity to apply to spend an additional year (usually the third year of a four year degree) studying or working abroad;
  • Language Learning – you may be able to select language modules in French, Spanish or Mandarin, delivered at the Edge Hill Language Centre, as an integral part of your degree (for which you will gain academic credits). Alternatively, it may be possible to select the language modules as additional study.

Please note, the availability of these additional activities cannot be guaranteed for all students. Depending on availability and the number of students wanting to participate, there may be a competitive application process for sandwich year placements or study abroad opportunities or you may be required to secure a relevant placement yourself.

Finance

Tuition Fees

Tuition fees for full-time study on this undergraduate degree are £9,000 per annum for UK and EU students and £11,350 per annum for international students enrolling on the programme in academic year 2016/17.

Financial Support

Subject to eligibility, UK and EU students can apply for a Tuition Fee Loan from the Government to cover the full cost of tuition fees. UK students may also be eligible to apply for additional funding to help with living costs.

For comprehensive information about the financial support available to eligible UK and EU students joining this programme in academic year 2016/17, together with details of how to apply for funding, please view our Money Matters 2016/17 guide at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradfinance2016.

Financial support information for international students can be found at www.edgehill.ac.uk/international/fees.

Scholarships

ScholarshipsEdge Hill University offers a range of scholarships with a competitive application process for prospective full-time undergraduate students. These scholarships aren’t linked to academic success and celebrate determination, talent and achievement beyond your coursework, for instance in creativity, enterprise, ICT, performance, sport or volunteering.

Additional scholarships, which you may qualify to receive, reward outstanding grades and are available to eligible UK and EU students.

To find out more about scholarships, to assess your eligibility, and to meet some of our dedicated scholarship winners, visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/scholarships.

Apply

How to Apply

Apply online through UCAS at www.ucas.com.

Visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/applyucas to find out more about the application process.

Should you accept an offer of a place to study with us and formally enrol as a student, you will be subject to the provisions of the regulations, rules, codes, conditions and policies which apply to our students. These are available at www.edgehill.ac.uk/studentterms.

Visit Us

If you are considering applying to study at Edge Hill University, the best way to gain an insight into student life is to discover our stunning campus for yourself by attending an open day. You can view dates and book your place at www.edgehill.ac.uk/bookanopenday.

Alternatively, if you are unable to attend an open day, you can find out more about all of our events for prospective undergraduate students, including monthly campus tours, at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradevents.

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to explore our full range of degrees before you apply, you can order an undergraduate prospectus at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradprospectus.

Get in Touch

If you have any questions about this programme or what it’s like to study at Edge Hill University, please contact:

International students should visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/international or email international@edgehill.ac.uk with any queries about overseas study.

  • Book an Open Day
  • Request a Prospectus
  • Enquire Online
  • Live Chat
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Course Changes

This page outlines any material changes to course content, programme structure, assessment methods, entry criteria, and modes of study or delivery, implemented since 1st September 2015.

9th June 2016 - New Module Added

A Language module is now available as a Year 3 option, providing a Language module was studied in Year 2.

24th May 2016 - Change of Modules

Although the broad themes of the programme remain largely the same, all previous modules have been replaced with a suite of new modules. This new programme structure is being implemented from September 2016 entry.

There is also now the option of selecting a Language module in French, Spanish or Mandarin as an integral part of this degree in Year 2.