Faculty of Education Seminar

2nd May 2014, 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Faculty of Health, Social Care and Medicine

Teaching open event

Visualising inclusion: Employing a visual methodology to explore views of inclusion

Dr Linda Dunne, Dr Fiona Hallett, Virginia Kay, Dr Clare Woolhouse

In the session we will be outlining the theory and method that underpins conducting research using photo elicitation. We will then be presenting the group with a number of anonymised photographs (our current data) and asking them for their views on the ways in which they feel the images might represent inclusion or exclusion, before leading a broader discussion around data analysis focusing on what inclusion and exclusion means to those working in educational settings, based on the comments we have already received from pupils, trainees and academics.

Abstract
The primary objective of the research we are conducting is to enable the development of cross-cultural research in Inclusive Education and Special Educational Needs. The first phase of research (2013/2014), which we discuss in this session, involves a comparative analysis of the views of young people about the meaning of ‘Inclusion’ in different national contexts.
We have recruited a number of primary schools, secondary schools and further education colleges in the UK, Australia and in South Africa to become part of the project. Once recruited, we have been giving disposable cameras to teachers so that their class of pupils/students can follow the guidance we provide and take images that they feel capture what they understand to be the meanings of inclusion and / or exclusion.
All the images are anonymised and we use a software package to ‘cartoonise’ them. These images are then shared with a different class of similar aged pupils/students, trainee teachers and academics to ascertain whether and how their views about inclusion and/or exclusion differ. In doing so we want to access the differences in the perspectives of pupils and teachers by exploring how they construct meaning through the photographs they take or the comments they add to the images we provide. We are not interested in how well a particular institution is able to encourage inclusion, but want to focus on children’s perceptions of what inclusion and exclusion mean for them in their everyday lives.

The research analysis we then apply to the photographs and the additional responses we receive include questions around:

  • What are the dominant views of inclusion and exclusion?
  • What is said through the production of the photographs, who is speaking who is listening?
  • How are particular perspectives regarding inclusion naturalised and what ‘truths’ are proposed?
  • What discourse(s), myths or narratives are reproduced?
  • Does engagement with the research alter perceptions?

In the session we will be outlining the theory and method that underpins conducting research using photo elicitation. We will then be presenting the group with a number of anonymised photographs (our current data) and asking them for their views on the ways in which they feel the images might represent inclusion or exclusion, before leading a broader discussion around data analysis focusing on what inclusion and exclusion means to those working in educational settings, based on the comments we have already received from pupils, trainees and academics.

Further information is available here or contact Dr David Allan