BA (Hons) Creative Writing and Film Studies

  • Study Abroad Option Available
  • Sandwich Year Option Available
  • International Students Can Apply

Overview

UCAS Code:WW69
Course Length:3 Years Full-Time
Start Dates:September 2017
Department:Department of English, History & Creative Writing
Location:Edge Hill University
  • Creative Writing at Edge Hill University ranked in the top two in the North West for organisation & management in the National Student Survey 2015;
  • Media at Edge Hill University ranked in the top two in the North West for personal development in the National Student Survey 2015;
  • Gain insights into the publishing, broadcasting and professional production of creative writing and explore the glamorous, seductive and global appeal of film and cinema.

Presenting representations of fictional and nonfictional worlds, revealing gripping stories of right and wrong, and asking questions about what society expects of men and women could describe both an exploration of the boundaries of your own creativity through reading and writing or engaging in the study of the spectacular illusions, extravagant lies and glimpses of shadowy truths that have emerged from the world of film and cinema. Studying both creative writing and film studies on this degree will encourage you as an aspiring writer and bring you a new appreciation of literature as you live the writing life. It will also immerse you in the culture, history and development of one of the most powerfully influential media forms to emerge in the twentieth century, enhancing your understanding of film from basic approaches to highly sophisticated interpretative and analytical strategies.

Student Profiles

  • Harriet Hirshman

    BA (Hons) Creative Writing and Film Studies
    When I saw the opportunity to become a student blogger I thought it would be good for me and provide some practical experience of what I want to do."
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Department of English, History & Creative Writing

Course in Depth

What will I study?

Year 1 includes an introduction to the art of writing fiction and poetry, giving you the skills you will need to start composing short observational poems and a short story. You will learn the basics of writing scripts for radio, discover the art of reading as a writer, and develop the skills and language required to examine, interpret and analyse films. There is also the option to investigate the history of cinema, focusing on either European or world films.

In Year 2 you will start to write groups of poems and further your understanding of the art of reading as a poet, in addition to exploring the art of scriptwriting for the stage and the techniques of short fiction. Developing and broadening your understanding of film by examining the nature of film genres, you will have the opportunity to engage in a detailed case study, in addition to exploring the thorny issues surrounding screen censorship.

Year 3 presents opportunities to experiment in a range of poetic styles and concentrate on a longer work of your own. You will continue your study of prose through working on more complex stories or chapters of a novel, as well as turning your attention to writing scripts for film and television. An in-depth analysis of film adaptations will enable you to explore how a range of texts are translated into film, while optional modules immerse you in either contemporary European cinema or American independent cinema.

How will I study?

Class teaching and learning for Creative Writing modules is centred on the writer’s workshop, where there is a strong emphasis on participation and the creative community.

You will learn the habits of a professional writer, including keeping a writer’s journal, research and observation, re-drafting and editing and presenting work to a high standard. Self and peer appraisal are important, as are paired and small group work. All modules are underpinned by a sense of an audience – ranging from a student’s seminar group through electronic and paper publication to performance.

For Film Studies modules, a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, presentations and group work are supplemented by a dynamic programme of screenings, and annual trips to film festivals. As well as multiple film screenings that form part of your studies, you also have access to the Short Cuts Cinema at our Studio Theatre, which screens seasons of great films on a big screen.

How will I be assessed?

Creative Writing modules are assessed by coursework, which includes creative practice, critical practice, essays and reflection on the whole process.

Assessment for Film Studies modules ranges from traditional essays to critical reviews, practical readings of film extracts under exam conditions, and oral presentations.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by an enthusiastic team of lecturers, tutors and professional writers whose work has been widely published, broadcast and staged.

The programme team publish and/or edit a variety of academic and literary journals, including the Journal of British and Irish Innovative PoetryShort Fiction in Theory and Practice and 21: Journal of Contemporary and Innovative Fiction.

A Great Study Environment

BA (Hons) Creative Writing and Film StudiesAs a Creative Writing student at Edge Hill University, you will have the opportunity to attend workshops and readings with a variety of guest writers at the Arts Centre. Close links have also been established with Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre as well as other poetry venues across Merseyside.

The University hosts the annual Edge Hill Short Story Prize and runs a number of research groups, as well as events, and has recently set up the Edge Hill University Press, which offers students the opportunity of internships working on the editorial team.

Film Studies modules are devised and taught by the Department of Media which is based in Creative Edge, a state-of-the-art £17m building offering highly contemporary suites of outstanding facilities for creative media students.

Key features include TV studios with broadcast capacity and full production capabilities, recording studios, sound-editing suites, animation studios, photographic studio, radio studio and multimedia laboratory. Our innovative resources are designed to ensure you gain practical experience to a professional standard. Dedicated support in the use of all creative media facilities is available through our Media Development Team.

Modules

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Year 1

FLM1011 How to Read a Film: Sound and Image (20 credits)

How to Read a Film: Sound and Image gives you the language and skills needed to examine, interpret and write about films, examining a different film in depth each week. It is full of truly valuable activities, advice and guidance in becoming an efficient reader of film.

FLM1014 How to Read a Film: Approaches (20 credits)

How to Read a Film: Approaches takes you a step further into critical, analytical and theoretical spheres, examining films in close detail and discovering some of the many significant academic and critical approaches to the cinema. You will be introduced to several important critical concepts such as structuralism, post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism and postmodernism.

WRI1018 Introduction to Poetry (20 credits)

Introduction to Poetry guides you in the art of non-metrical poetry by concentrating upon shorter poems and upon building up techniques of perception, language and effect. This will be done in combination with the reading of poetry with the aim of integrating reading as a poet into an on-going practice of reflection. Emphasis will be placed upon journal writing and workshop practice.

WRI1019 Introduction to Fiction (20 credits)

Introduction to Fiction outlines the art of fiction by concentrating on shorter pieces, often referred to as ‘microfiction’. The module also builds up techniques of perception, language and effect, in combination with the reading of fiction, with the aim of integrating reading as a fiction writer into an on-going practice of reflection. Emphasis will be placed upon journal writing and workshop practice.

WRI1020 Introduction to Scriptwriting (20 credits)

Introduction to Scriptwriting covers some of the essential elements of dramatic scriptwriting. These include characterisation, writing dialogue, scenes and beats, monologues, conflict and structure. The module will explore the concept of story in different mediums (theatre/film/television/radio) but will focus in particular on radio drama. You will gain an understanding of the specific demands of learning how to write effectively for radio.

You will select one of the following modules:

FLM1013 World Cinemas: Europe (20 credits)

World Cinemas: Europe enables you to recognise the impact of a range of significant national cinemas and directors from across the history of cinema within their particular, unique contexts. This module will concentrate on Europe.

FLM1016 World Cinemas: Beyond Europe (20 credits)

World Cinemas: Beyond Europe concentrates on cinema outside Europe. Not only will your knowledge of international cinemas be dramatically broadened, but you will also discover the incredible breadth of styles, narratives and motivations in the making of world film.

Language modules in French, Spanish or Mandarin, delivered at the Edge Hill Language Centre, are available to study as an integral part of this degree. A single Language module can be studied instead of either FLM1013 World Cinemas: Europe, FLM1016 World Cinemas: Beyond Europe, or WRI1020 Introduction to Scriptwriting.

Year 2

FLM2030 Film Genre (20 credits)

Film Genre critically examines the functions and forms of film genres in their socio-historical contexts. The module also introduces you to genre theory and additional approaches relevant to genre analysis.

FLM2033 Film Genre Case Study (20 credits)

Film Genre Case Study enables you to critically engage in a detailed and specifically theorised study of a key American film genre. It is likely that you will be offered one Hollywood genre from a range of possibilities including, perhaps, the musical, the horror film, or science fiction cinema. Although the precise case study for the module may change with staffing and with staff interests, the objectives will remain consistent.

FLM2035 Censorship and the Cinema (20 credits)

Censorship and the Cinema enables you to learn about and debate the power relationships between industry, audience and censor during such happenings as the imposition of the Production Code in Hollywood during the 1930s and the Video Nasty scare in Britain in the 1980s.

WRI2023 The Art of Poetry (20 credits)

The Art of Poetry enables you to write in, and experiment with, a variety of styles, to read a range of contemporary and recent poetry, and to relate that reading to an on-going process of reflection that will feedback into a robust and inventive writing practice. Emphasis will be placed upon continuous journaling, intensive reading and workshop participation.

WRI2024 Writing Short Stories (20 credits)

Writing Short Stories explores the nature of the short story form and its specific demands on the writer. You will produce your own short fiction, responding to the diversity of styles and genres adopted by short story authors. You will also be given guidance on potential outlets for your work.

WRI2025 The Art of Scriptwriting (20 credits)

The Art of Scriptwriting explores various strategies towards scriptwriting with a particular emphasis on writing imaginatively for the stage. You will gain an understanding of the central role of the playwright in the theatre making process, be involved in a dramaturgical analysis of a range of scripts, and gain an understanding of how plays are constructed. The module enables you to experience writing collaboratively as well as developing your own personal practice and playwright’s aesthetic. Additionally, you will prepare, pitch, develop and write to format your own original one act play.

If you studied a Language module in Year 1, you may wish to study a further Language module in Year 2. This would form an integral part of your degree in place of FLM2035 Censorship and the Cinema.

Year 3

FLM3021 Text to Screen 1 (20 credits)

Text to Screen 1 reflects on how a large proportion of films are the results of adaptations of a novel, a short story, a graphic novel, and so forth. The module examines a range of examples, looking at the influences, restrictions and motivations in the adaptation of stories to the screen.

FLM3025 Text to Screen 2 (20 credits)

Text to Screen 2 introduces you to the phenomenon of film adaptation and to the critical discourses necessary for understanding that phenomenon. The module familiarises you with a variety of narrative forms (including the novel, the short story, sequential art and the interactive text) and how these are adapted for the cinema. You will also consider external factors that may influence the adaptation process, including the presence of auteur directors, the franchise and genre considerations.

WRI3021 Poetry and Innovative Form (20 credits)

Poetry and Innovative Form enables you to practice advanced techniques and develop innovative strategies for writing poetry, while reading a range of contemporary works (including emergent forms) and reflecting upon the reading and writing. You will feed the resultant poetics of this writing back into a developed poetic practice. Emphasis will be placed upon autonomous and continuous writing practice and experimentation and the development of a poetics of writing to accompany and fortify this, as well as reading poetry as a fellow-practitioner and developing this work and awareness through workshop participation.

WRI3022 Advanced Fiction (20 credits)

Advanced Fiction provides you with the opportunity to write fiction at an advanced level, with a particular focus on the novel and the short story sequence. Using increasingly complex themes and techniques, you will establish a growing sense of autonomy as a writer, shaped by the reading of fiction and also your own continuous writing practice. You are also encouraged to experiment with form and genre and to consider potential publishing outlets for your work.

WRI3023 The Art of Screenwriting (20 credits)

The Art of Screenwriting focuses on the art of screenwriting for television and film. The module will give you an understanding of character, plot, dialogue, montage and the structure of screenwriting. The module will explore the particular skills required for writing
visually for the screen and the television medium. You will also learn to analyse films and consider a sequence analysis of scripts from the writer’s perspective. Some consideration on getting films produced and the industrial context of film making. The module will culminate in the preparing of outlines, the pitching of film ideas, treatments and writing to format your own industry standard film/television script (between 30-45 minutes long with appropriate additional documentation such as scene-by-scene and episode breakdowns).

You will select one of the following modules:

MED3234 American Independent Cinema (20 credits)

American Independent Cinema focuses on the industrial and economic dimensions of independent film production, distribution and exhibition. The module covers the development and changes in the American independent film sector from the late 1970s, looking at the growth of indie cinema and later Indiewood. In looking at the various dimensions of independent finance, production, distribution and exhibition, the module critically explores the very definitions of independence and the ways in which it has been conceptualised in relation to film.

MED3235 Contemporary European Cinema (20 credits)

Contemporary European Cinema explores the landscape of 21st century cinema in Europe by examining the films produced across the continent. Initially, the module will pose the question of what European cinema might be. You will then explore the national cinema paradigm in Europe, authorship in Europe, and major pan-European themes and aesthetics. By means of close textual analysis, the module will explore the similarities and contrasts that emerge between the nations and across the continent as a whole, and conclude with consideration of whether we can say with any certainty that a ‘European’ cinema exists.

If you studied Language modules in Years 1 and 2, you may wish to study a further Language module in Year 3. This would form an integral part of your degree in place of WRI3023 The Art of Screenwriting.

Optional modules provide an element of choice within the programme curriculum. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by timetabling requirements.

Disclaimer

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of our published course information, however our programmes are subject to ongoing review and development. Changing circumstances may necessitate alteration to, or the cancellation of, courses.

Changes may be necessary to comply with the requirements of accrediting bodies, revisions to subject benchmarks statements, to keep courses updated and contemporary, or as a result of student feedback. We reserve the right to make variations if we consider such action to be necessary or in the best interests of students.

Entry Criteria

Entry Requirements

120 UCAS Tariff points on the new UCAS Tariff. No specific subjects are required.

Example Offers

Some typical examples of how you can achieve 120 UCAS Tariff points are detailed below.

  • A Levels – BBB;
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (or combination of BTEC QCF qualifications) – Distinction, Distinction, Merit (DDM);
  • Access to Higher Education Diploma – successful completion of Diploma to include 45 credits at Level 3, of which 30 credits must be graded Distinction and 15 credits graded Merit.

Please note, the above examples may differ from actual offers made. A combination of A Level and BTEC awards may also be accepted.

As long as you have a minimum of two A Levels (or equivalent), there is no maximum number of qualifications that we will accept UCAS points from. This includes additional qualifications such as the Welsh Baccalaureate and Certificate of Personal Effectiveness (CoPE), AS Levels that haven’t been continued to A Level, and General Studies AS or A Level awards.

For further information on how you can meet the entry requirements, including details of alternative qualifications, please visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/offers.

EU students can get country-specific information about the University’s entry requirements and equivalent national qualifications at www.edgehill.ac.uk/eu.

International students should visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/international for information on the entry criteria for overseas applicants.

Recognition of Prior Learning

Edge Hill University recognises learning gained elsewhere, whether through academic credit and qualifications acquired from other relevant courses of study or through recognition of an individual’s professional and employment experience (also referred to as ‘experiential learning’).

Previous learning that is recognised in this way may be used towards meeting the entry requirements for a programme and/or for exemption from part of a programme. It is your responsibility to make a claim for recognition of prior learning. For guidance, please consult the University’s Recognition of Prior Learning Policy and contact the faculty in which you are interested in studying.

Career Prospects

What are my career prospects?

Typical careers for Creative Writing graduates include working in media, education, advertising, publishing, information technology, radio or television, business, and the theatre. Alternatively, you may wish to progress to further study or research in Creative Writing.

Typical careers for Film Studies graduates include teaching (further training required), media industries, film and television industry, IT, journalism, project management, specialised film schools, advertising and marketing. Alternatively, you may wish to progress to further study or research in Film Studies.

How can I enhance my employability?

It is useful to consider, even before you apply, how you will spend your time while studying and make the most of your university experience.

Optional, additional activities may be available on this degree which could help to prepare you for a stimulating and rewarding career. These include:

  • Sandwich Year – you may have the opportunity to apply to complete a sandwich year placement as part of your programme (usually the third year of a four year degree) and gain highly relevant work experience;
  • Study Abroad – you may have the opportunity to apply to spend an additional year (usually the third year of a four year degree) studying or working abroad;
  • Language Learning – you may be able to select language modules in French, Spanish or Mandarin, delivered at the Edge Hill Language Centre, as additional study.

Please note, the availability of these additional activities cannot be guaranteed for all students. Depending on availability and the number of students wanting to participate, there may be a competitive application process for sandwich year placements or study abroad opportunities or you may be required to secure a relevant placement yourself.

Finance

Tuition Fees

If you are a prospective UK or EU student who will be joining this undergraduate degree in academic year 2017/18, we expect tuition fees to increase to £9,250 per annum but this is currently subject to Government approval. You are advised to check this page regularly and once the position has been confirmed we will update this information. Tuition fees for international students enrolling on the programme in academic year 2017/18 are £11,575 per annum.

Financial Support

Subject to eligibility, UK and EU students can apply for a Tuition Fee Loan from the Government to cover the full cost of tuition fees. UK students may also be eligible to apply for additional funding to help with living costs.

For comprehensive information about the financial support available to eligible UK and EU students joining this programme in academic year 2017/18, together with details of how to apply for funding, please view our Money Matters 2017/18 guide at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradfinance2017.

Financial support information for international students can be found at www.edgehill.ac.uk/international/fees.

Scholarships

ScholarshipsEdge Hill University offers a range of scholarships with a competitive application process for prospective full-time undergraduate students. These scholarships aren’t linked to academic success and celebrate determination, talent and achievement beyond your coursework, for instance in creativity, enterprise, ICT, performance, sport or volunteering.

Additional scholarships, which you may qualify to receive, reward outstanding grades and are available to eligible UK and EU students.

To find out more about scholarships, to assess your eligibility, and to meet some of our dedicated scholarship winners, visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/scholarships.

Apply

How to Apply

Apply online through UCAS at www.ucas.com.

Visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/applyucas to find out more about the application process.

Should you accept an offer of a place to study with us and formally enrol as a student, you will be subject to the provisions of the regulations, rules, codes, conditions and policies which apply to our students. These are available at www.edgehill.ac.uk/studentterms.

Visit Us

If you are considering applying to study at Edge Hill University, the best way to gain an insight into student life is to discover our stunning campus for yourself by attending an open day. You can view dates and book your place at www.edgehill.ac.uk/bookanopenday.

Alternatively, if you are unable to attend an open day, you can find out more about all of our events for prospective undergraduate students, including monthly campus tours, at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradevents.

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to explore our full range of degrees before you apply, you can order an undergraduate prospectus at www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergradprospectus.

Get in Touch

If you have any questions about this programme or what it’s like to study at Edge Hill University, please contact:

International students should visit www.edgehill.ac.uk/international or email international@edgehill.ac.uk with any queries about overseas study.

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Course Changes

This page outlines any material changes to course content, programme structure, assessment methods, entry criteria, and modes of study or delivery, implemented since 1st September 2015.

9th June 2016 - New Module Added

A Language module is now available as a Year 3 option, providing Language modules were studied in Years 1 and 2.

21st April 2016 - Change of Modules

WRI1018 Introduction to Poetry (20 credits) replaces WRI1010 Introduction to Poetry (20 credits), WRI1019 Introduction to Fiction (20 credits) replaces WRI1011 Introduction to Fiction (20 credits), and WRI1020 Introduction to Scriptwriting (20 credits) replaces WRI1012 Introduction to Scriptwriting (20 credits) in Year 1. FLM1012 Cinema in Context: 1895-1945 (20 credits) and FLM1015 Cinema in Context: 1945-Present (20 credits) removed as optional modules in Year 1. There is also now the option of selecting a Language module in French, Spanish or Mandarin as an integral part of this degree in Year 1.

WRI2023 The Art of Poetry (20 credits) replaces WRI2010 The Art of Poetry (20 credits), WRI2024 Writing Short Stories (20 credits) replaces WRI2011 Writing Short Stories (20 credits), and WRI2025 The Art of Scriptwriting (20 credits) replaces WRI2012 The Art of Scriptwriting (20 credits) in Year 2. FLM2031 Realism and the Cinema (20 credits) and FLM2034 Identity and Representation (20 credits) removed as optional modules in Year 2. A Language module is also available as a Year 2 option, providing a Language module was studied in Year 1.

WRI3021 Poetry and Innovative Form (20 credits) replaces WRI3010 Poetry and Innovative Form (20 credits), WRI3022 Advanced Fiction Writing (20 credits) replaces WRI3011 Advanced Fiction Writing (20 credits), and WRI3023 The Art of Screenwriting (20 credits) replaces WRI3012 The Art of Screenwriting (20 credits) in Year 3. FLM3022 Cinema and National Identity (20 credits), FLM3023 Cult Cinema (20 credits), FLM3026 Non-Western Cinema Case Study (20 credits), FLM3027 Animation and the Cinema (20 credits, and FLM3038 Contemporary Film Culture and Future Cinemas (20 credits) removed as optional modules in Year 3.