Podcast: What You Can Expect At Open Day

The clock is ticking, the countdown continues its inexorable progress, the midnight hour rapidly approaches. We could be talking about the start of the World Cup in Russia.

Or the moment we officially break from the European Union. Or even the day we have to admit smart fridges may be a good idea. But we’re not. It’s bigger than any of those things. Probably. It’s Edge Hill’s summer Open Day.

And why is that big deal?

Mostly because it’s important to find out more about the place in which you may spend the next three years of your life. Just ask Edge Hill Computing student Sean Murphy:

“I recommend seeing as many universities as possible, but make sure Edge Hill is on your list. I promise that no university will compare to the friendly staff, amazing campus and brilliant people you will meet at Edge Hill. If you don’t believe me then come and see for yourself.”

To whet your appetite further, we chatted to a few lecturers about what to expect at an Edge Hill Open Day, and why Edge Hill could be the perfect place for you to study:

Book your place at our Open Day on Saturday 16th June, and claim your free Open Day ice cream (legal note: must be collected in person).

Liverpool Sound City 2018: The Review pt2

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Creative Writing student Lucy Barrett took advantage of a free ticket to Sound City, courtesy of EHU, to get a sneak preview of the UK music scene’s future chart-toppers. “I always think it’s best to tell a story when it’s fresh in your mind; so, I’m sat on the platform of Liverpool Central ready to come home after a culture-shocking day, poised with a notepad and pen. “I hadn’t been to Sound City before, but from what everyone’s been telling me, the aesthetic seemed much different this time around. This year SC was held in the Baltic Triangle and Cains Brewery district, scattered throughout quirky bars and venues – really representing the regeneration that the area has undergone in the last decade. It was a refreshing change to go somewhere in Liverpool that wasn’t strictly touristy. And although I got lost more times than I could count, it’s a great place to be lost because I always found something more exciting. “24 Kitchen Street has an original, quirky vibe that I’d never gotten from a venue before; I’m not sure if it was from the vibrant graffiti glittering the outside walls or the intimate plainness on the inside. A perfect place for The Label Recordings Takeover, methinks, hosting relatively unknown, but fantastically eclectic and talented acts. Despite being a summery, sweaty day, there was a consistently impressive crowd throughout. I purposely didn’t want to know much about the artists before I saw them (yes, I know that’s a bit weird, but I didn’t want pre-set expectations), and I definitely stand by this. “The stage was kicked off by Liverpool-based indie-rock band, AZTEX, combining sultry vocals and provocative lyrics, particularly on one of their latest singles, ‘Promise’, with a mesmerising beat that echoes through you long after it’s finished. Next was Ceemax (top), a grime artist whose music transcends this descriptive pigeon-hole, and I spotted a good few spectators starting to dance. My bar was set high after the first act, but he smashed it with a fantastically fresh sound, a visual spectacle with featured dancers, and an edgy duet with The Voice’s Holly Ellison.
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Oranj Son (above) were the last Label Recordings act to take the stage, and what a way to end the takeover. The indie-rock band, who were somewhat reminiscent of The Smiths (one of my favourites), emerged on stage with smooth 80s-inspired melodies, drawing a particularly large crowd.
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“I snuck away from Kitchen Street and headed for a beer and a surprisingly reasonably-priced gourmet burger and headed to the much bigger (and more crammed) Camp and Furnace [Cramp and Furnace? – Lame Pun Editor], awaiting the Stealing Sheep (above) Suffragette Tribute. Even though I was acquainted with the wonderful weirdness of the trio, I was still overwhelmed by them! Not crammed onto a stage, the massive cast of talented musicians and dancers flooded into the audience, with fantastical, bright outfits, sometimes with a Pussy Riot vibe, a perfectly fitting tribute for the centenary of the women’s vote, methinks. It was an aural and visual feast. I, and a horde of others, followed the ensemble in a procession down the street, grabbing snacks and watching all the unaware people sat in bars looking on in bemusement. Of course, there was a host of drunks heckling the dancers, but they gracefully continued unabashed. The procession reached its destination, the Blade Factory, with the crowd spilling halfway out the building, and I was stood so far back I was on my tip-toes trying to catch a glimpse. “My train has just pulled up to the platform, drawing the Saturday of Sound City 2018 to a close, and I’m already excited about going back next year, as I can imagine it won’t be at all the same.”

Liverpool Sound City 2018: The Review pt1

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“Liverpool is the centre of the music world,” contends Sociology with Politics student Amos Wynn, who covered the festival for Edge Hill. “The city has produced bands like The Beatles, The La’s and The Wombats, and continues to see new artists coming through.” Here’s his round-up of Sound City, Liverpool’s annual musical beanfeast.   Liverpool Sound City is a great opportunity to see the future of the city’s music scene in action, as well as many more great acts from across the world. Headlining the event are the likes of DMA’s, Peace and The Night Cafe. Friday was the Sound City+ conference, taking place at Liverpool’s historic Cunard building. This event offered various opportunities to gain an insight into the music industry. It certainly set the tone for the following days of music and offered advice to anyone wanting to appear there in years to come, with plenty of stalls dotted around the room where people could talk to industry experts. One person I spoke to was from a musicians’ charity, Help Musicians UK. Their role is to help any upcoming or retired artists who rely on music for their income. They could be integral for anyone looking to forge a full-time career in music.
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The day also had a range of guest speakers, talking about personal experiences and giving excellent advice. One speaker, who works for a music label, spoke about what labels (Sub Pop) are looking for in emerging artists. The first thing is, of course, the music itself. He also believes they are after songs that are ‘personable,’ which can have different meanings. A must-see for me was Alan McGee [above, in conversation with journalist and singer/bassist in The Membranes, John Robb], founder of Creation Records and the man responsible for discovering Oasis. He spoke of his own time in bands and how Creation came about. Listening to someone with as many stories as him was a great insight into life working at a record label. He said he “never realised [Oasis] were such a great band.” For me the aim was to gain some advice on entering the music scene from a journalistic perspective. The different people I spoke to all gave the same advice: to write as much as possible practice technique, with plenty of blogs and websites looking for writers. Another set of advice was to read as much as possible. As well as reading stuff in my own genre, it’s important to read a range of literature. That would develop my writing skills and show different ways of writing. It’s also important to impose ideas and have clear, concise opinions. The Sound City conference was an interesting and excellent event to attend.
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The festival itself was superb. With the sun shining down on the Baltic Triangle, the scene was set for an excellent weekend of music. Walking round you wouldn’t think it was the kind of place to host a music festival, but the choice of venue was an inspired choice. On Saturday night DMA’S headlined Camp and Furnace. The three-piece put on a wonderful performance with their Britpop-sounding songs; not bad for a band from Australia. Also, on Saturday Liverpool band SPINN impressed at District.
“We are SPINN, and you’ve been spunn,” were the words of band frontman Jonny Quinn, upon leaving the stage.  
He wasn’t wrong. With catchy indie songs, constant changes of sunglasses, and chucking water into the crowd, it made for an entertaining 20 minutes. It was same again on Sunday, with the sun shining once again. The two stand out acts that day both came from Liverpool.
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Paris Youth Foundation (above) and Night Cafe (below) were exceptional. Both mustered up a great atmosphere with Camp and Furnace bouncing.
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Sound City was a truly wonderful event, and I’m already looking forward to next year. My top ten acts: 1.      The Night Café (Camp and Furnace) 2.      DMA’S (Camp and Furnace) 3.      Paris Youth Foundation (Camp and Furnace) 4.      Picture This (Hangar 34) 5.      SPINN (District) 6.      Peace (Camp and Furnace) 7.      Neon Waltz (Camp and Furnace, lead pic)) 8.      No Hot Ashes (District) 9.      Little Thief (Brick Street) 10.    Novustory (Brick Street)

Podcast: My Eurovision Life

  Phil Jackson, Programme Leader for BA Media, Music and Sound, has come a long way since his first Eurovision Song Contest in 1976, watching the UK’s Brotherhood of Man scoop the title. Since that fateful night he has been an avid follower, and now combines his passion with his academic research. In this podcast he discusses the history of the event which began life in 1956 with just seven competing nations (over 40 countries now compete, with 16 appearing in the grand final). It now transcends it’s European boundaries, with Australia and Israel invited to the party. He also tells us about his own intimate relationship with the event, revealing some of his personal highlights, and the place the event holds in the European psyche.   Listen to Phil’s podcast here

Funding provides behind the scenes glimpse at film industry

 

A group of Film and Television Production students got first-hand experience of working at a European film festival thanks to the Edge Hill Student Opportunity Fund.

Four second and third year students attended the Thessaloniki Film Festival in Greece to develop behind the scenes knowledge of a film festival by volunteering, attending masterclasses, concerts and exhibitions and the European professional industry pitching forums.

The group were able to attend the renowned festival and enhance their CVs following a successful bid to the Student Opportunity Fund which covered the cost of attending.

Third year student Shelby Keating (20) from Manchester travelled to the festival and took part as a volunteer.

She said: “I went to the Thessaloniki Film Festival because I anticipated that it would be greatly beneficial for my career, however I also thought it would be a very fun and entertaining adventure and be very interesting to see and learn how these sort of things work in the real world.

“Whilst at the festival I learnt many things, I learnt that the industry isn’t as ‘scary’ as it seems, and that with film and television it is all about who you know and about networking which we were all able to do successfully at the festival.

“It also opened my eyes to how to industry really works, and made me realise that it isn’t as hard as it seems to get to that place – and  it was also great to find that the directors are very open to talking and networking with students and young filmmakers like ourselves.”

Yiannis Koufonikos, lecturer in Film and TV production added: “This was a great opportunity which allowed students to experience the setup of one of the main documentary film festivals in the world. They had the chance to make connections with filmmakers and industry contacts and experience sessions with acclaimed industry organisations. During the festival the students completed a reflective journal which was shared with others on their return to Edge Hill.”

The Student Opportunity Fund enables students to take advantage of career enhancing and life changing opportunities.

The fund ensures that costs are not a barrier to students making the most of their experience at Edge Hill. It allows undergraduate students to apply for up to £2,000 which can help towards the cost of activities designed to prepare them for the future and enhance their employability skills.

Students from all departments have been awarded funding for a range of activities from interning overseas at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in America and the Computational Biology Department in Tokyo, to placements at the BBC and volunteering with local charities.

Find out more here.

Funding provides behind the scenes glimpse at film industry

 

A group of Film and Television Production students got first-hand experience of working at a European film festival thanks to the Edge Hill Student Opportunity Fund.

Four second and third year students attended the Thessaloniki Film Festival in Greece to develop behind the scenes knowledge of a film festival by volunteering, attending masterclasses, concerts and exhibitions and the European professional industry pitching forums.

The group were able to attend the renowned festival and enhance their CVs following a successful bid to the Student Opportunity Fund which covered the cost of attending.

Third year student Shelby Keating (20) from Manchester travelled to the festival and took part as a volunteer.

She said: “I went to the Thessaloniki Film Festival because I anticipated that it would be greatly beneficial for my career, however I also thought it would be a very fun and entertaining adventure and be very interesting to see and learn how these sort of things work in the real world.

“Whilst at the festival I learnt many things, I learnt that the industry isn’t as ‘scary’ as it seems, and that with film and television it is all about who you know and about networking which we were all able to do successfully at the festival.

“It also opened my eyes to how to industry really works, and made me realise that it isn’t as hard as it seems to get to that place – and  it was also great to find that the directors are very open to talking and networking with students and young filmmakers like ourselves.”

Yiannis Koufonikos, lecturer in Film and TV production added: “This was a great opportunity which allowed students to experience the setup of one of the main documentary film festivals in the world. They had the chance to make connections with filmmakers and industry contacts and experience sessions with acclaimed industry organisations. During the festival the students completed a reflective journal which was shared with others on their return to Edge Hill.”

The Student Opportunity Fund enables students to take advantage of career enhancing and life changing opportunities.

The fund ensures that costs are not a barrier to students making the most of their experience at Edge Hill. It allows undergraduate students to apply for up to £2,000 which can help towards the cost of activities designed to prepare them for the future and enhance their employability skills.

Students from all departments have been awarded funding for a range of activities from interning overseas at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in America and the Computational Biology Department in Tokyo, to placements at the BBC and volunteering with local charities.

Find out more here.

Festival in a Day – 21 March 2018


Welcome to the Department of Media’s Festival in a Day!

WEDNESDAY 21 MARCH 2018
IN CREATIVE EDGE FROM 10.00am

 The aim of our Festival in a Day is to bring together a range of speakers from across the creative industries. It gives you the opportunity to listen to inspiring speakers, and celebrate the success of our graduates. You can also network with the speakers and get some tips on how to make it in the creative industries when you graduate.

Enjoy, and be inspired!

SESSION 1 – WORKSHOPS AND MASTERCLASSES

 

10.00 – 11.00am and 11.00 – 12.00pm.
CE Multi-Purpose Studio

Debra Hargreaves – The Magic of Make-Up
Debra Hargreaves has worked as a make-up artist with everyone from Jerry Hall, Ronnie Corbett, and Jonathan Ross and worked for many years on Children in Need. As a regular make-up artist on Hollyoaks, Coronation Street and Emmerdale Debra will be discussing the importance of make up when filming and will offer a step-by-step guide on how to achieve studio ready make up on a model under the studio lights.

Please Note: this session will run twice at 10.00am and 11.00am – 30 people maximum per session


10.00 – 11.00am (Animation Students Only) and 11.00 – 12.00pm
CE Animation Studio (CE 002)

Matt Smith – Animation Masterclass
Matt Smith is a specialist 3D CGI Animator, Designer and Artist; having worked for such companies as Sony. He is currently undertaking a project to re-create the lost sculpture of the Italian Futurist sculptor Boccioni titled Spiral Expansion of Muscles in Movement (or Spiral Expansion of Muscles in Action). To undertake this project Matt is using CGI, 3D scanning, modeling, and printing in order to re-create this lost sculpture. The CGI animation processes Matt has been using is truly fascinating. Come to the session to find out about, aspects of the Animation industry, such as 3D scanning, modeling, and printing by way of Matt showing you the project he has developed.’

Please Note: this session will run twice at 10.00am (Animation students only) and 11.00am for all other Media students – limited seating


11.00 – 12.00pm
CE203

BBC CV and Freelancer Workshop – get that entry-level role in TV!
Come along and let the BBC talent Team guide you in all things CV. You will leave this session armed with all the knowledge you need to produce CVs that lead to interviews. With advice from Abi Caitlin who works at the Talent Department at the BBC so knows exactly what you need to be putting on those all-important applications. Also in the session, Joy Monks has worked a freelance script supervisor and TV production manager for over twenty years.


11.00 – 12.00pm
CE206

Postgraduate Study at Edge Hill
So you are interested in postgraduate study? Rachel Buckley and Andrea Wright will give you an overview of what courses are available, what you need to do to apply and tell you about funding and bursaries. This session is designed for any students interested in pursuing a postgraduate degree at Edge Hill, so come along with all your questions and queries.


12.00 – 1.00pm
CE203

Application Forms Made Easy
If filling out application forms for jobs, courses or placements fills you with dread-fear no more. Let the Edge Hill Careers team offer you hints, tips and approaches to take the aggro out of applications.



All sessions in Creative Edge Lecture Theatre (CE 017)
SESSION 2 – INDUSTRY SPEAKERS

 2.00pm

Festival in a Day opening address from Professor Matthew Pateman, Head of Media


 2.15pm – 3.00 PM

Nazia Mogra – BBC Producer and Journalist
Nazia Mogra is a TV Journalist, Presenter and Producer. She graduated from Edge Hill’s Media department with a First Class degree in Journalism in 2006. From humble beginnings volunteering at her local community radio station to working on local and national radio  and newspapers. She’s worked for the BBC for more than a decade presenting for some of the biggest TV news shows. From BBC World to BBC Sport, and BBC North West Tonight to Newsround. From reporting live outside Downing Street watching history being made as the Prime Minister stood down to travelling across Europe reporting on the referendum. Interviewing heads of huge companies IBM and Microsoft to sporting stars to Bollywood actors to Arab royalty and popstars. Nazia is a published author and has featured in an official Liverpool Football Club book about the clubs Asian fans. Nazia has a passion for bringing to the forefront stories from different communities. Her motto embrace your individuality it’s what makes you stand out from the crowd! Followed by Q&A


3.00 – 3.15pm BREAK – refreshments in the foyer


3.15 – 4.00pm

Dave Skinner – definition of a Director
Dave Skinner is a multi-camera director who has worked his way through numerous positions including assistant floor manager, assistant director, production coordinator, single camera director, edit producer, series producer and executive producer. Dave has worked for terrestrial and digital broadcasters and has worked on The BAFTA Awards, Fame Academy, Sunday Brunch, The Jonathan Ross show and Celebrity Big brother. Most recently he has directed Sam and Mark’s Big Friday Wind-Up for the BBC. This session is an absolute must for anyone interested in a career in television. Followed by Q&A


4.00pm – 4.45pm

Alumni Superstar Panel
Secrets to breaking into the Film & TV Industries

 Be inspired by EHU Media Graduates who have carved out amazing careers in the worlds of Film, television, and animation. Get hints and tips from our alumni. If they can do it, so can you!

Alumni guests include:

Matt Owen from BBC Sport
Simon Robertson from ITV
Ellie Sergison from Redolution.


SESSION 3 – LET’S GET SOCIAL!

 4.45pm – 5.15pm

Screening of Student Work
We proudly present some highlights of student films, including the winner of our annual prize for film of the year, the Paul Cannon Memorial Prize, and films and animation recently nominated for an RTS award (Royal Television Society). Be inspired by the talented students and the work they have created.

Includes the RTS award-winning Peregrine The Pathetic.


 5.15pm – 5.45pm

The Great Creative Egg Hunt
Will it be you? Will you find one of the elusive golden eggs and one of our amazing prizes and exciting work placement opportunities? Make sure you attend the earlier sessions to get your golden ticket to be eligible for the Easter egg hunt!


From 5.45pm The Network Disco in the Creative Edge foyer

An opportunity to network with many of the afternoons speakers, enjoy refreshments and great music in Foyer. Dance around those business cards and make sure you leave with some contacts as well as some complementary food!


ALSO

THE EGG HUNT
The Work Placement Raffle

Receive a raffle ticket for every session you attend at FiaD and you could win an eggstremely eggciting prize!

  • A placement at ITV
  • A placement at the Liverpool Film Office
  • A placement at Foot In The Door films
  • A placement at Redolution

 

CAREERS ROADSHOW

Come and celebrate some festive cheer with the Careers Centre. Win Amazon vouchers, meet the team and grab yourself a freebie!


 

Animation student scoops prestigious RTS award

L-R Animation lecturer Alex Jukes and Peter Miller. Credit: Claire Harrison photography.

Edge Hill Animation student Peter Miller has won the Royal Television Society (RTS) North West Student Award for Animation.

Peter’s film Peregrine the Pathetic was one of three pieces of Edge Hill student work shortlisted at this year’s awards ceremony, which took place at on 12th March at Salford’s Lowry Theatre.

The film will now be entered into the national RTS Student Awards, with winners announced later this year.

On accepting his award, Peter said: “I must give my thanks to the tutors and students at Edge Hill for making me feel so welcome, and also my co-writer Thomas Richard. I want to give my love and support to all the animation students at Edge Hill – go team EHU!”

When Peter learned of his shortlisting, he said: “It feels surreal to know that my film is being recognized by a society as renowned as the RTS, all the hard work really has paid off.

“The film took me a whole year to complete, which included writing the screenplay over the summer. The idea for my film was heavily inspired by the Monty Python film ‘Life of Brian’ in which the main character is mistaken as the true messiah. That and the film’s humour was something that I really wanted to bring to my animation because I have a huge admiration for British comedy.”

Edge Hill student work Nueva Vida by Yotam Berant, Aidan Alexander, George Rough, Harry Holiday and Isabella Castaneda was shortlisted in the TV Factual category and Pegs by Laura Stokes, Anna Dye, Alisha Gibbons, Hannah Rzepkowski, Charlee Mackey and Ellie Carroll in the TV Short Feature category.

Find out more about studying animation at Edge Hill here.

Television Production Management student joins BBC talent pool

 student Rhiannon Lawrence A Television Production Management student has been offered a place on the BBCs prestigious talent pool.

Following a rigorous interview process at Media City, third year student Rhiannon Lawrence received the news she had been successful. “I’m absolutely over the moon to have been selected to be in the BBC Children’s Production Management Assistant Talent Pool” explained Rhiannon “After a group scenario task, an individual prioritising task and then an interview, I feel I learnt a lot from the process itself which I really enjoyed. I heard about the opening from the Television Production Management Facebook page. This page is great as it encourages discussion between staff, students and alumni.”

 

student Rhiannon Lawrence Perelandra Beedles programme Leader for Rhiannon’s degree is seeing a trend of Production Management undergraduates being offered positions before they have even attended their graduation ceremony “Rhiannon is such a great example of how the TVPM degree works to prepare students for jobs in the broadcast industry. Myself and fellow Programme Leader Joy Monks, spend a lot of time embedding interview skills and industry knowledge into our programme content. This degree now has a reputation for excellence through the TV industry” and it’s not just the delivered teaching which contribute to the high employability of the programme as Perelandra explains “Part of what makes TVPM students so employable are the industry placements and opportunities they are offered as a result of our industry contacts. Rhiannon attended the BBC Global Children’s summit this year and has shadowed as a floor manager on Children in need and it is partly this experience which has made her so accomplished this early on in her broadcasting career”

Lecturer Joy Monks who still continues to have a successful career in television in addition to her work at EHU is keen to praise Rhiannon’s commitment to getting the role “Rhiannon spent time with myself and Perelandra before the interview, discussing techniques, learning everything she could about the Children’s department and going back through aspects of previous lectures which could help her. This dedication and attention to detail has really paid off and we are so delighted”

BBC Children’s is the home of the UKs two most popular children’s TV channels, CBeebies and CBBC – not to mention two websites, eight apps (and counting), children’s radio content, two YouTube channels and more, so Rhiannon will have plenty of opportunities to use the skills she has learnt during the course of her Television Production Management degree.

Listening In

When Marketing with PR student Sheila Miller had the chance to spend some time in a working radio...