Archived Content

The following content has been archived and is available for historical reference.

ISR Public Event: 2nd July 2021

CONFERENCE:
Victims of Terrorism and State Responses

A full day online conference looking at how the
criminal justice system accommodates and assists
the victims of terrorism.

About

The Law and Criminology Department at Edge Hill University, alongside the Institute for Social Responsibility and in partnership with The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation have collaborated to present an interdisciplinary-based conference at Edge Hill University. The event is sponsored by The Modern Law Review Seminar Fund.

In collaboration with The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation, the conference will facilitate scholarly discussion on a wide range of pressing issues, focusing on the victims of terrorism and the level of support provided to those victims by the state. Including international and EU dialogue, the approach taken to this conference is impactful and direct in the sense that the scholarly discussion will focus on the changes that can be made in the practical sense to facilitate a better and more enhanced support network for victims of terrorism. Assisting in creating real-world discussion for Members of the European and UK Parliament, Police and Crime Commissioners, public sector stakeholders and law enforcement, this conference aims to prompt academic discussion, alongside support and enhancement of student learning for postgraduate and undergraduate in relevant fields.

The conference draws on expertise within the fields of law and policy, criminal justice, political science and religious studies. These areas are all affected by acts of terrorism and draw the inference of our social, legal and moral responsibilities. This is of particular importance given the lack of support provided by the state for victims of terrorism.

Following on from the above and fitting within the idea of social responsibility, the event moves forward to assess the alternative, and delves into the issues of radicalisation, de-radicalisation, rehabilitation and re-integration of those who have committed acts of terrorism, or who have been fighting in areas such as Syria surrounded by terrorist organisations.

During the conference, our speakers will focus on the issues facing victims of terrorism and the duties that are placed upon the state to support the surviving victims and their families, in terms of access to physical and psychological support, legal advice and compensation to the present victim, and pursing and preventing acts of terrorism for the potential future victim. Overall, an assessment will be made as to whether UK and EU Member States are doing enough.

The event will then draw upon expertise surrounding pursuing and preventing acts of terrorism. Many contentious issues will be debated such as the balance of protection and privacy. Our speakers will aim to equalise the overall duty of the State to protect the lives of its people, yet the safeguarding of individuals right to privacy.

This event takes place Online (a secure link will be distributed following registration).

 


Back to the top

Themes

The primary theme throughout is: Victims of terrorism: an interdisciplinary study into how the criminal justice system accommodates and assists the victims of terrorism. Secondarily, what the state can do to better to support victims following physical injury and damage to mental wellbeing is deliberated. This includes ideas surrounding restorative justice and compensation.

There will be two side themes focussing on how law and policy has evolved to prevent terrorist attacks, and how policing has been adapted to better pursue terrorists. Within these themes, speakers will also discuss the current conundrum facing the UK and EU Member States, regarding terrorist fighters currently imprisoned within Kurdish controlled Northern Syria, and whether or not they should be allowed to return to their state of origin.

 

 


Back to the top

Programme

Date: Friday 2nd July 2021
Venue: Online (a secure link will be distributed following registration).

Programme: (schedule subject to change)

Time Session
08:45 Entry to online conference waiting room
09:30 Welcome
Dr John Cater, Vice Chancellor of Edge Hill University & Professor Jo Crotty of the Institute of Social Responsibility.
09:40 Terry O’Hara, Tim Parry and Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation
Victims of Terrorism: What we do
10:00 Keynote: Lord Carlile of Berriew QC CBE
Reducing Potential Victims: Counter-Terrorism Investigations and Terrorists’ Use of Communications
10:25 Brian McNeill QPM 
Investigating Terrorist Attacks: The Role of the Senior Investigating Officer
10:45 Break (15mins)
11:00 James Hodder
The UK’s clear lack of compassion: Fighting for victims of terrorism to get legal aid
11:20 Figen Murray
The Impact of Terrorism and Beyond
11:40 Mary Prior QC
The Victims Drawn to Terror
12:00 Lunch Break (60mins)
13:00 Keynote Speaker, Dr David Lowe, Leeds Beckett University
A Prevent Strategy for Northern Ireland
13:30 Travis Frain
Mutual benefit: Incorporating Support for Victims and Survivors into Counter-Terrorism Strategy
14:00 Break (15mins)
14:15 Nichola Rew
Supporting the survivors: Experiences and perceptions of peer support offered to UK terrorist survivors
14:30 Professor Clive Walker and Christiane Rabenstein
Pensions for The Victims of the Troubles in Northern Ireland
15:00 Panel Discussion
15:30 Closing Comments
Keynote Speaker, Lord Carlile of Berriew
16:00 Close

 

 


Back to the top

Speakers

Keynote: Lord Carlile of Berriew QC CBE

Lord Carlile was the first, and longest serving UK Independent Reviewer of Anti-Terrorist Legislation after 9/11 and continues to take a close interest in Counter Terrorism issues and terrorist incidents. In July 2015 he was appointed as member of the Independent Commission on Freedom of Information. He was for several years the Independent Reviewer of National Security policy in Northern Ireland. From 1983 to 1997 he was a Liberal Democrat MP for Montgomeryshire. He served as spokesperson on a range of issues, including home affairs and the law, and was Leader of the Welsh Liberal Democrats from 1992 to 1997.  Lord Carlile was a founding member of the All-Party War Crimes Group. He chaired the Select Committee of both Houses of Parliament on mental health legislation. He was appointed a Life Peer in 1999 and was awarded the CBE in 2012 for services to national security.

Session title:

Reducing Potential Victims: Counter-Terrorism Investigations and Terrorists’ Use of Communications

Keynote: Dr David Lowe

David is a senior research fellow at Leeds law School in Leeds Beckett University researching terrorism & security, policing and criminal law. He is a retired police officer. During his police career he carried out a number of uniform and CID roles, retiring from Merseyside Police in 2007 where up to July 2017 he was a principal lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University’s Law School. Among his external roles, David is member of the UK’s Counter Terrorism Advisory Group and an external member of UK Parliament’s All-Party Parliamentary Committee on a Fit and Healthy Childhood where he advises on issues related to the Prevent strategy. His research has been widely published in books and articles including his book ‘Terrorism: Law and Policy’ where the second edition will be published by Routledge in September 2021. David is regularly requested by the mainstream national and international media (both radio and television) to provide commentary on issues related to terrorism, security and policing including the BBC, Sky News, CNN, RT, LBC and France 24. David also provides expert witness service where to date he has mainly assisted UK counter-terrorism policing agencies on terrorists’ use of tradecraft and state prosecutors in criminal law, including the Irish State Prosecutor in the Dwyer Appeal in February 2018 in relation to police access to telecommunications data and surveillance of electronic communications.

Session title:

A Prevent Strategy for Northern Ireland

Terry O’Hara

Within his role at the Tim Parry and Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation, Terry manages the ‘Survivors Assistance Network’ (SAN) a service providing practical and emotional support to victims of terrorism. As a professional in the third sector working in the field of the prevention of violent conflict, resolution and response to violent extremism and politically motivated violence, Terry is experienced in developing and delivering projects aimed at resolving conflict and enabling people to deal with traumatic experiences arising out of war and terrorism.

Session title:

Victims of Terrorism: What we do

Brian McNeill QPM

Senior Lecturer in Policing at Edge Hill University and previously the Head of the Continuous Professional Development (CPD) Department within the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies at Liverpool John Moores University. Brian retired from Merseyside Police in 2011 after 30 years service. His last position with that force was Detective Chief Superintendent – Head of Crime, prior to which he was Director of Intelligence, Head of Special Branch and Scientific Support. As an accredited Senior Investigating Officer he had responsibility for leading reactive and proactive investigations into all levels of homicide including Category A+ Murders, Counter Terrorism, corruption and covert operations into serious and organised crime. Since retirement, he has performed the role as Staff Officer to the National Policing Crime Business Area, which involved the oversight, coordination and support of 12 Portfolios and 119 National Working Groups with responsibility for national and strategic level issues around policy, guidance and training. More recently, he has been a member of the NPCC National Coordination Team for all police forces in relation to the Public Inquiry into Undercover Policing. Brian has been commended on 22 occasions and was awarded the Queens Police Medal in the New Year Honours List in 2011 for 30 years distinguished police service.

Session title:

Investigating Terrorist Attacks: The Role of the Senior Investigating Officer

James Hodder

James has been campaigning for the UK Government to provide legal aid to the families of those killed in a terrorist attack. James unfortunately lost his partner due to the terror attack on London Bridge in 2017. James will focus on his personal experience of not receiving legal aid and the impact that had on him emotionally, from filling in the legal aid request forms all the way through to his campaign. Along with his legal team, his presentation will focus on legal aid provision and the changes required to ensure legal representation through a process that appears to lack compassion to begin with.

Session title:

The UK’s clear lack of compassion: Fighting for victims of terrorism to get legal aid

Figen Murray

Figen Murray is the mother of Martyn Hett, who at 29 years of age was tragically killed in the terrorist attack at the Manchester Arena in May 2017. Before his death Figen worked as a counsellor, supervisor, and life coach, but since has stepped down from her profession. Following this decision Figen is now committed to her mission of promoting peace, kindness and tolerance in Martyn’s memory, while also working towards tangible changes that can help ensure no other family has to go through what hers did. Driven by the same values that underpinned her work, she has continued to use her influence to create and promote a strong counter-narrative to extremism and hate. Over the last three years she has been vocal both in national and local media, appearing on radio and television, speaking at events as well as writing insightful opinion pieces. Figen commits her time to talk to young people in schools, colleges and universities educating them about the dangers of radicalisation. She has so far spoken to more than 7,500 secondary school pupils across England, urging them to confront the terrible impact of the Manchester bombing, and raising awareness of the extremism behind it. Her talks also aim to show the youth of today how they can positively influence and shape their world, encouraging those in attendance to think about acts of kindness whilst at school and outside of it. Figen is also the force behind Martyn’s Law, a legislation requiring entertainment venues to improve security against the threat of terrorism, and one that requires that all venues in Manchester have a counter-terrorism plan. Her petition to make Martyn’s Law mandatory has received over 23,000 signatures and is now on its way to becoming a reality.  She has also just been presented with the Outstanding Contribution award at the 2020 Counter Terror Awards for her efforts in stopping terrorism.

Session title:

The Impact of Terrorism and Beyond

Mary Prior QC

A Criminal QC with especial expertise in questioning and representation of the most vulnerable members of society, with a particular focus on those on the autism spectrum, with ADHD and with personality disorders. Instructed in homicide, especially involving the death of a child or spouse, serious sexual offences, child sexual exploitation, organised crime groups involving firearms and drugs. Advocacy trainer, lecturer in all aspects of law, RASSO trainer for the Midland Circuit. vulnerable witness advocacy trainer. Co-chair of the Leicestershire Schools Courts Competition. Co-chair of Women in Criminal Law – Midlands. Chair of the Midland Circuit Social Mobility Programme. Visiting Professional Fellow Aston University.

Session title:

The Victims Drawn to Terror

Travis Frain

Research Fellow and Team Lead for Domestic Counterterrorism. Rise to Peace Advisory Board Member, Counter Terrorism Policing. Whilst in his first year as a student at Edge Hill University, Travis was injured in the Westminster Bridge attack in March 2017. Since then, he has campaigned for improvements to state provided support for victims of terrorism – co-founding the pressure group Survivors Against Terror in 2018 – in addition to delivering talks in schools about radicalisation, and sitting on the advisory boards of Counter Terrorism Policing and the National Emergencies Trust.

Session title:

Mutual benefit: Incorporating Support for Victims and Survivors into Counter-Terrorism Strategy

Nichola Rew

Nichola has worked in UK policing for the last 20 years and is a final year PhD student at the University of Portsmouth Institute of Criminal Justice Studies. Her current research explores the cognitive processing of terror attacks on police first responders who attended the London Bridge 2017 attack. Previous research has included work with UK based victims of terrorist attacks, both within the UK and abroad, focusing on preferred avenues of support. Nichola is an editorial board member of the College of Policing academic journal ‘Going Equipped’ which aims to bring academia and policing together and regularly writes for several leading academic journals in the field of terrorism.

Session title:

Supporting the survivors: Experiences and perceptions of peer support offered to UK terrorist survivors

Professor Emeritus Clive Walker, LLB., PhD, LLD., Solicitor, QC (Hon)

Clive Walker is Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice Studies at the School of Law, University of Leeds, where he has served as the Director of the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies and as Head of School. He has written extensively on constitutional, terrorism, and internet issues. In 2003, he was appointed as a special adviser to the UK Parliamentary select committee which scrutinised what became the Civil Contingencies Act 2004, following which he published The Civil Contingencies Act 2004: Risk, Resilience and the Law in the United Kingdom (Oxford University Press, 2006). His books on terrorism are recognised and cited widely and include Terrorism and the Law (Oxford University Press, 2011), The Anti‐Terrorism Legislation, (3rd ed., Oxford University Press, 2014), the Routledge Handbook of Law and Terrorism (Routledge, 2015), and (with Gurulé and King) the Palgrave Handbook of Criminal and Terrorism Financing Law (2018). He was appointed in 2010 by the Home Office as Senior Adviser to the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation. Overseas research work and collaborations have resulted in many visiting professorships and other appointments, including at George Washington University (1995), the University of Connecticut (2003), Stanford University (2006), University of Melbourne (2007), Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (University of London) (2009), University of New South Wales (2012), the University of Toronto (2017), and the International Centre for Counter Terrorism (The Hague, 2020).

Session title:

Pensions for The Victims of the Troubles in Northern Ireland

Christiane Rabenstein

After studying law at the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg/Germany, she obtained a Master of Laws at the University of Leicester and then completed her legal training in Germany. She worked as senior researcher at the Max-Planck-Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg/Germany where she became head of the section Common Law Countries and took part in a number of projects including “Judicial Control of Europol” and “National Prosecution of International Crimes”. Christiane is a Legal Adviser at PNLD, the Police National Legal Database, and co-author of Blackstone’s Counter-Terrorism Handbook.

Session title:

Pensions for The Victims of the Troubles in Northern Ireland

 

 


Back to the top

Registration

Date: Friday 2nd July 2021
Venue: Online (a secure link will be distributed following registration).

Registration: This event is FREE but please click here to register your place.

 

 

 

 


More ISR Events

Last updated on Last updated on Was this page helpful? Yes No Thanks for your feedback! Please tell us more: