Department of Social Sciences Seminar Series 2013-2014

4th Dec 2013, 1:15pm - 2:30pm

Edge Hill University

The Engagement with and Practices of Mobility among Teenagers in Returned Albanian Families – Dr Zana Vathi

Albanian flag boy

The economic crisis in Greece, where many Albanian migrants have migrated to since the beginning of the 1990s, is affecting the lives of migrants and is catalizing their return to Albania. To date, little is known about this phenomenon. The number of returnees reported recently by the Albanian Government is 62639 in 2009 and 50735 in 2010 from Greece alone (Government of Albania 2010). Some press articles maintain that the children of migrants are feeling alienated and experiencing difficulties in what is a new environment to them. This paper focuses on the return to Albania and engagement with mobility of the Albanian-origin children. The paper draws from 60 interviews conducted in the capital and provincial towns and villages with teenagers of the age of 12-19 who have recently returned to Albania. Findings show that teenagers engage with mobility imaginatively, discursively and practically. Mobility and travel are either regretted as part of the sacrifice of return, or engaged with by taking the form of visits to friends and relatives in Greece, or as aspirations to travel and relocate when reaching adulthood. These narratives show return as a crucial process in re-shaping minors’ experience and understanding of mobility as a constitutive part of their lives. They experience a decreased daily mobility, but an increase of their engagement with mobility discursively and in terms of travel to their previous localities. Contextual differences are evident in the teenagers’ practices of mobility, depending on whether they are settling in Tirana or in the provincial areas of the country.

No need to book just drop in.  For further information please email Paul Reynolds

 

 

 

Department of Social Sciences Seminar Series 2013-2014

23rd Oct 2013, 1:15pm - 2:30pm

Edge Hill University

Department of Social Sciences Seminar Series 2013-2014

The Life Value of the Experience of Time as Free – Professor Jeff Noonan, University of Windsor, Canada

Human individuals exist, live, and develop within natural fields of life-support and social fields of life-development.  The experience of both fields is shaped by the consciousness of time they engender.  As natural organisms, human beings must confront their mortality, while as social self-conscious agents they must make definite choices about the forms of experience, activity, and interaction they will pursue over a finite lifetime. The goodness of human life is a function of the quality of the experiences, activities, and modes of interaction actually realized within a given life.  In general, the wider and deeper our capacities for experience, activity, and interaction are developed, the better any given life is.  These capacities can be narrowed and constrained by forms of social life which are materially impoverished (denying the poor the material resources they require to develop their capacities), and/or politically, socially, and culturally exclusionary, oppressive, and hierarchical (denying demonized minorities the social space in which the express and enjoy their differences).  This paper will argue that good lives for finite, mortal beings require, in addition to comprehensive and universal satisfaction of the material and social conditions of life as socially self-conscious agents, as much experience of lifetime as free as possible.  The experience of time as free is the experience of time as an open matrix of possibilities for life-valuable activity and experience. The expression and enjoyment of capacities can be narrowed and constrained by social experiences of time as structured by coercive and routinized practices, even in cases where material and socio-cultural and political requirements for wide and deep capacity realisation and enjoyment are (at least in principle) overcome. Politically and economically, the expansion of the experience of time as free requires the progressive overcoming of capitalist work and leisure routines; philosophically and ethically it requires the transcendence of egocentric consumerism; goals which are organically connected through social self-conscious commitment to democratic political movements.

No need to book just drop in.  For further information please email Paul Reynolds