Dr Kym Brindle

Senior Lecturer in English Literature

Department of English, History & Creative Writing

Profile

I joined Edge Hill as an Associate Tutor in 2004 and am now Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Literature. I gained a first degree in English at Edge Hill followed by an MA in Contemporary Literary Studies from Lancaster University. I have a PhD from Lancaster University for an Arts Council funded study of Neo-Victorian fiction. I have led a wide variety of courses on contemporary literature at Edge Hill and also taught an extensive range of modules on nineteenth-century literature. I have a new second year module on Contemporary American Fiction that is offered to students for the first time in 2017. In addition, I am an established team-teaching member for two large first year literature modules at the University. I am also Level Six Year Tutor.

The main focus of my academic research is Neo-Victorian fiction and my publications in this area include a 2014 book, Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction: Diaries and Letters. My research reaches a range of contemporary literature audiences ranging from international Gothic to middle-brow women’s writing. I have published essays on literary theory, mid-twentieth-century women writers, American fiction, and Neo-Victorian and the Gothic. I have recently contributed a book chapter on the materiality of letter writing in a digital age and another on postcards in the fiction of American writer, Annie Proulx. My new research project is an investigation of letter strategies in Twentieth-Century Women Writers’ fiction. This research is taking shape with delivery of a conference paper on Muriel Spark  this year and an honorarium award for a talk on Barbara Pym at Harvard University in 2018.

Publications

Monograph

Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction: Diaries and Letters (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)

Chapters in Edited Collection

‘Wish I was There: Economies of Communication in Annie Proulx’s Postcards and ‘Brokeback Mountain’’, in The Epistolary Renaissance: a Handbook to Contemporary Letter Narratives in Anglophone Fiction, ed. By Maria Löschnigg and Rebekka Schuh (Berlin, Boston: DeGruyter, 2017). In process.

‘‘Traced azure on her hand’: The Material Trace of Handwriting in Neo-Victorian fiction’, in Fluidities and Transformations: (Neo)Victorianisms in the Twenty-First Century, ed. by Rosario Arias (London: Routledge, 2016). In process.

‘A Deviant Device: Diary Dissembling in Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace’, in The Female Figure in Contemporary Historical Fiction, ed. by Katherine Cooper and Emma Short (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)

‘Fatal Words and Dead Secrets: Rediscovering the Sensational Document’, in Neo-Victorian Gothic: Horror, Imagination, and Degeneration in the Re-imagined Nineteenth Century, ed. by Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012)

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

‘A Carefully Worded Postcard: Epistolary Economy in the Novels of Barbara Pym’, Women: A Cultural Review 25 (2014), 731-83

‘Diary as Queer Malady: Deflecting the Gaze in Sarah Waters’s Affinity’, Neo-Victorian Studies, 2 (2009/10), 65-85

‘Authenticity and Author[ity] in Contemporary American Fiction’, 21: Journal of Contemporary and Innovative Fiction, 1 (2008/09), 31-48

Book Review

Neo-Victorian Trauma: The Politics of Bearing Witness, ed. by Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben, Oscholars, 1 October 2012

HEA Publication

‘New Historicism and Christina Rossetti’s ‘Goblin Market’’, The Virtual Theorist, Birmingham City University in association with the Higher Education Academy. July 2013

Conference Papers

May 2017        ‘Subversive Letters: Waiting for the post (modern) in Muriel Spark’s early fiction’, British Women’s Writing between 1930 and 1960: ‘Influences and Connectivity’, University of Chichester

May 2015        ‘‘How it felt to turn the rippled pages’: Mapping Materiality in the Neo-Victorian fiction of Andrea Barrett’, Material Traces of the Past in Contemporary Literature, University of Malaga

July 2013         ‘‘A Carefully Worded Postcard’: Epistolary Economy in the Novels of Barbara Pym’, The Barbara Pym Centenary Conference, University of Central Lancashire

July 2013         ‘‘Treated carefully, wrapped in paper, secured with twine’: Materiality and Documents in Neo-Victorian Fiction’, Neo-Victorian Cultures: The Victorians Today, Liverpool John Moores University

April 2011       ‘Living Words: Epistolary Pleasures in A. S. Byatt’s Possession: A Romance’, Neo-Victorian Art and Aestheticism, Hull University

April 2010       ‘Through a Critical Looking Glass: Diary Disorder in Katie Roiphe’s Still She Haunts Me’, Fashioning the Neo-Victorian, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

July 2009         ‘Lewis Carroll and the Curious Theatre of Modern Monstrosity’, Monstrous Media/Spectral Subjects, Lancaster University

July 2009         ‘Diary Dissent in Mick Jackson’s The Underground Man’, English Research Forum, Edge Hill University

June 2009        ‘A Deviant Device: Diary Dissembling in Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace’ Echoes of the Past: Women, History and Memory in Fiction and Film, Newcastle University

June 2009        ‘A Dissident Diarist: The Superfluous Other in Mick Jackson’s The Underground Man’, The Other Nineteenth Century, Chester University

Sep 2008         ‘Open me carefully and tell it slant: Letters and the Victorian Body in A. S. Byatt’s Possession: A Romance’, Bodies and Things: Victorian Literature and the Matter of Culture, Oxford University

March 2008     ‘Epistolary Geometry in Sarah Waters’s Affinity’, Adapting the Nineteenth Century: Revisiting, Revising and Rewriting the Past, University of Wales Lampeter

March 2008     ‘Epistolary in Sarah Waters’s Affinity’, The Idea of the New: Discovery, Expression and Reception, University College London

May 2006        ‘Authenticity and Author[ity] in Contemporary American Fiction’, The Short Story Conference, Edge Hill University

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