Corpus Approaches to Lexicogrammar (LxGr)

LxGr: Focus and Format

Drawing Hands by M. C. Escher

LxGr is an annual symposium taking place in early/mid July.

For the programmes of past editions of the symposium, with links to abstracts and slides, see the LxGr Archive.

Until recently, the symposium was held onsite, but LxGr2021 was held online. As the online event attracted a much larger number of presentations and participants, this is very probably the format it will have in the future.

The focus of LxGr is the interaction of lexis and grammar. The focus is influenced by Halliday’s view of lexis and grammar as “complementary perspectives” (1991: 32), and his conception of the two as notional ends of a continuum (lexicogrammar), in that “if you interrogate the system grammatically you will get grammar-like answers and if you interrogate it lexically you get lexis-like answers” (1992: 64).

LxGr primarily welcomes papers reporting on corpus-based research on any aspect of the interaction of lexis and grammar, and is particularly interested in studies that interrogate the system lexicogrammatically to get lexicogrammatical answers. However, position papers discussing theoretical or methodological issues are also welcome, as long as they are relevant to both lexicogrammar and corpus linguistics. More specifically, studies can …

  • focus more on the lexis or grammar end of the continuum, or adopt an integrative approach.
  • discuss different interpretations of the nature of lexicogrammar.
  • operate within any theoretical approach that takes into account the interaction of lexis and grammar; e.g. Construction Grammar, Lexical Grammar, Pattern Grammar, Systemic Functional Grammar, Valency Grammar.
  • discuss empirical findings in need of theoretical interpretation.
  • adopt a synchronic or diachronic approach.
  • examine any language, or compare different languages.
  • examine L1 and/or L2 use.
  • discuss the implications of the findings of corpus-based lexicogrammatical research for applied linguistics (e.g. forensic linguistics, lexicography, language acquisition, language processing, language teaching, language testing and assessment, translation, sociolinguistics, discourse studies).
  • report on the development of relevant resources for research and/or applications (e.g. language teaching, translation).

Full papers are allocated a total of 35 minutes (including 10 minutes for discussion).
Work-in-progress reports are allocated a total of 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for discussion).

There are no parallel sessions.

Participation is free.

If you have any questions regarding the LxGr symposium, please contact the organiser, Costas Gabrielatos (gabrielc@edgehill.ac.uk).

LxGr Archive 2016-2021

LxGr2021

LxGr2021 was held online (synchronously) via Microsoft Teams on Friday & Saturday 2-3 July 2021.

LxGr2021 in numbers: 150 participants, 25 programme committee members, 20 presenters, 10 languages (not including Englishes), 3 moderators, 2 technical advisors.

LxGr2021 would like to acknowledge the support of …

Day 1: Friday 2 July 2021

9.30am – 10am     WELCOME

10am – 11am   PLENARY
Sebastian HOFFMANN (University of Trier)
Rhythm in World Englishes: A look at the interaction of phonology and lexico-grammar from a corpus-based perspective
[Abstract]

11am – 11.30am     BREAK / CHAT

11.30am – 12.05pm
Ling LIN (Shanghai Jiao Tong University) & Ming LIU (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
Part-of-speech patterns in research introductions: A cross-disciplinary study
[Abstract]

12.10pm – 12.45pm
Christina Sook Beng ONG  (Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman)
Nativised light verb constructions in Malaysian English
[Abstract]

12.45pm – 1.15pm     BREAK / CHAT

1.15pm – 1.50pm
Souhaila MESSAOUDI, Claire BRIERLEY & James DICKINS  (University of Leeds)
Investigating French interference in Algerian students’ English-Arabic / Arabic-English translations of collocations
[Abstract] [Slides]

1.55pm – 2.30pm
Alex CARR  (Cardiff University)
An exploration into the relationship between nominal form and temporal semantics
[Abstract]

2.30pm – 3pm     BREAK / CHAT

3pm – 3.35pm
Joyce LIM  (University of Cambridge)
Exploring the development of ‘verb 4-gram’ sequences and grammar patterns in L2 writing: A comparative study of L1 Korean speakers and L2 speakers of various L1
[Abstract] [Slides]

3.40pm – 4.15pm
Jim LAW  (Brigham Young University)
A lexicogrammatical approach to participant role alternations in the French spending frame
[Abstract] [Slides]

4.15pm – 4.45pm     BREAK / CHAT

4.45pm – 5.20pm
Lucy CHRISPIN  (Cardiff University)
A corpus investigation into lexical aspect as a lexicogrammatical feature of the intransitive construction
[Abstract]

5.25pm – 6pm
Milntra RAKSACHAT  (University of Oregon)
Serial verb ʔaw ‘take’ with instrumental meaning in Isaan: A distinct construction?
[Abstract]

Day 2: Saturday 3 July 2021

9am – 9.30am     WELCOME

9.30am – 10.05am
Susanne DeVORE  (University of Hawaii)
Usage-based indices of proficiency: Verb-vac and phrasal constructions in Mandarin
[Abstract]

10.10am – 10.45am
Chen-Yu Chester HSIEH  (National Taiwan University of Science and Technology)
Categorization for evaluation: a corpus-based study on the use of zhong ‘kind; type’ with constructions of evaluation in Mandarin conversation
[Abstract]

10.50am – 11.25am
Daniel JACH  (Southwest Jiaotong University)
The case of German two-way prepositions
[Abstract] [Slides]

11.25am – 11.55am     BREAK / CHAT

11.55am – 12.30pm
Viktoria ZHUKOVSKA  (Zhytomyr State Ivan Franko University)
English with/with-less-subjparti constructions: A case of a quantitative corpus-based analysis
[Abstract] [Slides]

12.35pm – 1.10pm
Piotr TWARDZISZ  (University of Warsaw)
A corpus-based study of affixation tendencies in related academic disciplines.
[Abstract]

1.10pm – 1.40pm     BREAK / CHAT

1.40pm – 2.15pm
Eva ZEHENTNER  (University of Zurich)
Alternations emerge and disappear: The network of dispossession constructions in the history of English
[Abstract]

2.20pm – 2.55pm
Carlos KAUFFMANN  (São Paulo Catholic University)
Multi-dimensional analysis of literary style from a lexicogrammatical perspective
[Abstract] [Slides]

2.55pm – 3.25pm     BREAK / CHAT

3.25pm – 4pm
Irene CHECA-GARCIA  (University of Wyoming)
What the correlation between syntactic complexity and lexical development measures can tell us about modes of acquisition
[Abstract]

4.05pm – 4.40pm
Lucia BUSSO  (Aston University)
The blended nature of legal-lay language in Italian and English: A corpus-based contrastive analysis
[Abstract]

4.40pm – 5.40pm     DISCUSSION & FEEDBACK

LxGr2021 Programme Committee

Bogdan Babych (Heidelberg University)
Federica Barbieri  (University of Swansea)
Tine Breban (University of Manchester)
Belen Diaz-Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Christopher Gledhill (Université Paris-Diderot)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Stefania Maci (University of Bergamo)
Geraldine Mark (University of Cambridge)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge (University of East Finland)
Magali Paquot (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
Serge Sharoff (University of Leeds)
Benet Vincent (Coventry University)
John Williams (University of Portsmouth)
Stefanie Wulff (University of Florida)

LxGr2020

LxGr2020 had to be cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

LxGr2020 Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (University of Swansea)
Belén Díez Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Christopher Gledhill (Université Paris-Diderot)
Glenn Hadikin (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Jennifer Hughes (Lancaster University)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Stefania Maci (University of Bergamo)
Geraldine Mark (University of Cambridge)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge (University of East Finland)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
Benet Vincent (Coventry University)
John Williams (University of Portsmouth)
Stefanie Wulff (University of Florida)

LxGr2019


Saturday 22 June 2019

Edge Hill University

Venue: H242

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00  REGISTRATION & COFFEE

10:00 – 11:00  Invited Talk
Pascual PEREZ-PAREDES  (University of Cambridge, UK)
Uses of ‘actually’ in spoken learner corpora
[Abstract]  [Slides]

11:00 – 11:30  COFFEE

11:30 – 12:05
Věra SLÁDKOVÁ  (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)
Grammatical collocations in English essays written by Czech secondary school students
[Abstract]  [Slides]

12:10 – 12:45
Pauline KRIELKE  (Saarland University, Germany)
Paradigmatic change and redistribution of functional load: 
The case of relative clauses in scientific English
[Abstract]

12:50 – 13:25
Stefania M. MACI (University Of Bergamo, Italy)
“I’m very interested in the possibility of ketone metabolism playing a role in the metabolic benefits of fibres.” Ketogenic diet on Twitter: A pilot study
[Slides]

13:25 – 14:25  LUNCH

14:25 – 15:00
Piotr TWARDZISZ  (University of Warsaw, Poland)
Different syntactic contexts of two types of abstract nominalizations in English
[Abstract]  [Slides]

15:05 – 15:40
Lucy CHRISPIN (Cardiff University, UK)
An investigation into the lexico-grammatical features of the behavioural process
[Abstract]  [Slides]

15:45 – 16:15  COFFEE

16:15 – 17:15  Invited Talk
Jennifer HUGHES & Andrew HARDIE  (Lancaster University, UK)
Lexicogrammar and the brain, in theory and in practice
[Abstract]

17:15 – 18:00  DISCUSSION & FEEDBACK

LxGr2019 Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (University of Swansea) 
Belén Díez Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton) 
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Christopher Gledhill (Université Paris-Diderot)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Jennifer Hughes (Lancaster University)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Geraldine Mark (University of Cambridge)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge (University of East Finland)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson (Lancaster University) 
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
Szilvia Szita (Leiden University)
James Thomas  (Masaryk University)
Benet Vincent (Coventry University)
John Williams (University of Portsmouth)
Stefanie Wulff (University of Florida)

LxGr2018

 

Saturday 16 June 2018

Edge Hill University

Venue: Hub 2, Main Building (map)

 

PROGRAMME

9:45 – 10:15     REGISTRATION & COFFEE/TEA

10:15 – 10:50
Hala ALSHAHRANI,  Claire BRIERLEY & James DICKINS 
(University of Leeds)
The functional lexico-grammar of semantic prosody in the Quran 
[Abstract] [Slides]

10:55 – 11:30
Lihong HUANG
(Georgetown University)
Lexicogrammar in Mandarin Chinese: The case of guo and le
[Abstract]

11:35 – 12:10
Roberta PITTALUGA
(Saint Petersburg State University)
Russian verbs of motion: Valency Grammar as an instrument to explain and teach the meaning of prefixes
[Abstract] [Slides]

12:15 – 12:50
Bogdan BABYCH 
(University of Leeds)
Unsupervised discovery of Construction Grammar representations from unannotated corpus for under-resourced languages
[Abstract] [Slides]

12:50 – 13:50     LUNCH

13:50 – 14:25
Zeping HUANG 
(Hong Kong Baptist University)
Lexical Bundles in Conversation across English varieties: A Core-Periphery approach
[Abstract] [Slides]

14:30 – 15:05
Patrick HANKS & Sara MOŽE 
(University of Wolverhampton)
Verb patterns, noun collocations, and grammatical metaphors
[Abstract] [Slides]

15:05 – 15:30  COFFEE/TEA

15:30 – 16:05
Benet VINCENT
(Coventry University)
The expression of obligation in student academic writing
[Abstract] [Slides]

16:10 – 16:45
James STRATTON
(Purdue University)
A corpus-based analysis of the adjective intensifiers well and proper in British English using the BNC1994 and the spoken BNC2014
[Abstract] [Slides]

16:50 – 17:25
Jennifer HUGHES
(Lancaster University)
Neural evidence for a single lexicogrammatical processing system
[Abstract] [Slides]

17:25 – 18:00     DISCUSSION

LxGr2018 Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (University of Swansea)
Tine Breban  (University of Manchester)
Belén Díez-Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Geraldine Mark (University of Cambridge)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge (University of East Finland)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
James Thomas  (Masaryk University)
Benet Vincent (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff (University of Florida)

LxGr2017

Saturday 10 June 2017 

Edge Hill University 

Room: H242 (map)

Faculty of Health and Social Care

PROGRAMME

10:00 – 10:30     REGISTRATION & COFFEE

10:30 – 11:00
Jennifer HUGHES  (Lancaster University)
Using the ERP technique to investigate the processing of corpus-derived collocations in native and non-native speakers of English

11:05 – 11:35
Peter MACHONIS  (Florida International University)
A Corpus-based analysis of the works of Dickens and Melville: Are phrasal verbs typically American?

11:40 – 12:10
Piotr PĘZIK  (University of Łódź)
Lexis and grammar-driven approaches to phraseology extraction

12:15 – 12:45
Anthony GRANT  (Edge Hill University)
Tenacious parallel protocorpora and resulting lexicogrammatical resources

13:00 – 14:00     LUNCH

14:05 – 14:35
Gordon TUCKER  (Cardiff University)
Modelling corpus evidenced lexical phenomena in a systemic functional grammar: A response to Sinclair and Hoey

14:40 – 15:10
Ngum Meyuhnsi NJENDE (University of Leuven), Kristin DAVIDSE (University of Leuven) & Lobke GHESQUIÈR (University of Mons)
Specificational it– and there-clefts with quantified NPs as value

15:15 – 15:45
Oliver WICHER  (University of Paderborn)
The Lexical Grammar of French past tenses:  Corpus evidence and implications for pedagogical Construction Grammar

15:50 – 16:20
Nicholas GROOM  (University of Birmingham)
Locating semantic sequences in theory and practice

16:25 – 16:55
Antonella LUPORINI  (University of Bologna)
What the corpus can(not) tell us about metaphor: A corpus-assisted analysis of crisis-related lexical/grammatical metaphors in the 2008 financial press

17:00 – 17:30
Sophie-Hélène CIMON & Christopher GLEDHILL (Université Paris-Diderot)
Lexicogrammatical patterns as the building blocks of text: Identifying and interpreting LG patterns in two comparable corpora of financial press releases

LxGr2017 Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (Swansea University)
Tine Breban  (University of Manchester)
Kristin Davidse  (University of Leuven)
María Belén Díez-Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin    (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge  (University of East Finland)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson  (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
James Thomas  (Masaryk University)
María Sánchez-Tornel (University of Murcia)
Benet Vincent  (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff  (University of Florida)

LxGr2016

Saturday 2 April 2016

Edge Hill University

Room B106

Business School, first floor

PROGRAMME

10:00 – 11:00
REGISTRATION & COFFEE

11:00 – 11:40
Luluh Aldhubayi, Eric Atwell & Brandon Bennett (University of Leeds)
Using a corpus-based tool in lexical-semantic relation extraction to extend the Arabic WordNet

11:40 – 12:20
Areej Alshutayri & Eric Atwell (University of Leeds)
Using Twitter to collect an Arabic Dialects Corpus

12:20 – 13:00
Lu Lu (SOAS)
Argument identifiability and its syntactic realisations in Mandarin Chinese light verb constructions

13:00 – 14:00    LUNCH

14:00 – 14:40
Tine Breban (University of Manchester) & Kristin Davidse  (University of Leuven)
Rethinking the function of adjectives such as formerproperpossible in the English noun phrase

14:40 – 15:20
Jill Bowie & Sean Wallis (University College London)
A lexical profile of grammatical decline: The to-infinitival perfect

15:20 – 16:00
James Thomas (Masaryk University)
Word templates: Sources and exploitation

16:00 – 16:40
Eva M. Duran Eppler (University of Roehampton)
Dependency distance and bilingual language use: Evidence from German/English and Chinese/English data

16:40 – 17:30
DISCUSSION

LxGr2016 Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (Swansea University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann   (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe  (Birmingham City University)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson  (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
María Sánchez-Tornel  (University of Murcia)
Nick Smith  (University of Leicester)
Eivind Torgersen  (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Benet Vincent  (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff  (University of Florida)

 

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