I4P Public Lecture – Professor Stephen Case, Loughborough University

16th Mar 2017, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Faculty of Education

‘Positive Youth Justice: Children First, Offenders Second‘

The Children First, Offenders Second (CFOS) model evolves youth justice beyond its contemporary risk focus and promotes a positive, principled, progressive and practical approach to the treatment of children in the Youth Justice System. The measurement, assessment and amelioration of the risk children present to themselves and others underpins and drives contemporary youth justice processes. However, the utility of the risk paradigm has been overstated and is incapable of sustaining the faith placed in it as the guiding principle for animating youth justice practice. Nevertheless, there is at present no consensus about what approach to youth justice should or can replace risk as the driver of policy and practice.

This paper outlines the CFOS model as a manifesto for changing the Youth Justice System – a modern, economic-normative paradigm founded on central guiding principles for positive youth justice practice – child-friendly and child-appropriate, rights-focused treatment, diversion, inclusionary prevention, participation and engagement, legitimacy, the promotion of positive behaviour and outcomes, evidence-based partnership, systems management and the responsibilisation of adults. Therefore, CFOS constitutes a blueprint for a distinctive, principled, progressive approach to working with children; one that can be adopted and adapted by local authority areas throughout England and Wales, and by other nation states across the UK, Europe and beyond.

The evolution, trajectory and practical realisation of CFOS positive youth justice will be discussed and animated with evidence from a twenty-year programme of associated reflective research in Swansea and the emerging success of an integrated, holistic and child-friendly delivery model in Surrey

This I4P Public Lecture is in association with the Faculty of Health and Social Care, and the Department of Law & Criminology.

Programme:

  • 5.30pm – Registration and Refreshments
  • 6.00pm – Lecture
  • 7.00pm – Reception and Networking

Profile

Professor Case is a criminologist in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough University. He specialises in youth justice issues, particularly the implementation of ‘children first’, ‘positive’ practice models that challenge the negative, risk-based approaches of post Crime and Disorder Act youth justice. Stephen is the co-author (with Professor Kevin Haines) of ‘Positive Youth Justice: Children First, Offenders Second’ (2015, Policy Press) and ‘Understanding Youth Offending: Risk Factor Research, Policy and Practice’ (2009, Willan). He has published numerous academic articles in multi-disciplinary, international journals, including Youth Justice, Children and Society, the Howard Journal and the Journal of Substance Use. Professor Case has conducted research for the Youth Justice Board, the Home Office, the Welsh Government, the National Institute for Health and Social Care Research and the Wales Office for Research and Development, including leading the national evaluation of the Welsh Government’s youth inclusion strategy ‘Extending Entitlement’.

Book Review

‘Positive Youth Justice: Children First, Offenders Second’ by Stephen Case, Kevin Haines and Stephen Case (Policy Press, 2015)

Sean Creaney, Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behaviour, Edge Hill University said “As Professor Case critically notes, the views of ‘offenders’ are often rendered invalid as intervention is often done ‘to’ them, not ‘with’ them. Positive youth justice: children first, offenders second is an innovative model, developed with children, families and practitioners. Crucially, their accounts were prioritised and given legitimacy. Despite the barriers of diminishing resources, existing cultural challenges, procedural and bureaucratic systems, their model should be welcomed because it transcends youth justice and is applicable to those with an interest in health and social care.”

Sean Creaney, Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behaviour, Edge Hill University said “As Professor Case critically notes, the views of ‘offenders’ are often rendered invalid as intervention is often done ‘to’ them, not ‘with’ them. Positive youth justice: children first, offenders second is an innovative model, developed with children, families and practitioners. Crucially, their accounts were prioritised and given legitimacy. Despite the barriers of diminishing resources, existing cultural challenges, procedural and bureaucratic systems, their model should be welcomed because it transcends youth justice and is applicable to those with an interest in health and social care.”

Read the full review on The Times Higher website