Edge Hill academic claims chocolate could be the next healthy snack

A lecturer from Edge Hill University has discovered that chocolate can be manufactured in a way which may help with weight management, and it won’t taste any different.

Dr Catherine Tsang, Senior Lecturer in Human Nutrition and Health in the Faculty of Health and Social Care, collaborated with top Belgian chocolate company, Barry Callebaut, who manufacture chocolate using the Acticoa method, to preserve important compounds within the cocoa.

Usually when chocolate is produced, some of the compounds within the cocoa are lost, however the Acticoa method ensures that over 80 per cent of the antioxidant properties – the polyphenols – are retained, meaning a larger amount of these healthy compounds are consumed.

So what are the health benefits of these compounds? And are there any benefits of adding fibre to chocolate? Catherine has conducted research to find out whether consuming polyphenol-rich dark chocolate and adding fibre can help us feel fuller for longer.

Dark chocolate has a greater content of cocoa and lower content of sugar compared to milk chocolate, so chocolatiers at Barry Callebaut developed three types of dark chocolate buttons for the project, which all tasted and looked exactly the same. One type contained polyphenol-rich dark chocolate, one contained the same chocolate with added fibre, and the final chocolate was a placebo, low in polyphenols and matched for energy and other nutrients.

Twelve healthy volunteers consumed 20g of each chocolate on three separate occasions.

As well as analysing their normal food intake before and after consuming each type of chocolate, urine samples were also collected to measure levels of polyphenols.

They were then invited to an open buffet where they could consume as much as they liked of a test meal so Catherine could measure their satiety.

The volunteers were also asked to complete a visual analogue scale which recorded their feeling of hunger and desire to eat before and then after consuming the chocolate, which they filled in six times at different intervals within two hours of consumption of chocolate.

After 15 minutes of consuming the polyphenol-rich chocolate with added fibre, desire to eat was significantly less. The volunteers felt like they had eaten enough, they were kept full for an average of two hours and consumed less calories the following day. Similar findings were also found after consuming polyphenol-rich chocolate without added fibre but were more effective with added fibre. No effect was found after the placebo chocolate.

Fibre has many health benefits and the recommended daily intake in the UK is 30g a day, with the average person only consuming between 17 – 20g. Manufacturing chocolate with added fibre could help people increase their intake, keeping them fuller for longer.

This means that dark chocolate containing preserved polyphenols and added fibre could be used as a healthy snack, as part of a healthy balanced diet.

Catherine has been working with academics at the University of Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University and Liverpool Hope University, and they plan to carry out further studies to monitor satiety over a longer period of time, and to understand their mechanism.

Edge Hill launches new Nursing programme

Edge Hill University is one of three sites across England that has been chosen to deliver the National Accelerated MSc Pre-registration Nursing Programme.

This is a national pilot between Cheshire and Wirral Partnership, Mersey Care and North West Boroughs Partnership and Edge Hill around Mental Health and Learning Disability Nursing.

The delivery of the two year National Accelerated Nursing Programme builds upon two previous programmes where an accelerated MSc in Nursing was delivered in partnership with Alder Hey NHS Foundation Trust, and Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust.

This programme is unique in working with local NHS Trusts to provide students with the opportunity to recognise their prior degree qualification and experience of working in a care setting, supported by an additional year of supported learning in practice post qualification. It also exposes them to different types and different levels of nursing.

There are ten students on this course at Edge Hill – five mental health nurses and five learning disability nurses – and they have a guaranteed job working with one of the Trusts for a year following graduation.

Leading the project is Senior Lecturer in Strategic and Operational Leadership, Lynda Carey, who said:

“The students have shown a strong commitment to improving patient care within the field of mental health and learning disability nursing. They are a distinct set of students who are bringing their past experience and critical thinking to their new area of practice, challenging and contributing to the improvement of care. As a group they will, along with the other pilots, share their learning and experiences with Health England, and NHS England national team in addition to senior nurses in the local NHS Trusts and the Faculty.”

The Faculty of Health and Social Care is one of the leading providers of education and training for health and social care professionals in the North West of England. The leading edge clinical skills facilities include ward simulations and operating theatres with industry standard equipment, as well as robot-style mannequins that can simulate a wide range of symptoms, from pregnancy to a temperature, to ensure the learning experience is as realistic as possible.

Click here to find out more about the course.

Edge Hill University announces Medical School

Edge Hill University will offer an Access to Medicine course from 2019 and train doctors from 2020, following the announcement by the Secretary of State for Health to establish a Medical School at the University.

The new facility will open at the Ormskirk Campus, within the successful Faculty of Health and Social Care which is already one of the largest providers of health and social care education in the North West of England.

The funding has been announced following a highly competitive process to allocate 1,500 additional places to train doctors in England.

The new Medical School is one of only three new free-standing medical schools in the country and the only one in the North West, the undergraduate programme complementing the University’s well-established postgraduate medical degrees.

The expansion opens the door for many more students to gain high-quality medical education and training. Undergraduate medical courses are currently heavily oversubscribed and this will open up new opportunities for many aspiring doctors and medical professionals.

The University first trained nurses over 50 years ago, and was one of the first to offer large-scale nursing at undergraduate degree level leading to professional registration. The Faculty’s suite of professional programmes includes all disciplines of nursing, midwifery, paramedic practice, operating department practice and social work at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Seth Crofts, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of the Faculty of Health and Social Care said: “The Faculty of Health and Social Care has an established reputation for providing an excellent student experience with high level tutorial support.  We are determined that our Medical School will follow this tradition enabling our students to be resilient and flexible doctors who are able to respond to the current challenges in the NHS.  We are keen to recruit students from a wide range of backgrounds who have a real commitment to the populations that we serve across the North West.”

“Our programme will strongly endorse multi-professional learning and will draw on a wide expertise from doctors who are clinical experts at our hospital and community partners across the North West.  We are developing a state of the art teaching facility on the Ormskirk campus to house the new Medical School, which will provide leading clinical simulation and laboratory facilities making use of the latest interactive technology.” 

In addition to the above programmes, the University’s Postgraduate Medical Institute houses well-established educational programmes and programmatic research involving external stakeholders and delivers work-based postgraduate medical leadership throughout the region.

Dr John CaterDr John Cater, Vice-Chancellor at Edge Hill University said: “For the past decade Edge Hill University has been providing postgraduate medical education and training for qualified doctors working in the NHS.  I am absolutely delighted that this work has been recognised by the Department of Health, who have now decided to allocate undergraduate medical numbers to the University for the first time.

“The Edge Hill University Medical School represents an important and significant milestone in the development of a hugely successful university, and builds upon the outstanding work of the Faculty of Health and Social Care in the delivery of education and training for nurses, midwives, paramedics and operating department staff over many years.  We are also determined that the Edge Hill University Medical School will be distinctive, with a strong focus on widening access, community medicine, general practice and psychiatry.”

Edge Hill University announces Medical School

Edge Hill University will offer an Access to Medicine course from 2019 and train doctors from 2020, following the announcement by the Secretary of State for Health to establish a Medical School at the University.

The new facility will open at the Ormskirk Campus, within the successful Faculty of Health and Social Care which is already one of the largest providers of health and social care education in the North West of England.

The funding has been announced following a highly competitive process to allocate 1,500 additional places to train doctors in England.

The new Medical School is one of only three new free-standing medical schools in the country and the only one in the North West, the undergraduate programme complementing the University’s well-established postgraduate medical degrees.

The expansion opens the door for many more students to gain high-quality medical education and training. Undergraduate medical courses are currently heavily oversubscribed and this will open up new opportunities for many aspiring doctors and medical professionals.

The University first trained nurses over 50 years ago, and was one of the first to offer large-scale nursing at undergraduate degree level leading to professional registration. The Faculty’s suite of professional programmes includes all disciplines of nursing, midwifery, paramedic practice, operating department practice and social work at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Seth Crofts, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of the Faculty of Health and Social Care said: “The Faculty of Health and Social Care has an established reputation for providing an excellent student experience with high level tutorial support.  We are determined that our Medical School will follow this tradition enabling our students to be resilient and flexible doctors who are able to respond to the current challenges in the NHS.  We are keen to recruit students from a wide range of backgrounds who have a real commitment to the populations that we serve across the North West.”

“Our programme will strongly endorse multi-professional learning and will draw on a wide expertise from doctors who are clinical experts at our hospital and community partners across the North West.  We are developing a state of the art teaching facility on the Ormskirk campus to house the new Medical School, which will provide leading clinical simulation and laboratory facilities making use of the latest interactive technology.” 

In addition to the above programmes, the University’s Postgraduate Medical Institute houses well-established educational programmes and programmatic research involving external stakeholders and delivers work-based postgraduate medical leadership throughout the region.

Dr John CaterDr John Cater, Vice-Chancellor at Edge Hill University said: “For the past decade Edge Hill University has been providing postgraduate medical education and training for qualified doctors working in the NHS.  I am absolutely delighted that this work has been recognised by the Department of Health, who have now decided to allocate undergraduate medical numbers to the University for the first time.

“The Edge Hill University Medical School represents an important and significant milestone in the development of a hugely successful university, and builds upon the outstanding work of the Faculty of Health and Social Care in the delivery of education and training for nurses, midwives, paramedics and operating department staff over many years.  We are also determined that the Edge Hill University Medical School will be distinctive, with a strong focus on widening access, community medicine, general practice and psychiatry.”

The theory behind play revealed

Students Megan Green and Amy Lindsay

The importance of ‘play for the sake of playing’ was examined at a unique event featuring pop up adventure playgrounds, hula hoops, bubble machines and the research behind all the fun at Edge Hill University.

Specialist practitioners and academics were on hand to explain why playing, colouring, making and simply enjoying yourself is important at the Play Symposium in the Faculty of Health and Social Care.

The aim of the event was to celebrate play, from childhood to adulthood, and raising awareness of play as a fundamental human right; considering the wider holistic benefits of play including therapeutic uses and supporting resilience, mental health and wellbeing.

Suzanna Law

The symposium featured guest speaker Suzanna Law, one of the founders of UK based charity Pop Up Adventure Play. The pop up adventure playground model is a temporary play space that can be set up anywhere for open-ended play with loose parts and materials, and supervised by playworkers.

Standing next to a homemade playground comprising sturdy tubes and recycled materials, she explained what the charity is about. “It’s amazing what children are capable of if they are given a little time to play. We show adults how great play can be and encourage children to do it, explaining why play is important and what children can get out of it,”

“Play is as important as eating, sleeping and breathing for a child,” said Suzanna. “If a child is play deprived there is a fundamental jigsaw piece missing, it contributes to movement and skills and executive functioning – any task that requires planning, organization, memory, time management and flexible thinking becomes a challenge.

“Parents are sometimes worried that children might fall behind if they are playing rather than learning, and also don’t want them to go outside because they think ti’s not safe, but society has never been safer. Children shouldn’t be missing out.”

Karen Boardman

Karen Boardman, Head of Early Years in the Faculty of Education spoke to the students about play deprivation, and how play is implicated in children’s brain development, and there was the opportunity to try different play materials such as bubbles, homemade play dough and other sensory play materials, hula hoops and photo booths with dressing up costumes.

 

Zoi Moula, a Graduate Teaching Assistant who is completing her PhD in Arts Therapies outlined her current research which involves working with children in mainstream primary schools to understand their perspectives and physical responses to movement.

But play isn’t just important to children, the idea of play for all ages was also included.

Catherine Wilkinson, Lecturer in Children, Young People and Families, explained how young people engage with radio and how young people use radio to play. She worked with Community Station KCC Live in Knowsley when carrying out her research. She said: “Radio is a whole lifespan play activity,” she said, “for example editing or recording a voice over is a kind of play, and adults play with the technology as well.

“Adults also play when they take part in drama, a theatre production, wearing costumes, fancy dress, just because you’re older doesn’t mean you don’t play any more.”

John Marsden

John Marsden, lecturer in Counselling in the Faculty of Health and Social Care also discussed with the students the benefits of colouring, adult colouring, and relaxation, and also how some young people he has worked with have gained control of their life through the medium of colouring.

The event was organised by Hayley McKenzie and Laura Ashton-Goldthorpe and is part of the programme of study for students in Child Health and Wellbeing and Health and Social Wellbeing degree courses.

Hayley said: “We wanted to look at play through the ages, from birth onwards, considering what it provides physically, for wellbeing, emotionally and in the community.

“Everybody should play and can play. Play shouldn’t have to end in a product – it is something to do for the sake of playing and it doesn’t have an end result.

“When we play and enjoy ourselves chemicals such as serotonin are released in the brain, research by Simon Young published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience in 2007 suggests that serotonin which is found in the brain when we experience positive mood plays a role, not only in the treatment of depression but also in susceptibility to depression and suicide.”

“Likewise play is seen as a tool for happiness, reducing anxiety, strain and burn out, it contributes to relationship success boosts your immune system and promotes overall holistic health and wellbeing in all ages. Everybody needs to make more time for play.”

Find out more about studying Applied Health and Social Care Courses here.

The theory behind play revealed

Students Megan Green and Amy Lindsay

The importance of ‘play for the sake of playing’ was examined at a unique event featuring pop up adventure playgrounds, hula hoops, bubble machines and the research behind all the fun at Edge Hill University.

Specialist practitioners and academics were on hand to explain why playing, colouring, making and simply enjoying yourself is important at the Play Symposium in the Faculty of Health and Social Care.

The aim of the event was to celebrate play, from childhood to adulthood, and raising awareness of play as a fundamental human right; considering the wider holistic benefits of play including therapeutic uses and supporting resilience, mental health and wellbeing.

Suzanna Law

The symposium featured guest speaker Suzanna Law, one of the founders of UK based charity Pop Up Adventure Play. The pop up adventure playground model is a temporary play space that can be set up anywhere for open-ended play with loose parts and materials, and supervised by playworkers.

Standing next to a homemade playground comprising sturdy tubes and recycled materials, she explained what the charity is about. “It’s amazing what children are capable of if they are given a little time to play. We show adults how great play can be and encourage children to do it, explaining why play is important and what children can get out of it,”

“Play is as important as eating, sleeping and breathing for a child,” said Suzanna. “If a child is play deprived there is a fundamental jigsaw piece missing, it contributes to movement and skills and executive functioning – any task that requires planning, organization, memory, time management and flexible thinking becomes a challenge.

“Parents are sometimes worried that children might fall behind if they are playing rather than learning, and also don’t want them to go outside because they think ti’s not safe, but society has never been safer. Children shouldn’t be missing out.”

Karen Boardman

Karen Boardman, Head of Early Years in the Faculty of Education spoke to the students about play deprivation, and how play is implicated in children’s brain development, and there was the opportunity to try different play materials such as bubbles, homemade play dough and other sensory play materials, hula hoops and photo booths with dressing up costumes.

 

Zoi Moula, a Graduate Teaching Assistant who is completing her PhD in Arts Therapies outlined her current research which involves working with children in mainstream primary schools to understand their perspectives and physical responses to movement.

But play isn’t just important to children, the idea of play for all ages was also included.

Catherine Wilkinson, Lecturer in Children, Young People and Families, explained how young people engage with radio and how young people use radio to play. She worked with Community Station KCC Live in Knowsley when carrying out her research. She said: “Radio is a whole lifespan play activity,” she said, “for example editing or recording a voice over is a kind of play, and adults play with the technology as well.

“Adults also play when they take part in drama, a theatre production, wearing costumes, fancy dress, just because you’re older doesn’t mean you don’t play any more.”

John Marsden

John Marsden, lecturer in Counselling in the Faculty of Health and Social Care also discussed with the students the benefits of colouring, adult colouring, and relaxation, and also how some young people he has worked with have gained control of their life through the medium of colouring.

The event was organised by Hayley McKenzie and Laura Ashton-Goldthorpe and is part of the programme of study for students in Child Health and Wellbeing and Health and Social Wellbeing degree courses.

Hayley said: “We wanted to look at play through the ages, from birth onwards, considering what it provides physically, for wellbeing, emotionally and in the community.

“Everybody should play and can play. Play shouldn’t have to end in a product – it is something to do for the sake of playing and it doesn’t have an end result.

“When we play and enjoy ourselves chemicals such as serotonin are released in the brain, research by Simon Young published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience in 2007 suggests that serotonin which is found in the brain when we experience positive mood plays a role, not only in the treatment of depression but also in susceptibility to depression and suicide.”

“Likewise play is seen as a tool for happiness, reducing anxiety, strain and burn out, it contributes to relationship success boosts your immune system and promotes overall holistic health and wellbeing in all ages. Everybody needs to make more time for play.”

Find out more about studying Applied Health and Social Care Courses here.

Palliative and End Of Life Care Catalyst Research Event

Interested in Research around Palliative and End of Life Care? Have an idea but not sure where to start? Need to network with people interested in research? Whether you are a curious clinician, seasoned academic or enthusiastic novice this research catalyst event is for you.

Please click here to book a place

Initially we are limiting places to two from each organisation in order to ensure we enable as board a range of people interested in research to attend as possible.

Places are limited so please book early to ensure a place on this exciting day.  As part of the day you will be asked to come with a list of the top 5  clinical areas where research would make a difference to patient care.  We would encourage you to gather thoughts and ideas from your colleagues about what those topics might be before the day so we can reflect as many ideas and areas of concern as possible.