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Children and young people with SEND adversely affected by COVID-19

Publish date: January 31, 2022

New research by Edge Hill University has revealed that children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns. 

New research by Edge Hill University has revealed that children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns. 

Many suffered isolation and had their access to education, health services and social, emotional and mental health support disrupted or withdrawn. 

Lucy Bray, a Professor of Child Health Literacy at Edge Hill University, was among the team of researchers involved in the study.  

Professor Bray said: “I have felt very privileged to have been able to work with children and young people with SEND parents and professionals as part of this study. The pandemic has hit many children and young people with SEND and their families particularly hard and it will take many years, renewed investment and a new co-ordinated approach to services to make sure that their basic rights are met.” 

The Ask, Listen, Act project is a multi–disciplinary study undertaken by academics from Liverpool John Moores University, Edge Hill University and the University of Liverpool

They found that, pre-pandemic, there were already stark inequalities and limitations in the provision of services for children with SEND.   

Following the announcement of the first lockdown in March 2020, findings suggest the problem was exacerbated, with education, mental health, and social care services downgraded or, in some cases, withdrawn altogether. 

The researchers used a wide variety of sources in their information gathering. They reviewed existing evidence, and surveyed children, parents, carers and professionals including education staff, health and social care staff and those working within the local authority. They also held workshops in schools and within charitable organisations, where they met children and young people with SEND, parents/carers and professionals to gather their views.

The team used a variety of methods to make sure the views and opinions of children and young people with SEND, their parents and professionals informed the study. 

The online survey was completed by 55 children with SEND, 893 parent/carers, 163 health and social care professionals, 100 education, professionals and 44 local authority professionals. 

Respondents were distributed across the UK; children had a broad range of SEND and a range of multi-disciplinary health and social care and educational professionals took part. Four children and young people with SEND, 10 parents and 15 professionals were involved in online semi-structured interviews and 20 children and young people with SEND, 11 parents/carers and 38 professionals took part in workshops. 

The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research‘s (NIHR) Policy Research Programme (Recovery, Renewal, Reset: Research to inform policy responses to COVID-19 funding stream) in May 2021. 

Dr Emma Ashworth, Liverpool John Moores University, said: “Children and young people with SEND have had a particularly difficult experience during the pandemic – the changing rules and restrictions have had a huge impact on their mental health and wellbeing, education, social and emotional development, and access to healthcare services. There is much work to be done to better support children with SEND and their families during the pandemic.” 

Dr Joanna Kirkby, Liverpool John Moores University, said: “Through our work with children and young people with SEND, their parents and professionals, we have seen how harmful (and on occasion devastating) the pandemic has been for some children and young people with SEND. At times, some children and young people with SEND received no support of any kind. I hope action can be taken quickly to increase support and improve provision for children and young people with SEND.” 

Prof Amel Alghrani, University of Liverpool, said: “This is an important study which examines exactly what impact legislative changes made in response to the COVID had on one of the most vulnerable cohorts in society: children and young people with SEND and their families. Children with SEND and their parents/carers have been directly consulted and are at the heart of this study. It is imperative that their voices are now heard, their legal rights respected, and action taken.”

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