Corpus Approaches to Lexicogrammar (LxGr)

LxGr2018

Saturday 16 June 2018, Edge Hill University

Venue: Hub 2, Main Building (map)

If you would like to attend LxGr2018, please contact Costas Gabrielatos (gabrielc@edgehill.ac.uk).

There is no registration fee, as LxGr2018 is funded by the Department of English, History & Creative Writing, Edge Hill University. Also, coffee/tea and a light buffet lunch will be provided, but participants are expected to cover their travel and accommodation costs. Please note that the number of places is limited, and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

PROGRAMME

9:45 – 10:15     REGISTRATION & COFFEE/TEA

10:15 – 10:50
Hala ALSHAHRANI,  Claire BRIERLEY & James DICKINS 
(University of Leeds)
The functional lexico-grammar of semantic prosody in the Quran

10:55 – 11:30
Lihong HUANG
(Georgetown University)
Lexicogrammar in Mandarin Chinese: The case of guo and le

11:35 – 12:10
Roberta PITTALUGA
(Saint Petersburg State University)
Russian verbs of motion: Valency Grammar as an instrument to explain and teach the meaning of prefixes

12:15 – 12:50
Bogdan BABYCH 
(University of Leeds)
Unsupervised discovery of Construction Grammar representations from unannotated corpus for under-resourced languages

12:50 – 13:50     LUNCH

13:50 – 14:25
Zeping HUANG
(Hong Kong Baptist University)
Lexical Bundles in Conversation across English varieties: A Core-Periphery approach

14:30 – 15:05
Patrick HANKS & Sara MOŽE 
(University of Wolverhampton)
Verb patterns, noun collocations, and grammatical metaphors

15:05 – 15:30  COFFEE/TEA

15:30 – 16:05
Benet VINCENT
(Coventry University)
The expression of obligation in student academic writing

16:10 – 16:45
James STRATTON
(Purdue University)
A corpus-based analysis of the adjective intensifiers well and proper in British English using the BNC1994 and the spoken BNC2014

16:50 – 17:25
Jennifer HUGHES
(Lancaster University)
Neural evidence for a single lexicogrammatical processing system

17:25 – 18:00     DISCUSSION

Focus & Scope

The focus of LxGr is the interaction of lexis and grammar. The focus is influenced by Halliday’s view of lexis and grammar as “complementary perspectives” (1991: 32), and his conception of the two as notional ends of a continuum (lexicogrammar), in that “if you interrogate the system grammatically you will get grammar-like answers and if you interrogate it lexically you get lexis-like answers” (1992: 64).

LxGr primarily welcomes papers reporting on corpus-based research on any aspect of the interaction of lexis and grammar. However, position papers discussing theoretical or methodological issues are also welcome, as long as they are relevant to both lexicogrammar and corpus linguistics. LxGr is particularly interested in studies that interrogate the system lexicogrammatically to get lexicogrammatical answers. More specifically, studies may …

  • focus more on the lexis or grammar end of the continuum, or adopt an integrative approach.
  • discuss different interpretations of the nature of lexicogrammar.
  • operate within any theoretical approach that takes into account the interaction of lexis and grammar; e.g. Construction Grammar, Lexical Grammar, Pattern Grammar, Systemic Functional Grammar, Valency Grammar.
  • discuss empirical findings in need of theoretical interpretation.
  • adopt a synchronic or diachronic approach.
  • examine any language, or compare different languages.
  • examine L1 and/or L2 use.
  • discuss the implications of the findings of corpus-based lexicogrammatical research for applied linguistics (e.g. forensic linguistics, lexicography, language acquisition, language teaching, translation, sociolinguistics, discourse studies).
  • report on the development of relevant resources for research and/or applications (e.g. language teaching, translation).

Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (University of Swansea)
Tine Breban  (University of Manchester)
Belen Diaz-Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Geraldine Mark (University of Cambridge)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge (University of East Finland)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
James Thomas  (Masaryk University)
Benet Vincent (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff (University of Florida)

Travel & Accommodation

Travel

Please note that Edge Hill University is located in Ormskirk.

St Helens Road, Ormskirk, Lancashire, L39 4QP

For maps, and details on road and rail routes, please see here: https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/location

If you have any queries, please email Costas Gabrielatos: gabrielc@edgehill.ac.uk

Accommodation

Ormskirk (where Edge Hill University is located) doesn’t have any hotels within short walking distance from the university or the bus station. Please see below for hotels that are a short drive or train journey from Ormskirk.

If you are coming by train

The most straightforward option is to stay in Liverpool at a hotel near Liverpool Central or Moorfields train stations, and take the train to Ormskirk. There are quite a few hotels very near these stations (up to 10 minutes’ walk), and trains to Ormskirk run every 15 minutes. The train journey is 30 minutes from Moorfields and 35 minutes from Liverpool Central. Once in Ormskirk, you can take the EL1 bus to Edge Hill University (the bus station is about 5 minutes’ walk from the train station). The EL1 bus comes every 20 minutes, and takes about 5 minutes to the university. Overall travel time from Liverpool to Edge Hill University is about 45-60 minutes (depending on the hotel and train station).

Hotel near Moorfields train station:

Hotels near Liverpool Central train station:

Alternatively (particularly if you’re coming from the North of England), you could stay at Preston (preferably near the train station) and take the train to Ormskirk. The train journey from Preston to Ormskirk is 30-35 minutes.

However, please note that the Preston-Ormskirk connection is infrequent: trains run every 90 minutes or so. Once in Ormskirk, you can take the EL1 bus to Edge Hill University (the bus station is about 5 minutes’ walk from the train station). The EL1 bus comes every 20 minutes, and takes about 5 minutes to the university. Overall travel time from Preston to Edge Hill University is about 50 minutes.

Hotels within short walking distance from Preston train station:

 If you are coming by car

There are a few hotels within short driving distance from Edge Hill University:

  • Innkeeper’s Lodge Ormskirk, Springfield Road, Aughton, Ormskirk L39 6ST (10 minutes’ drive to Edge Hill University).
  • Premier Inn, 544 Southport Road, Scarisbrick, Ormskirk L40 9RG    (15 minutes’ drive to Edge Hill University).
  •  Premier Inn Liverpool NorthNorthern Perimeter Road, Netherton, Merseyside L30 7PT (20 minutes’ drive to Edge Hill University).

 

If you have any queries, please email Costas Gabrielatos: gabrielc@edgehill.ac.uk

 

LxGr2017

Saturday 10 June 2017 

Edge Hill University 

Room: H242

Faculty of Health and Social Care 

(Building #4 on the campus map: LxGr2017.Map)

PROGRAMME

10:00 – 10:30     REGISTRATION & COFFEE

10:30 – 11:00
Jennifer HUGHES  (Lancaster University)
Using the ERP technique to investigate the processing of corpus-derived collocations in native and non-native speakers of English

11:05 – 11:35
Peter MACHONIS  (Florida International University)
A Corpus-based analysis of the works of Dickens and Melville: Are phrasal verbs typically American?

11:40 – 12:10
Piotr PĘZIK  (University of Łódź)
Lexis and grammar-driven approaches to phraseology extraction

12:15 – 12:45
Anthony GRANT  (Edge Hill University)
Tenacious parallel protocorpora and resulting lexicogrammatical resources

13:00 – 14:00     LUNCH

14:05 – 14:35
Gordon TUCKER  (Cardiff University)
Modelling corpus evidenced lexical phenomena in a systemic functional grammar: A response to Sinclair and Hoey

14:40 – 15:10
Ngum Meyuhnsi NJENDE (University of Leuven), Kristin DAVIDSE (University of Leuven) & Lobke GHESQUIÈR (University of Mons)
Specificational it– and there-clefts with quantified NPs as value

15:15 – 15:45
Oliver WICHER  (University of Paderborn)
The Lexical Grammar of French past tenses:  Corpus evidence and implications for pedagogical Construction Grammar

15:50 – 16:20
Nicholas GROOM  (University of Birmingham)
Locating semantic sequences in theory and practice

16:25 – 16:55
Antonella LUPORINI  (University of Bologna)
What the corpus can(not) tell us about metaphor: A corpus-assisted analysis of crisis-related lexical/grammatical metaphors in the 2008 financial press

17:00 – 17:30
Sophie-Hélène CIMON & Christopher GLEDHILL (Université Paris-Diderot)
Lexicogrammatical patterns as the building blocks of text: Identifying and interpreting LG patterns in two comparable corpora of financial press releases

Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (Swansea University)
Tine Breban  (University of Manchester)
Kristin Davidse  (University of Leuven)
María Belén Díez-Bedmar (University of Jaén)
Eva Duran Eppler  (University of Roehampton)
Lise Fontaine  (Cardiff University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Glenn Hadikin    (University of Portsmouth)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann  (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe (Birmingham City University)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Michael Pace-Sigge  (University of East Finland)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson  (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
James Thomas  (Masaryk University)
María Sánchez-Tornel (University of Murcia)
Benet Vincent  (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff  (University of Florida)

LxGr2016

Saturday 2 April 2016

Edge Hill University

Room B106

Business School, first floor

(building #9 on this map)

Programme

10:00 – 11:00
Registration & Coffee

11:00 – 11:40
Luluh Aldhubayi, Eric Atwell & Brandon Bennett (University of Leeds)
Using a corpus-based tool in lexical-semantic relation extraction to extend the Arabic WordNet

11:40 – 12:20
Areej Alshutayri & Eric Atwell (University of Leeds)
Using Twitter to collect an Arabic Dialects Corpus

12:20 – 13:00
Lu Lu (SOAS)
Argument identifiability and its syntactic realisations in Mandarin Chinese light verb constructions

13:00 – 14:00    LUNCH

14:00 – 14:40
Tine Breban (University of Manchester) & Kristin Davidse  (University of Leuven)
Rethinking the function of adjectives such as formerproperpossible in the English noun phrase

14:40 – 15:20
Jill Bowie & Sean Wallis (University College London)
A lexical profile of grammatical decline: The to-infinitival perfect

15:20 – 16:00
James Thomas (Masaryk University)
Word templates: Sources and exploitation

16:00 – 16:40
Eva M. Duran Eppler (University of Roehampton)
Dependency distance and bilingual language use: Evidence from German/English and Chinese/English data

16:40 – 17:30    DISCUSSION

Programme Committee

Federica Barbieri  (Swansea University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Nick Groom  (University of Birmingham)
Andrew Hardie  (Lancaster University)
Sebastian Hoffmann   (University of Trier)
Andrew Kehoe  (Birmingham City University)
Gabriel Ozon  (University of Sheffield)
Magali Paquot  (Université catholique de Louvain)
Pascual Perez-Paredes  (University of Cambridge)
Paul Rayson  (Lancaster University)
Ute Römer  (Georgia State University)
María Sánchez-Tornel  (University of Murcia)
Nick Smith  (University of Leicester)
Eivind Torgersen  (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Benet Vincent  (Coventry University)
Stefanie Wulff  (University of Florida)

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