Criminology Research

Introduction

There is a long tradition of criminological research at Edge Hill University going back over 30 years. In that time, Edge Hill criminologists have produced important and influential research, for instance on disasters, corporate and state harm, policing, and theoretical and philosophical criminology.

The Police Research Unit is a centre for research excellence in policing. Members of the PRU provide cutting edge independent research which aims to make evidence-based impacts on policy and practice at local, national and international levels.

The Department of Law and Criminology is also home for the Power, Discourse and Harm Research Unit which focuses on research on: state/corporate power; state/corporate discourse; zemiology (the study of harms); and agnotology (the study of the deliberate construction of social ignorance).

All other criminological research comes under the umbrella of the Criminology Research Group. Alongside policing and power discourse and harm, the members of the Criminology Research group specialise in research on:

  • Children, Young People and Families
  • Migration and Race
  • Crime and Place
  • Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology

We welcome applications for undergraduate study in criminology or policing.

Publications

Publications

Publications from 2014 onwards

The full publications list is on the University Research Archive

Books

  • Millie, A. (2016 forthcoming) Philosophical Criminology, Bristol: The Policy Press.

Books (edited collections)

  • Bullock, K. and Millie, A. (2017 forthcoming) The Special Constabulary: Historical Context, International Comparisons and Contemporary Themes, Abingdon: Routledge.

Journal Articles

  • Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2015) ‘Show me the Prison: The Development of Prison Tourism in Britain’, Crime, Media, Culture, 11(3) 237-258.
  • Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2014) ‘Editorial Comment: The Prison and the Public’, Prison Service Journal, (214). pp. 2-3.
  • Davies, J.T. (2014) ‘Silencing the Whistleblowers’ Criminal Justice Matters, 95 pp 24-25.
  • Millie, A. (2016) ‘Urban Interventionism as a Challenge to Aesthetic Order: Towards an Aesthetic Criminology’, Crime, Media, Culture. Online First DOI: 10.1177/1741659016631609
  • Millie, A. (2015) ‘Street Art, Public City: Law, Crime and the Urban Imagination. By Alison Young’, British Journal of Criminology, 55(1) 205-208.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘The case for a narrower focus to policing’, The Great Debate: How Wide or Narrow Should the Police’s Remit Be? Public Safety Leadership Research Focus, 2(4) 1-4. Australian Institute for Police Management.
  • White, H. (2014) ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis: An Introduction to my PhD Research’ European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control: Summer Newsletter II.
  • White, H., Ryan, L., Wadsworth, C. and Williams, P. (2014) ‘Review of ‘The Prison and the Public’ Conference, Edge Hill University 2013, Prison Service Journal No 214.

Book Chapters

  • Barton, A. and Davis, H. (2015) ‘Neo-liberalism, Higher Education and Anti-Politics: The Assault on the Criminological Imagination’, in Frauley, J. (ed.) C Wright Mills and the Criminological Imagination, Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Baker, H. (2014), ‘Loss of Control’ and ‘Insanity Defence’, in Taylor, P., Corteen, K. and Morley, S. (eds.) (2014) A Companion to Criminal Justice, Mental Health and Risk, Bristol, UK: Policy Press.
  • Davies, J.T. and Peters, E. (2014) ‘Relationships between Gatekeepers and Researchers: The Experience of Conducting Evaluations into Parenting Programmes in Community and Penal Settings’, in Lumsden, K. and Winter, A. (eds.) Reflexivity in Criminological Research: Experiences with the Powerful and the Powerless, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmilllan.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘The aesthetics of anti-social behaviour’, in S. Pickard (ed.) Anti-Social Behaviour in Britain: Victorian and Contemporary Perspectives, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘What are the police for? Re-thinking policing post-austerity’, in J.M. Brown (ed.) The Future of Policing, London: Routledge.
  • Millie,  A. (2014) ‘Reassurance policing and signal crimes’, in G. Bruinsma and D. Weisburd (eds.) Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice, New York: Springer.

Conference Papers and other Invited Presentations

  • Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2014) ‘Prison Tourism: Past and Present’, Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating the Criminal Past Conference, SOLON, Nottingham Galleries of Justice, January 2014.
  • Millie, A. (2015) ‘Marcel Duchamp and philosophical criminology’, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Plymouth, July 2015.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘How wide or narrow should the police’s remit be?’ Plenary, 2nd International Conference on Law Enforcement and Public Health, Free University, Amsterdam, October 2014.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘Why crime has not ‘dropped’: A morality tale’, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Liverpool, July 2014.
  • Peters, E. (2014) ‘Criminal records: Music and expanding the criminological imagination’, National Deviancy Conference, Teesside University, June 2014.
  • White, H. (2014) ‘On the Road to Genocide? A Critical Analysis of the Neoliberal Narration of Crisis’, European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control 42nd Annual Conference, Liverpool John Moores University, September 2014.
  • White, H. (2014) ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis: An Introduction’, Postgraduate Stream of the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control Undergraduate Conference, John Moore’s University, April 2014.
  • White, H. (2014) ‘Poverty Porn: A Critical Analysis of Popular Media Representations of Benefit Claimants in a Culture of Blame’, Cutting Edge: Culture, Identity, Representation, Edge Hill University, March 2014.

Earlier publications (2008-2013)

Books

  • Millie, A. (2009) Anti-Social Behaviour, Maidenhead: Open University Press.
  • Millie, A. (ed.) (2009) Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. and Das, D.K. (eds.) (2008) Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement and Policing, Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press (Taylor & Francis).

Journal Articles

  • Baker, H. (2013) ‘The Significance of Shame in the Lives of Women who Experience Male Violence’, The Liverpool Law Review, 34(2) 145-171.
  • Barton, A. and Davis, H. (2013) ‘The Politics of Crime and the Crimes of Politics: Where Does Criminology Stand in the “War on the Poor”?European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control: Autumn Newsletter. Available at: www.europeangroup.org/links/
  • Davis H. (2013) ‘Making Sense of Disaster: Towards a Contextual, Phased Understanding of Organisationally Based Acute Civilian Disasters’, British Journal of Criminology 53(3) 378-400.
  • Millie, A. (2013) ‘The policing task and the expansion (and contraction) of British policing’, Criminology and Criminal Justice, 13(2) 143-160.
  • Millie, A. and Bullock, K. (2013) ‘Policing in a time of contraction and constraint: Re-imagining the role and function of contemporary policing’, Criminology and Criminal Justice, 13(2) 133-142.
  • Peters, E. (2013) ‘The Weight of My Words’: The Role of Confession and Surveillance in Parenting Programmes, Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law 34:4, 411-424.
  • Baker, H. (2012) ‘Problematising the Relationship between Parent Abuse and Teenage Boys: Constructions of Masculinity and Violence’, Social Policy and Society, Vol. 11(2), pp.265-276.
  • Baker, H. (2012) ‘Exploring How Teenage Boys Are Constructed in Relation to Parent Abuse’, Criminal Justice Matters, Vol. 87(1), pp.48-49.
  • Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2012) ‘Dark Tourism and the Prison’, Prison Service Journal, No 199, pp. 44-49.
  • Davies, J.T. (2012) ‘Community Justice and the Big Society’, The Justice Gap, at http://thejusticegap.com/News/community-justice-and-the-big-society.
  • Davis, H. (2012) ‘The Performance of Shock and the Ubiquity of Cover-Up’, British Society of Criminology Newsletter, 71, 21-24.
  • Davis, H. (2012) ‘Contextual Challenges for Crisis Support in the Immediate Aftermath of Major Incidents in the UK’, British Journal of Social Work, 43(3) 504-521.
  • Hobson, A. (2012) ‘The Political (Mis)management of Homo)sexuality and (In)securities’, Criminal Justice Matters, vol. 88, 4-6.
  • Millie, A. (2012) ‘Police stations, architecture and public reassurance’, British Journal of Criminology, 52(6) 1092-1112.
  • Millie, A. and Bullock, K. (2012) ‘Re-imaging policing post-austerity’, British Academy Review, 19, 16-18.
  • Peters, E. (2012) ‘Social Work and Social Control in the Third Sector: Re-Educating Parents in the Voluntary Sector Practice, Social Work in Action, Volume 24, Issue 4.
  • Peters, E. (2012) ‘I Blame the Mother: Educating Parents and the Gendered Nature of Parenting Orders’, Gender and Education, 24.1.
  • Tobin, A. (2012) ‘Widows and Community Based Transitional Justice in Post-Genocide Rwanda’, British Journal of Community Justice, 10(1).
  • Barton, A. (2011) ‘A Woman’s Place? Uncovering Maternalistic Forms of Governance in a 19th Century Reformatory’, Family and Community History, 14 (2) 89-104.
  • Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2011), ‘Dartmoor: Penal and Cultural Icon’, Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 50(5) 478-491.
  • Davies, J.T. (2011) ‘Gossip: Harmless Fun or Malevolent Presence?’, Criminal Justice Matters, 85 pp. 6-7.
  • Davis, H. (2011) ‘A Critical Evaluation of Crisis Support Arrangements in a UK Local Authority’, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 19:9.
  • Dunbabin, H. (2011) ‘Child Criminals in the Media: An Analysis of Media Constructions of ‘Child Criminals’ and a Critical Analysis of the Consequences’ The Internet Journal of Criminology. 
  • Kinsella, C. (2011) ‘Welfare, Exclusion and Rough Sleeping in Liverpool’, International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 31(5/6) pp 240-252.
  • Kinsella, C. and McGarry, J. (2011) ‘Computer Says No: Technology and Accountability in Policing Traffic Stops’ 55 Crime, Law and Social Change167-184.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Value judgments and criminalization’, British Journal of Criminology, 51(2) 278-295.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Big society, small government: The British coalition government and tackling anti-social behaviour’, Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 13(4) 284-287.
  • Moore, S. and Millie, A. (2011) Special Issue: Community Safety in Europe, Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 13(4).
  • Moore, S. and Millie, A. (2011) ‘Editorial: Community safety politics and policy in Europe’, Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 13(4) 229-231.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Whatever happened to reassurance policing?’ Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 4(3) 225–232.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Moral politics, moral decline and anti-social behaviour’, People, Place and Policy Online, 4(1) 6-13.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘“It’s time to move beyond the ASBO”: The Coalition and anti-social behaviour’, Howard League Early Career Academics Bulletin, Issue 6, 9-12.
  • Baker, H. (2009), ‘’Potentially Violent Men?’ Teenage Boys, Access to Refuges and Constructions of Men, Masculinity and Violence’, The Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, December, Vol. 31(4), pp. 435-450.
  • Ruxton, S. and Baker, H. (2009) ‘Editorial: Father’s Rights, Fatherhood and Masculinity/ies’  The Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, Vol. 31, Issue 4, pp. 351-55.
  • Baker, H. (2008) ‘Constructing Women who Experience Male Violence: Criminal Legal Discourse and Individual Experiences’  The Liverpool Law Review, Vol. 29, Issue 2, pp. 123-42.
  • Carline, A. and Baker, H. (2008) ‘Socio-Legal Studies in Liverpool Law Schools: Introduction’ The Liverpool Law Review, Vol. 29, Issue 2, pp. 117-121.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Anti-social behaviour, behavioural expectations and an urban aesthetic’, British Journal of Criminology, 48(3) 379-394.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Crime as an issue during the 2005 UK General Election’, Crime, Media, Culture, 4(1) 101-111.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Vulnerability and risk: Some lessons from the UK Reducing Burglary Initiative’, Police Practice and Research, 9(3) 183-198.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Anti-social behaviour in British cities’, Geography Compass, 2(5) 1681-1696.

Book Chapters

  • Millie, A. (2013) ‘Replacing the ASBO: An opportunity to stem the flow into the Criminal Justice System’, in A. Dockley and I. Loader (ed.) The Penal Landscape: The Howard League Guide to Criminal Justice in England and Wales, London: Routledge.
  • Barton, A. and Cooper, V. (2012) ‘Hostels and Community Justice for Women: The ‘Semi-penal’ Paradox’, in M. Malloch and G. McIvor (eds.) ‘Women, Punishment and Social Justice: Human Rights and Penal Practices’, London: Routledge.
  • Millie, A. and Moore, S. (2011) ‘Crime, Anti-social Behaviour and Education: A Critical Review’, in C. Hayden and D. Martin (eds.) ‘Crime, Anti-Social Behaviour and Schools’, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Respect and City Living: Urban Contest or Cosmopolitanism?’, in A. Millie (ed.) ‘Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK’, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Introduction’, in A. Millie (ed.) ‘Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK’, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Conclusions: Promoting Mutual Respect and Empathy’, in A. Millie (ed.) ‘Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK’, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Interview with Ken Moroney, Commissioner of New South Wales Police, Australia’, in D. Das and O. Marenin (eds.) ‘Trends in Policing: Interviews with Police Leaders Across the Globe’, Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.
  • Millie, A., Jacobson, J. and Hough, M. (2009) ‘Understanding the Growth in the Prison Population in England and Wales’, Reprinted in: T. Newburn (ed.) ‘Key Readings in Criminology’, Cullompton: Willan.
  • Jacobson, J., Millie, A. and Hough, M. (2008) ‘Why Tackle Anti-social Behaviour?’, in P. Squires (ed.) ‘ASBO Nation: The Criminalisation of Nuisance’, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. and Das, D. (2008) ‘Education and Training in Four Countries: Getting Rule of Law Messages Across’, in K. Aromaa and S. Redo (eds.) ‘For the Rule of Law: Criminal Justice Training and Teaching Across the World’, Helsinki: HEUNI (The European Institute for Crime Prevention and Control, affiliated with the United Nations).

Research Reports

  • Mackenzie, S., Bannister, J., Flint, J., Parr, S., Millie, A. and Fleetwood, J. (2010) ‘The Drivers of Perceptions of Anti-Social Behaviour’, Home Office Research Report 34, London: Home Office.
  • McGovern, M. and Tobin, A. (2010) ‘Countering Terror or Counter-Productive? Comparing Irish and British Muslim Experiences of Counter-insurgency Law & Policy’, Report of a Symposium Organised in Co-operation with Committee on the Administration of Justice, Islamic Human Rights Commission, Relatives for Justice and Coiste Na n-Larchimi, Edge Hill University.
  • Davis, H. (2009) ‘Intervening in Emergency: A Critical Evaluation’, A Local Authority Research Report.

Conference Papers and other Invited Presentations

  • Hobson, A. (2013) The Governance of Young Males with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) within the Youth Justice System, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Wolverhampton, July 2013.
  • Millie, A. (2013) ‘Urban interventionism and aesthetic (dis)order’, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Wolverhampton, July 2013.
  • Barton, A. & Brown, A. (2012) ‘Prison Tourism and the Search for Ethical Authenticity’, Criminal Justice, History and Activism Conference, University of Liverpool, June 2012.
  • Millie, A. (2012) Beauty and Criminalization, Inaugual Lecture Series, Edge Hill University, May 2012.
  • Millie, A. (2012) Expansion (and contraction) of British Policing, Invited Paper, The Home Office, London, January 2012.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Expansion (and contraction) of British policing’, Policing in a time of contraction and constraint: Re-imagining the role and function of contemporary policing, Invited Paper, the British Academy, London, September 2011.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Value judgments and anti-social behaviour’, International Expert Meeting ‘Tackling Perceived ASB, Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice, Amsterdam, June 2011.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Understanding anti-social behaviour’, Invited Paper, The Scottish Institute for Policing Research Workshop for Analysts, University of Dundee, May 2011.
  • Millie, A. (2011) ‘Value judgments and criminalization’, Invited Paper, Department of Urban Studies Workshop Series, University of Glasgow, February 2011.
  • Canning, V. and Tobin, A. (2010), ‘War, Women, Rape & Asylum’The Silent Majority: Sexual Violence and the Oppression of Womankind Conference, Liverpool John Moores University, March 2010.
  • Canning, V. and Tobin, A. (2010), ‘Policy, Impunity, Safety and Community: Women, Rape and Asylum’, Amnesty International Conference, University of Leeds, January 2010.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Whose order? Questioning value judgements on (anti-social) behaviour’, Disorder and Anti-Social Behaviour: Perception, Policy and Practice, The Scottish Institute for Policing Research, Invited Paper, School of Law, University of Edinburgh, November 2010.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Anti-social behaviour: Is it time to lose control?’ From School Exclusion Orders to Anti Terror Laws: Human Rights & the Use of Law in the Modern State, Invited Paper, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London, October 2010.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Value judgement, urban aesthetics and criminalisation’, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Leicester, July 2010.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Crime and urban aesthetics’, Invited Paper, Department of Urban Studies Workshop Series, University of Glasgow, March 2010.
  • Millie, A. (2010) ‘Enforcing beauty: Urban aesthetics and anti-social behaviour’, Invited Paper, School of Law Seminar Series, Swansea University, February 2010.
  • Kinsella, C. (2009), ‘An analysis of Liverpool City Council’s Homelessness Strategy’, School of Sociology and Social Policy Postgraduate Conference, University of Liverpool, September 2009.
  • Kinsella, C. (2009), ‘Researching Rough Sleepers: Pre-research Anxieties for the Postgraduate Researcher’, ‘Breaking Boundaries’ Postgraduate Research Conference, University of Warwick, March 2009.
  • Kinsella, C. and McGarry, J. (2009), ‘Computer Says No: Technology and Police Stops’, Conference on Police Governance and Accountability: Challenges and Outlook, Centre for Criminal Justice, School of Law, University of Limerick, December 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Community safety impact evaluation’, Invited Paper, Home Office Midlands Researcher and Analyst Network (MiRAN) Workshop, Birmingham, December 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Respect, civility and aesthetics’, (in a joint panel on civility, criminology and philosophy, with R. Sparks and S. Mackenzie), British Society of Criminology Conference, Cardiff University and University of Glamorgan, July 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Playing by the rules: The post-Blair anti-social behaviour agenda’, (in a joint panel on ASB, with A. Crawford and D. Prior) British Society of Criminology Conference, Cardiff University and University of Glamorgan, July 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) “Whatever happened to reassurance policing?” The Public Gets What the Public Wants: Conference on Public Trust and Confidence in the Police, Invited Paper, City University London, June 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘Youth and anti-social behaviour’, ESRC Situating Anti-Social Behaviour and Respect Day Conference, Invited Paper, King’s College London, April 2009.
  • Millie, A. (2009) ‘“Anti-social” behaviour and urban aesthetics in London and Toronto’, Invited Paper, Centre of Criminology Seminar Series, University of Toronto, April 2009.
  • Barton, A. (2008), ‘Walking the Line: Involvement, Intervention and Care of the Self in Critical Research’, the American Society of Criminology Conference, St Louis, USA.
  • Davies, J.T. (2008), ‘We Can Work it Out: Ethics and Duty of Care in the Research Process’, the American Society of Criminology Conference: Reinvigorating Theory Through Diversity and Inclusiveness, St Louis, USA, November 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Anti-social behaviour and urban aesthetics’, Invited Paper, Department of Social Sciences Seminar Series, Loughborough University, November 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Anti-social behaviour and urban aesthetics’, Invited Paper, Department of Applied Social Sciences Seminar Series, Lancaster University, October 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘How to behave in the city: The importance of aesthetics and style’, Conference on, Capital, Culture, Power: Criminalisation and Resistance, European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control, University of Liverpool/John Moores University, July 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘The police station: Exploring symbol and meaning in architecture and design’, British Society of Criminology Conference, University of Huddersfield, July 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘A critical review of anti-social behaviour policies and education’, Invited Paper, Managing Anti-Social Behaviour in Schools and Colleges Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, July 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Respect in the city: Behavioural expectations and urban anti-social behaviour’, Invited Paper,Department of Sociology Seminar Series, Surrey University, April 2008.
  • Millie, A. (2008) ‘Youth and public space’, Invited Paper, ESRC Seminar Series: Governing Through Anti-Social Behaviour, University of Brighton, January 2008.
  • Tobin, A. (2008), ‘Beekeeping as Transitional Justice in Post- Genocide Rwanda’, Critical Legal Conference, University of Glasgow, September 2008.

Police Research Unit (PRU)

The Police Research Unit was launched in 2017 and is a centre for research excellence in policing. Members of the PRU provide cutting edge independent research which aims to make evidence-based impacts on policy and practice at local, national and international levels. The PRU also provides opportunities for BA(Hons) Policing students to engage in cutting edge research.

Members

Professor Andrew Millie (Director)
(0)1695 657202
Andrew.millie@edgehill.ac.uk

Dr Steven Hirschler
(0)1695 654208
steven.hirschler@edgehill.ac.uk

Andrew Whittle
(0)1695 657378
 whittlea@edgehill.ac.uk

Lawrence Forrest
(0)1695 656376
 Lawrence.Forrest@edgehill.ac.uk

Research Projects

The attitudes, values and beliefs of police recruits
Project funder: Lancashire Constabulary, 2016-2018
Professor Andrew Millie and Dr Steven Hirschler

This project examines the attitudes, values and beliefs of new recruits as they join Lancashire Constabulary. The study focuses on whether the attitudes, values and beliefs of new recruits challenge police cultures, and the extent to which they become aligned to dominant norms and practices. A project summary and details of methodology can be found on the College of Policing Research Map

Project outputs 

    • Millie, A. (September 2017) ‘Attitudes, beliefs and values of new recruits within Lancashire Constabulary’, Lancashire Constabulary Evidence-Based Policing Research Champions Event, Lancashire Constabulary HQ.
    • Millie, A. (July 2017) ‘The attitudes, values and beliefs of police recruits’, British Society of Criminology Conference, Sheffield Hallam University.

Volunteering within the police

Project funder: Lancashire Constabulary, 2016
Professor Andrew Millie

Volunteering has long been a feature of the police and opportunities for volunteers are throughout the police service – including joining the ranks of the Special Constabulary or becoming a Police Support Volunteer (PSV). This research explores why some people volunteer for the police, issues regarding their recruitment, management and supervision and factors that might inhibit or reinforce successful outcomes. A summary of this project is available on the College of Policing ‘What Works Crime Reduction’ website .

 Project outputs

  • Millie, A. (2018) ‘Citizens in policing: The lived reality of being a Police Support Volunteer’, Policing and Society.
  • Millie, A. (2018) ‘The beliefs and values of police volunteers’, in K. Bullock and A. Millie (eds.) The Special Constabulary: Historical Context, International Comparisons and Contemporary Themes, Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Millie, A. (2016) Research on volunteering within the police, College of Policing What Works Crime Reduction Website, Available at: http://whatworks.college.police.uk/About/News/Pages/volunteers.aspx
  • Millie, A. (2016) Volunteering within the Police: Experiences of Special Constables and Police Support Volunteers, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk.
  • Millie, A. (2016) Volunteering within the Police: Summary, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk.
  • Millie, A. (July 2016) ‘Life as a volunteer for the police’, British Society of Criminology Conference, Nottingham Conference Centre.

 

Policing in a time of contraction and constraint: Re-imagining the role and function of contemporary policing
Project funder: British Academy, 2011
Professor Andrew Millie and Professor Karen Bullock (University of Surrey)

The starting point for this project was the nature and scale of the fiscal challenge facing state-funded police forces in Britain following the financial crisis. Public sector cuts had immediate implications for the police service with a 20 per cent reduction in funding by 2014/2015 (HM Treasury, 2010). The project received funding for a day conference held at the British Academy in London with the following speakers: Andrew Millie (Edge Hill University), Karen Bullock (Surrey University), Ben Bowling (King’s College London), Robert Reiner (London School of Economics), Mike Hough (Birkbeck, University of London), Simon Holdaway (University of Sheffield), and Nick Tilley (University College London). Discussion was led by Betsy Stanko (Metropolitan Police), John Graham (the Police Foundation), and P.A.J. Waddington (University of Wolverhampton). Professor Millie’s work in this area led to an invitation to contribute towards Lord Stevens’ Independent Review of Policing. A project summary was published in the British Academy Review and can be found

Project outputs

 

  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘What are the police for? Re-thinking policing post-austerity’, in J. Brown (ed.) The Future of Policing, London: Routledge.
  • Millie, A. (2014) ‘The case for a narrower focus to policing’, The Great Debate: How Wide or Narrow Should the Police’s Remit Be? Public Safety Leadership Research Focus, 2(4) 1-4. Australian Institute for Police Management.
  • Millie, A. (2013) ‘The policing task and the expansion (and contraction) of British policing’, Criminology and Criminal Justice, 13(2) 143-160.
  • Millie, A. and Bullock, K. (2013) ‘Policing in a time of contraction and constraint: Re-imagining the role and function of contemporary policing’, Criminology and Criminal Justice (Special Issue Editorial), 13(2) 133-142.
  • Millie, A. and Bullock, K. (2012) ‘Re-imagining Policing Post-Austerity’, British Academy Review, Issue 19, 16-18.
  • Millie, A. (October 2014) ‘How wide or narrow should the police’s remit be?’ Plenary, 2nd International Conference on Law Enforcement and Public Health, VU University, Amsterdam.
  • Millie, A. (January 2012) ‘Expansion (and contraction) of British policing’, The Home Office, London.
  • Millie, A. (September 2011) ‘Expansion (and contraction) of British policing’, Policing in a time of contraction and constraint: re-imagining the role and function of contemporary policing, The British Academy, London.

 

 

Events

2016-2017
8 February 2017
I4P and Department of Law & Criminology Annual Policing Lecture
Policing Gender and Ethics: An Ethnographic View of Culture and Practice
Dr Louise Westmarland, The Open University

2015-2016
10 December 2015
I4P and Department of Law & Criminology Annual Policing Lecture
The Recent Politics of the Police: Re-Professionalisation and Regulation
Professor Simon Holdaway, University of Sheffield

Contact

The PRU welcomes proposals for study at MRes or PhD, as well as enquiries for collaborative ventures.

To contact the Police Research Unit, please email Professor Andrew Millie

Police Research Unit
Department of Law and Criminology
Edge Hill University
St Helens Road
Ormskirk, Lancashire
L39 4QP
United Kingdom

(0)1695 657202
Andrew.millie@edgehill.ac.uk

 

Power, Discourse & Harm Research Unit

Power, Discourse & Harm Research Unit

The Power, Discourse and Harm Research Unit was established in 2015 and provides a network for colleagues who are engaged in research around the inter-relationship between: state/corporate power and state/corporate discourse; and an examination of their impacts through the lenses of zemiology (study of social harms) and agnotology (deliberate construction of social ignorance). The focus of the Unit is ‘institutional power’, or to use David Whyte’s (2009) definition, the “form of power transmitted through state institutions and private business organisations or companies”.

Members

The work of the Unit relates directly to teaching on modules CRI1104 Generating Criminological Knowledge; CRI3105 Expanding the Criminological Imagination; and CRI3106 Crimes of the Powerful.

Recent publications and conference papers

Barton, A., Davis, H. and Scott, D. (forthcoming) ‘Quietly Silenced: Restricting the Criminological Imagination in the Neoliberal University in Diver, A. (Ed) Employable Scholars in Higher Education: Challenges and Choices in Times of Austerity. Springer

Barton, A. and Davis, H. (Eds) (forthcoming, 2018) Ignorance, Power and Harm: The Study of Agnotology and the Criminological Imagination, Palgrave. In Press.

Barton, A., Davis, H. and White, H. (forthcoming, 2018) ‘Agnotology and the Criminological Imagination’ in Barton, A. and Davis, H. (Eds) Ignorance, Power and Harm: The Study of Agnotology and the Criminological Imagination, Palgrave. In Press.

Elfleet, H. (2018). ‘Women’s Centres: Gender Responsive Services for Formerly Imprisoned Women Post Corston Report (2007)’. Howard League for Penal Reform, ECAN Bulletin. Issue 35, 17-22.

Elfleet, H. (2017). ‘Empowered to be Resilient: Neo-Liberal Penal Rhetoric and the Corston Report (2007)’. Prison Service Journal, 230, 33-38.

Elfleet, H. (2017) Post-Release Experiences after Corston (2007). In Fletcher, S., & White, H. (2017). Emerging Voices: Critical Social Research by European Group Postgraduate and Early Career Academics. London. EG Press Ltd

Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2015) ‘Show me the Prison: The Development of Prison Tourism in Britain’, Crime, Media, Culture, 11(3) 237-258.

Barton, A. and Brown, A. (2014) ‘Prison Tourism: History and Representation’, Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating the Criminal Past Conference, SOLON, Nottingham Galleries of Justice.

Barton, A. and Davis, H. (2015) ‘Neo-liberalism, Higher Education and Anti-Politics: The Assault on the Criminological Imagination’, in Frauley, J. (ed.), C Wright Mills and the Criminological Imagination, Farnham: Ashgate.

Barton, A. and Davis, H. (2013) ‘The Politics of Crime and the Crimes of Politics: Where Does Criminology Stand in the “War on the Poor”? European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control: Socio-Legal Newsletter (Special Edition).

Barton A, Corteen K, Scott D & Whyte D (eds) (2007) Expanding the Criminological Imagination: Critical Readings on Criminology, Willan

Davis, H. (2013) ‘Making Sense of Disaster: Towards a Contextual, Phased Understanding of Organisationally Based Acute Civilian Disasters’, British Journal of Criminology, 53:3, pp. 378-400.

Davis, H. (2012) ‘The Performance of Shock and the Ubiquity of Cover-Up’, British Society of Criminology Newsletter, 71, Winter

White, H. (2014) ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis: An Introduction to my PhD Research’ European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control: Summer Newsletter II.

White, H., Ryan, L., Wadsworth, C. and Williams, P. (2014) ‘Review of ‘The Prison and the Public’ Conference, Edge Hill University 2013, Prison Service Journal No 214.

White, H. (2014) ‘On the Road to Genocide? A Critical Analysis of the Neoliberal Narration of Crisis’, European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control 42nd Annual Conference, Liverpool John Moores University, September 2014.

White, H. (2014) ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis: An Introduction’, Postgraduate Stream of the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control Undergraduate Conference, John Moore’s University, April 2014.

White, H. (2014) ‘Poverty Porn: A Critical Analysis of Popular Media Representations of Benefit Claimants in a Culture of Blame’, Cutting Edge: Culture, Identity, Representation, Edge Hill University, March 2014.

Research in Action

Research in Action

Members of the Criminology Research Group and the Power, Discourse and Harm Research Unit are involved in important and innovative research on a range of topics. Summaries of some of their work are available here.

Power, Discourse & Harm Research Unit
Neo-liberalism and the criminological imagination
Disaster crime and crisis management
The prison and the public
Truth, justice and Hillsborough: A personal reflection

Policing Research
Re-imagining policing post-austerity
Reassurance policing
Police architecture

Children, Young People and Families
Parenting Orders and the criminalisation of parenting
Exploring the issue of parent abuse as a social problem

Crime and Place
Behavioural expectations and city living

Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology
Philosophical criminology
New horizons in criminology

PhD Students

PhD Students

Janice Devers - photoJan Adams

“Everyday morality and anti-social behaviour”
Supervisors: Professor Andrew Millie and Dr Leon Culbertson

Helen DunbabinHelen Elfleet (Graduate Teaching Assistant)

“The impact and experience of mental health problems on women in prison”
Supervisors: Dr Alana Barton, Dr Eleanor Peters and Professor Alyson Brown
dunbabinh@edgehill.ac.uk

 

Contact

Contact

Email Professor Andrew Millie (Convener of the Criminology Research Group)

Edge Hill University
Department of Law & Criminology
St Helens Road
Ormskirk
Lancashire
L39 4QP
United Kingdom
01695 657202

andrew.millie@edgehill.ac.uk