Dates and Departments

Applications for Summer Residentials are now CLOSED. 

The Summer Residentials will run from Monday 29th July to Thursday 1st August and Monday 5th August to Thursday 8th August.

If you have any queries about these events please contact residentials@edgehill.ac.uk  

Week 1

Animation

The animation stop-motion residential workshop sessions are dedicated to developing an understanding of the principals of movement design and production practice through the physical process of stop-motion animation. Through a series of practical sessions, you will progress animation skills and a rudimentary understanding of anatomy in relation to movement and performance. The workshops will be take you through animation production processes from 2D to 3-D stop-motion using DragonFrame animation software.

During the academic sessions, you will work on a creative project in exactly the same way as one of our first-year student groups. The project will begin with an introduction and overview of the courses and opportunities Edge Hill can offer in teaching, learning, employability and student achievements as well as a contextualisation of the project to be undertaken.

During the academic sessions, you will work on a creative project in exactly the same way as one of our first year groups. The project will begin with an introduction and overview of the courses and opportunities Edge Hill can offer in teaching, learning, employability and student achievements.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Applied Health and Social Care

The Applied Health and Social Care Summer Residential will be delivered by knowledgeable and approachable staff from the Department and supported by our own students. You will have the opportunity to experience a taste of what it is like to study on the individual programmes by taking part in a number of activities. These will include workshops, interactive discussions, internet research, quizzes and problem-solving.

Courses represented:

BSc (Hons) Child Health and Wellbeing
BSc (Hons) Global Public Health
BSc (Hons) Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing

BSc (Hons) Counselling and Psychotherapy
BSc (Hons) Nutrition and Health
BSc (Hons) Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behaviour
BA (Hons) Health and Social Wellbeing

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Business – Including Accountancy/Advertising/Economics/Management/Marketing

The summer school will introduce students to the Edge Hill Business School subject specialties of advertising, marketing, management, tourism, accounting, finance and economics. Following initial lectures with subject experts, students will form competing teams to work on a live business project with an academic mentor. Thereby, experiencing lectures, seminar, workshops and teamwork around business and enterprise which are the hallmark of the Business School degree pathways.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

Creative Media

Over the course of the residential you will be engaging in various written and creative activities that bring together a taste of three of our popular degree courses (see below). Working together in groups, you will curate a short film/music festival programme, carefully selecting film or artists by theme, writing copy and producing an original photographic image for the front cover of the brochure to promote your film/festival. Further to this, you will also produce a short podcast to contextualize your film/festival.

If you have a passion for the moving image or music and a creative flare with camera and sound, then this is the ideal taster for you.

Courses represented:

BA (Hons) Film Studies

BA (Hons) Media, Film and Television

BA (Hons) Media Music and Sound

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

Dance

Choreography Uncovered. On the Dance residential you will take part in workshops devoted to developing your contemporary dance technique and your practical understanding of composition. Work with experienced Edge Hill University lecturers in our state of the art dance studios and let us assist you in building confidence in choreography with explorations into essential composition devices and current dance making approaches to create your own ‘choreographic tool box’.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Drama

The Drama Department will be offering students an essential exploration of the work of Joan Littlewood, the creator of ‘Oh What a Lovely War!’ Over the course of the residential you will explore her work through professionally-led, practical workshops in our state of the art drama studios. You will find out about her process and approaches to creating and rehearsing a selection of contrasting genres of theatre culminating in an opportunity to share your work in an informal workshop performance.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

 

Film and TV Production

During the academic sessions, you will work on a creative project in exactly the same way as one of our first year groups. The project will begin with an introduction and overview of the Film & Television Production programme and the opportunities that Edge Hill can offer in teaching, learning, employability and student achievements.

Working in groups, you will visualise concepts, find locations, create shot list /story boards, explore the use of cameras and then develop those ideas using our industry standard facilities. At the end of the sessions you will have developed a piece of creative work which will be presented and receive feedback from academic staff and your peer-group.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

 

Music Production

During the Music Production residential, you will work on a creative project in exactly the same way as our first year students. Working in groups, you will record a song or piece of music in a digital audio recording studio. You will have access to microphones and musical instruments, including: acoustic and electric guitars and effects pedals; electric bass; grand piano and digital pianos; and electric and acoustic drums. You will also have access to rehearsal rooms and a dedicated mac lab with a range of audio software. The creative project will encompass a briefing and idea development, with the end result being a professionally recorded piece of music.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Musical Theatre

Over the course of the residential, you will explore musical theatre repertoire, combining singing, acting and dance to create a performance. You will get a taste of what it is like to study Musical Theatre at Edge Hill, working with our experienced lecturers in our state of the art dance and drama studios to build piece whilst developing your performance and critical thinking skills. The residential will culminate in an opportunity to share your work in an informal workshop performance.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Health

The professional health programmes summer residential will centre around a pre-set patient scenario that aims to provide you with an insight into the diverse role of a variety of health care professionals namely; adult, children’s, learning disability and mental health nurses, midwifery, operating department practitioners, paramedics and social workers. You will attend both theoretical and practical sessions which will give you the opportunity to explore different learning and teaching styles used within a university setting, including simulated practice sessions which will utilise a variety of clinical skills equipment.

Courses Represented:

BSc (Hons) Midwifery

BSc (Hons) Nursing (Adult)

BSc (Hons) Nursing (Children’s)

BSc (Hons) Nursing (Learning Disabilities)

BSc (Hons) Nursing (Mental Health)

BA (Hons) Social Work

MNSW Adult Nursing and Social Work

MNSW Children’s Nursing and Social Work

MNSW Learning Disabilities Nursing and Social Work

MNSW Mental Health Nursing and Social Work

BSc (Hons) Operating Department Practice

BSc (Hons) Paramedic Practice

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

Social Sciences

This programme may lead on from your A level studies and provide you with a taster of what it is like to study Sociology or Childhood Studies at degree level at Edge Hill.

By focusing on the sociological study of the media, these sessions will explore topics that are relevant to children and young people today, and ask what the future implications may be. Children and young people are in the media from Newspaper headlines to Hollyoaks and everything in-between. You will explore how identities are represented and what the implications of these may be.

You will look at the impact on children’s and young people’s identity; look at their sense of self and others. Explore the real experiences and implications children and young people face growing up within this media era. You will go on to explore how the media can affect the experiences children and young people have within the family, as consumers, as citizens, and the possible implications for this generation entering employment. Social research methods are used to explore and analyse these issues.

During the sessions you will briefly look at some of the competing theoretical perspectives to help you to further your understanding and experience degree level work.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

 

Sport & Physical Activity

The Department of Sport and Physical Activity will run a programme for the Summer Residential delivered by staff who are experts in the field and who will teach you on your programme of study at Edge Hill University.

You will engage in various practical and theory-based sessions on topics you will study on your course. Depending on whether you select the physical science or social science option, these include: sport for young people, sport and health, sports science and sports therapy (including injury and rehabilitation), the links between teaching and coaching, and the lives of people who work in sport. It is important you come dressed to engage in practical activity as well as classroom-based work. The practical sessions will take place in the excellent sports facilities on campus and you will also engage in a variety of tasks including student-led workshops, interactive discussions, research and problem-solving activities.

You will also have the opportunity to meet students currently studying with us and hear first-hand their experiences of the University, working in the ‘real world’, and the additional things they engage (e.g. courses, external sports teams and organisations) in to support their studies.

Courses Represented

Physical Science:

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science
BSc (Hons) Sports Therapy

Social Science:

BA (Hons) Physical Education and School Sport
BA (Hons) Sports Coaching and Development
BA (Hons) Sports Development and Management
BA (Hons) Sport Management and Coaching

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

Week 2

 

Biology

During this residential course you will experience a taste of life as a first year undergraduate student within the Department of Biology. You will take part in a range of practical lab and field based sessions that encompass the disciplines taught within the common first year of our degree programmes; Biology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Human Biology, Food Sciences, Plant Science and Ecology & Conservation. You will use state of the art technology to complete a range of investigations and will have the opportunity to complete a mini research project.

The Department of Biology has received major investment, with brand new lab space and enhanced research facilities. You will have an opportunity to use these facilities during the course, experiencing first-hand the research and practical elements that our undergraduate students enjoy whilst studying here.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

 

Computer Science

Over the past two decades, there has been an exponential increase in digital applications and now computer science is integrated in everything that touches our every day lives; from the cars we drive, the movies we watch, the music we listen to, the way we shop, the way we communicate, and the ways businesses and governments operate. Thus, understanding different dimensions of computing gives you a range of transferable skills and knowledge; computing drives innovation in the sciences, engineering, business, entertainment and education.

At this year’s residential you will attend workshop sessions that span a wide range of different computer science topics, from Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality to Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. You will have the opportunity to experience the versatility and complexity of computing through the creation of relevant software applications. During hands-on practical sessions, you will have the opportunity to develop web-based games using HTML/CSS/Javascript, introduced to fundamentals of ethical hacking, and interact with our virtual reality infrastructure (CAVE/HTC Vive) and humanoid robots available at the Department of Computer Science.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Creative Writing

Journeys. Explore real and imaginary journeys through words and images. You will have the chance to working intensively with a professional writer, creating a short script, story or poem from scratch in a friendly, collaborative environment. No experience necessary, just a willingness to go on a real or an imaginary journey. You’ll learn how to get inspired and how to keep on writing; how to develop character, plot and dialogue; how to edit and redraft; and how to make language come alive on the page. At the end of your session you will take part in a short, informal reading of your final piece of work – your first step on the road to becoming a published writer.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

English Language

Over the course of the English Language residential the sessions will cover three areas of language study. In ‘Where does language come from?’ you will explore how language is acquired and how language has evolved from its early origins; in ‘What is possible in language?’ you will examine how language is used once it has been learnt and explore what language can consist of; and in ‘What is the future of language?’ you will learn about language death and the influence of technology on language in the 21st century.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

English Literature

Over the course of the English Literature residential you will have the opportunity to feed your passion for the written word while developing essential communication skills which are highly valued by employers. You will look at a wide range of texts, from the classics to contemporary fiction and poetry.

If you have a passion for reading and a love of language, an enthusiasm for the ideas that lie behind published literature in all its forms, and a desire to know more about motivations and the impact of literature on societies, then this is the ideal taster for you. You will be working with a department which prides itself on its dynamic, modern and flexible programmes.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Geography

The residential course will give you the opportunity to experience life as a first year student in the Department of Geography. There will be both field and laboratory sessions that incorporate a range of methodological approaches and geographical techniques that we teach in the first year of our Geography and Geoenvironmental Hazards degree programmes. Whether your interest is in human geography, physical geography or environmental hazards you will be able to complete a mini-project in a topic of interest to you and also have the opportunity use Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The academic workshops will be delivered by our team of friendly tutors and you will get the chance to use some of our new computing and laboratory facilities within the department.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

Geology

The residential course will give you the opportunity to experience life as a first year Geology student in the Department of Geography. There will be both field and laboratory sessions that incorporate a range of theoretical and methodological approaches and you will learn some key geological techniques, such as, hand specimen and thin section analysis. The learning sessions will give you an insight into our first year teaching in ‘Rocks Minerals and Fossils’ and ‘Geological Research Methods’. The academic workshops will be delivered by our team of friendly tutors and you will get the chance to use some of our new facilities within the department, including our suite of petrological microscopes.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

History

Why Did Charles I Lose His Head?

Crown and People from Henry VIII to Oliver Cromwell

Why study history? The historian Peter Stearns has argued that: ‘Historians do not perform heart transplants or improve highway design… In a society that expects education to serve useful purposes, the functions of history can seem more difficult to define than those of engineering or medicine. History is in fact very useful …’

Thinking about the 16 and 17th centuries allows us to explore historical documents of the time, which is exciting in itself, but it also allows us to think about how different societies function and how people behave. These are invaluable skills for understanding humanity and they lay the foundations for good citizenship – through an ability to research, analyse and interpret the infinite varieties of the world we live in, for work, for leisure and for social and political change.

Many A level students are quite familiar with modern history, so in this course we take a different approach to thinking about whether ‘the past is another country’. In 1534, Henry VIII was so powerful that he could force his country to accept his headship of the English church. Only a century later, Charles I went to the executioner’s block.

A programme of lectures, workshops and independent research will explore the long and short-term factors which contributed to Charles’ fate. We will investigate the impact of the Reformation, the challenge of ruling multiple kingdoms, and the growing divide between rich and poor. Our sources will be taken from popular culture, allowing us to examine how the common people were affected by the crown’s decisions, and the course will culminate in a mock-trial of Charles I. The response to why King Charles lost his head answers so many more questions than just those relating to one man 400 years ago.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Law, Criminology and Policing

Law, Criminology and Policing all within the same department, so with that in mind, on the first day, you will be given a taste of all three disciplines. The programme we have put together will be delivered by knowledgeable and approachable staff from the department supported by our own students.

You will have the opportunity to experience a taste of what it is like to study these courses at Edge Hill University by taking part in a number of activities relating to to what you would do on the degrees. These will include workshops, debates, internet research and problem-solving. The topics you will study cover a range of current issues. We hope that you really enjoy your experiences at Edge Hill.

Sessions on day one:

Criminology Session 1: What is Crime?
We all think we know what crime is, but in reality what constitutes a crime varies according to a range of criteria. This interactive session will explore the notion that crime is essentially a social construction, contingent on time, place and context, and reflective of processes of discrimination. You will be introduced to the idea that focusing on ‘crime’ can lead us into inconsistencies and into missing very serious social harms that governments choose not to criminalize.

Law Session 1: How Law is Made and How It Works
This session will introduce you to how law is made in the UK and the different sources of law in the UK legal system. The session will offer several interactive tasks, such as voting on your own laws in a mock Parliament and undertaking the role of the Government or the Opposition in a debate about a new law.

Policing Session 1: The Role and Function of the Police
This session will introduce the variety of roles performed by the modern-day police service and the multiple views of it function in the 21st Century.

Criminology sessions: 

Criminology Session 2: Born or Made? Explaining ‘Criminality’.
Since the late nineteenth century criminologists have advanced theories that seek to explain what causes ‘crime’. These theories have often contradicted each other, and some have had disastrous results when put into practice. In this session we will explore some of the main approaches to crime and ‘its’ causes, from biological theories to environmental theories. We will then approach some of the more complex questions about the origins of crime – in relation to organizational and state crime.

Criminology Session 3: Responding to Crime: Problems with Punishment
Criminal justice systems around the world respond to wide varieties of crimes in strikingly similar and unimaginative ways. The failure of these responses to adequately solve the ‘problem of crime’ has raised important questions about the assumptions that underpin them and the problematic ways in which they are applied. This session considers these debates and invites us to think about how the punishments that we take for granted in the early twentieth century are often outdated, unjust, and ineffective.

Criminology Session 4: Understanding Crimes of the Powerful
The most consistent pattern in the modern history of criminal justice systems across the world is the way that whilst they punish individual behaviours very severely, they are extraordinarily lenient when it comes to crimes and harms carried out by powerful organisations such as corporations, professions and the state. Yet it the latter that have caused by far the most suffering. Drawing on current research at Edge Hill, this session takes us back to some of the issues that were first raised in session one, and suggests a number of key elements that produce and reproduce harms including slavery, mass killing and genocide, and crimes against the environment.

Law sessions: 

Law Session 2: That’s not my Contract!
This session will introduce some of the core elements of forming a contract in law. You will learn about how you form a legally binding agreement, sometime more than once, almost every day. By learning about some of the rules that make a contract invalid or void, you can test your knowledge in several interactive scenarios in the game “That’s not my Contract!” – learning about what happens when someone lies before a contract, when a contract is illegal, and much more.

Law Session 3 – The law of Torts – Who pays for the wrongs of violent employees?
This session introduces you to the law of torts, in particular, the law of vicarious liability and explores how the law has developed in recent years in relation to employers’ liability for the intentional wrongs of violent employees. You will have an opportunity to play the role of legal researchers in solving a legal problem in this area.

Law Session 4: Introduction to Criminal Law – (Offences Against the Sports Person)
This session introduces you to the criminal law with particular focus on responses to violence in sport.  The general law relating to actual bodily harm, grievous bodily harm and wounding is regulated by the Offences Against the Persons Act 1861. When sports participants ‘assault’ fellow participants on the sports field they are, in theory, regulated by the same law of the land as would be the case if the assault had taken place elsewhere. However, in professional sport, in particular, this does not seem to be the case. This session will look at some acts of violence on the sports field and discuss how and in what way the criminal law is likely to react to them.

Policing sessions:

Policing Session 2: Police Powers
This session will introduce a number of police powers and in particular we will look at those coercive police powers that promote controversy and debate in the media and elsewhere, such as stop and search and the Regulation of investigatory powers  Act 2000.

Policing Session 3 – Police Investigation
This session will explore the methods used by police investigators and detectives to manage a criminal investigation and the processes used to maximise the evidential potential from crime scenes, victims, witnesses and offenders. The session will focus on investigation processes and suspect interviews.

Policing Session 4: Policing High-Profile Cases
This session will take the form of an examination of a case study, this will be a high profile criminal investigation, highlighting the investigative methodology and challenges overcome by the investigation team.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

Politics

At this residential you’ll be looking at the realities of politics. We’ll be looking at what politicians do and how the different bits of the political system work. We’ll then be focusing on a real scenario and developing ideas turning political ideas into potential reality. The project chosen will very much depend on current events, but you might be working on a plan for a House of Commons committee enquiry or an outline for an election campaign.

As part of the residential you’ll meet people who have been involved in active politics and you’ll have a chance to discuss and explore real issues. We’ll be thinking about how these issues are affected by systems and structures, like the voting system, the way the House of Commons works and the way political parties develop.

You don’t need to be already studying politics to benefit from this, but you do need to have an interest in the subject.

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

 

Psychology

The Department of Psychology is delighted to offer a Residential programme for students with a keen interest in pursuing Psychology at University. The Residential will provide students with an insight into two main core areas within the study of Psychology. The first core area includes a Social Psychology Perspective which will enable students to explore non-verbal communication, and what our behavioural expressions reveal about the mind. The second core area includes Cognitive Psychology which introduces Eye-witness testimony, and the Psychology behind the accuracy of our memory in Forensic contexts. This is an exciting opportunity to explore why for example, failures in memory may lead us to make mistakes recalling a crime.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

Teaching and Education

Students will choose between Early Years and Primary age group (teaching and working with children aged 0-11) or Secondary (teaching and working with children aged 11-16 or 11-19).

Students will have an opportunity to learn about the traditional routes into Teacher Education for their chosen age range, as well as alternative courses leading to teaching and working with children and young people in any sphere of education.

You will get an invaluable Higher Education experience, taking part in practical, hands on workshops studying different subjects through tasters, lectures and seminars. Topics may range from creative curriculum to behaviour management. All sessions will be delivered by Edge Hill University staff, who have expert knowledge and experience related to teaching and working with children and young people. Choosing a specific age range to look into will enable you to gain an in-depth understanding of working with those age-groups, either as teachers or other professionals in education. We hope this experience will support the decisions you make about Higher Education in the future.

 

Please see the departmental and course pages for more information about the individual undergraduate courses.

 

Working with Children

You will get an invaluable Higher Education experience with the opportunity to learn about routes into the Children’s and Young People’s workforce in schools, alternative educational contexts and communities.

You will take part in practical, hands on workshops focused on a range of subjects including creative approaches to teaching, multi-agency working, and working with families. Subjects are delivered through tasters, lectures and seminars and by Edge Hill University staff, who have expert knowledge and experience related to teaching and working with children and young people in a variety of educational contexts.

You will also have the opportunity to engage with current university students and gain an insight into life on campus and at the University. We hope this experience will support the decisions you make about Higher Education in the future.

Please see information about the courses relevant to this topic under ‘Professional Education’ by clicking this link. 

 

Departments require a minimum number of students to run their residential so we reserve the right to withdraw any department or subject from the residential at any time.

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