Research Seminars

As part of ongoing research work the Department of Computer Science runs a regular research seminar series. The aim is to ensure a regular exchange of ideas within the department, Edge Hill University, and the wider research community. Everybody is welcome and there is no need to book. For further details, please contact Yannis Korkontzelos.

seminar

Evolution of Cloud Computing for the Developer

Mr Mark Walters, Lead Developer at DOOR Ventures Inc, Liverpool
Thursday 22th of November 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Software is useless unless it gets deployed and used. This means having it hosted on a platform which is increasingly likely to be cloud based. Mr Walters will talk about his experience of developing and deploying software over the years as cloud computing has become more prominent and how he sees the latest cloud offerings affecting software development.

Speaker’s Biography: Mr Mark Walters is a developer with over 20 years’ experience of delivery of a large range of enterprise level software products, middleware and tooling, having worked for Cognos, IBM and Experian. His latest role is lead developer for “Door” – a fintech startup.

 

Autumn 2018

Dr Xu Zhu, Thursday 6th of December 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre: Full-Duplex Wireless Networks: From Communication to Security

Full-Duplex Wireless Networks: From Communication to Security

Dr Xu Zhu, Reader in Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Department of Electrical Engineering & Electronics, University of Liverpool
Thursday 6th of December 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Fifth generation (5G) wireless communications is calling for Gbps-level data rate (up to 1000 times higher than that of 4G) for much richer multimedia applications. Full-duplex (FD) technique, which allows simultaneous reception and transmission on the same frequency, has been considered as a promising solution to enhancing data rate. On the other hand, it suffers from self-interference and requires higher power consumption than half-duplex (HD) transmission. In this talk, a few pieces of edge-cutting FD related research work are presented, including millimeter (mm)-wave FD relay system, bi-directional FD distributed antenna (DA) system and FD cooperative non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) system. To make those FD networks “green”, a number of novel algorithms are presented to optimise the energy-efficiency (EE) for communications. In addition, research work on physical layer security is also presented for a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FD relay system, where beamforming is used to maximise the secrecy rate of a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) relay system. An FD/HD hybrid system is also presented to make a good tradeoff between secrecy rate and complexity.

Speaker’s Biography: Dr Xu (Judy) Zhu is a Reader at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, the University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. She received the BEng degree with the first class honours from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China, in 1999, and the PhD degree from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, in 2003. Following her PhD, she joined the University of Liverpool as an academic staff member. Dr. Zhu has over 160 peer-reviewed publications on communications and signal processing, and has received a research income of over £1.5M from various funding bodies (EPSRC, Innovate UK etc.). Her research interests include MIMO, channel equalization, cooperative communications, cognitive radio, cross-layer optimization, smart grid communications, green communications, etc. She was an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications from 2012 to 2017, and a Guest Editor for a number of international journals such as Electronics. She has served as a chair for various international conferences, such as Symposium Co-Chair of IEEE ICC 2016 and 2019, Vice-Chair of the 2006 and 2008 ICARN International Workshops, Program Chair of ICSAI 2012, and Publicity Chair of IEEE IUCC-2016.

Mr Mark Walters, Thursday 22th of November 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre: Evolution of Cloud Computing for the Developer

Evolution of Cloud Computing for the Developer

Mr Mark Walters, Lead Developer at DOOR Ventures Inc, Liverpool
Thursday 22th of November 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Software is useless unless it gets deployed and used. This means having it hosted on a platform which is increasingly likely to be cloud based. Mr Walters will talk about his experience of developing and deploying software over the years as cloud computing has become more prominent and how he sees the latest cloud offerings affecting software development.

Speaker’s Biography: Mr Mark Walters is a developer with over 20 years’ experience of delivery of a large range of enterprise level software products, middleware and tooling, having worked for Cognos, IBM and Experian. His latest role is lead developer for “Door” – a fintech startup.

Μr Oladotun Omosebi, Thursday 8th of November 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre: Introduction to Mobile App Development Ecosystem

Introduction to Mobile App Development Ecosystem

Μr Oladotun Omosebi, PhD Student and Teaching Assistant, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Thursday 8th of November 2018, 6.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

The proliferation of mobile devices in the form of smartphones and wearables has in recent times enabled an atmosphere for instant data access and improved business to consumer relationships. The emerging Internet of Things (IoT) is bound to deepen the use of such mobile devices and extend its application beyond human control and consumption into autonomous machine-to-machine interactions. The new IoT ecosystem is bound to introduce new innovative applications that will enable the creation of intelligent smart city functions, smart energy monitoring, self-driving cars, smart clothing and smart homes.

Beyond being used as personal information devices, smartphones and wearables are considered to provide a platform for research in various studies, as well as the implementation of new innovative services (Berenguer et al., 2017). Over time and due to industrial competition, they have become powerful devices capable of performing more intelligent functions that require high level data processing and analysis. This establishes a unique opportunity to apply such devices into situations that require advanced sensing, monitoring and analytics. Thus, they have been applied in areas such as health (Aguilera-Astudillo et al., 2016), natural event simulations (Yamamoto and Mizuno, 2018), digital signal processing (Kehtarnavaz et al., 2015), augmented and virtual reality (Bolas et al., 2013), etc.

Due to the huge ecosystem of mobile apps and devices, this discussion will be limited to the application of mobile applications to a particular real-life use-case. The usage of a use case will tend to limit the essential technologies that will be discussed, but will nonetheless, illustrate how similar technologies can be applied in new applications. The discussion will be applicable across all mobile platforms and will talk about the use of various APIs for achieving the aim of a mobile application. Some of the topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Mobile App Ecosystem (Android, Apple, Windows, Hybrid variants)
  • Use Case Description
  • Android App Illustration
  • Mobile App Architectures and APIs (Firebase, Twilio, what3words, Three.js – Visualization, Wikitude Augmented Reality
  • Chat Application Illustration

 

Spring 2018

Prof Euripides GM Petrakis, Thursday 24th of May 2018, 11.00am, TechHub Lecture Theatre: Personal Research Endeavours: Tracing the Future of IoT and Cloud Computing

Personal Research Endeavours: Tracing the Future of IoT and Cloud Computing

Prof Euripides GM Petrakis, Professor & Laboratory Director, Intelligent Systems Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Technical University of Crete (TUC), Greece
Thursday 24th of May 2018, 11.00am, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Internet of Things (IoT) and Cloud computing highlight new requirements for data collection, storage and analysis of user data. In this talk, various aspects of systems design and implementation are discussed with emphasis to remote health monitoring. The use of wearable sensors and their capability of Internet connectivity provides significant benefits in the area of healthcare, where organizations allow a continuous, easy and efficient monitoring of patients’ vital data from anywhere, leading to cost savings in equipment and nursing staff. We present a Cloud based IoT Architecture and system that collects vital user data (e.g. cardiac pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation) on real time. Our solution enables sensor data collection and processing fast and efficient, while users such as medical personnel can subscribe to patient’s data and get notifications. The system is designed based on microservices and includes a notification service for both health care providers and patients minimizing the risk of late response to emergency conditions. Alerts are produced according to predefined rules and on patient specific reaction plans. The work addresses challenges in the area of IoT and e-health which are related with system and data processing constraints (e.g. how data can analyzed fast and efficiently, how we can bring software closer to the data source for faster processing). Incorporating new connectivity solutions (e.g., Low Power Wide Area Network protocols) and the idea of Fog computing into IoT applications are also discussed. Application of the architecture to other use cases include, rehabilitation environments and gesture recognition for enabling new means of user communication and interaction with machines.

Dr E Pournaras, Apr '18: DIAS - A generic and adaptive aggregation service for large-scale decentralized networks

DIAS – A generic and adaptive aggregation service for large-scale decentralized networks

Dr Evangelos Pournaras, Computational Social Science, Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences, ETH Zurich
Thursday 12th of April 2018, 13.00pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

DIAS, the Dynamic Intelligent Aggregation Service is a decentralized middleware mechanism that makes locally available in every node of a network system-wide (global) information without involving centralized computational entities. More specifically, DIAS locally computes almost any aggregation function that receives for input numerical values from all of the nodes in a network. These values represent a property of the nodes. For example, aggregation functions, e.g. AVERAGE, SUMMATION, MAXIMUM, MINIMUM, COUNT, etc, can locally compute information such as the average load of a network, the size of network under scaling/node failures, or the node with the maximum bandwidth. In each of these cases, DIAS does not require any server or centralized authority for storage, processing or computation. In contrast to other related methodologies, aggregation in DIAS is function-independent, routing-independent and adaptive under changing input values during runtime.

Dr O Bagdasa, Mar '18: Transportation management: On the interplay between optimization and equilibrium problems

Transportation management: On the interplay between optimization and equilibrium problems

Dr Ovidiu Bagdasar, Senior Lecturer in Mathematics, College of Engineering and Technology, Department of Electronics, Computing and Mathematics, University of Derby
Thursday 15th of March 2018, 13.00pm, TechHub Board Room

A dilemma often facing motorists is to choose which route should be taken to realise the fastest (i.e. shortest) journey time. The route choices between an origin and destination might typically be a direct main road, a shorter route through narrow side streets in residential areas, or a longer but (potentially) faster journey using a nearby motorway or ring-road. In the absence of effective traffic control measures, an approximate equilibrium travel time results between the routes available. However, this may not be optimal, as faster overall journey times may have resulted had car drivers allocated themselves differently between the routes. In what has become known as the Braess Paradox, this difference between equilibrium and optimal travel times can lead to the decidedly counter-intuitive result, that additions to road capacity, typically through road construction, lead to slower – not faster – car journey times. Here a transportation model where journey time is the only criteria for route choice is solved by dynamic programming, genetic algorithms and numerical or analytical techniques. Results show close links between solutions of certain (discrete and continuous) optimization and equilibrium problems. The effects induced by closing certain road segments are also investigated.

 

Autumn 2017

Dr S Sotiriadis, Nov '17: Detecting Resource Anomalies on the Cloud

Detecting Resource Anomalies on the Cloud

Dr Stelios Sotiriadis, Research Fellow, The Edward Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada
Thursday 16th of November 2017, 12.30pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Dr T French, Nov '17: The Dark Web: Cyber-Sec Intelligence Gathering Opportunities, Risks & Rewards: A Semiotic Analysis

The “Dark Web”: Cyber-Sec Intelligence Gathering Opportunities, Risks & Rewards: A Semiotic Analysis

Dr Tim French, School of Computer Science & Technology, University of Bedfordshire
Thursday 2nd of November 2017, 10.30pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

We offer a partial articulation of the threats and opportunities posed by the so-called Dark Web (DW). We propose a novel DW attack detection and prediction model. Signalling aspects are considered wherein the DW is seen to comprise a low cost signalling environment.This holds inherent dangers as well as rewards for investigators, as well as those with criminal intent. Suspected DW perpetrators typically act entirely in their own self-interest e.g. illicit financial gain, terrorism, propagation of extremist views, extreme forms of racism, pornography, and politics; so-called ‘radicalisation’. DW investigators therefore need to be suitably risk aware such that the construction of a credible legally admissible, robust evidence trail does not expose investigators to undue operational or legal risk.

Dr Tim French PhD MA FBCS FHEA MIET. Has c. 30 yrs. experience in HE teaching and research, supervising and examining PhD students and teaching a wide range of units at MSc and BSc levels, mainly in the fields of Computer Science, Software Engineering and Business Information Systems. Published over 50+ academic papers, both Journal and Conference. Active member of several specialist BCS groups, most of those in the security domain. Currently, Visiting Research Fellow London School of Commerce, main role supervising the supervisor’s of PhD/DBA students. Also freelance Cyber-Security advisor to Charity/Public Sector organisations. Since completing (a then pioneering) MA in Computer Studies in Musicology at Nottingham University in 1984. worked both in industry and hen mainly “New” University sector as S/L Computer Science/Industrial Fellow. Always sought to address the interface as between Business, Humanities and Computing, by engaging actively in the Organisational Semiotics community of interest, gaining a PhD in E-Trust in 2009 at Reading University, by part-time study (joint: School of Systems Engineering / Henley Business School).

Dr R Nawaz, Oct '17: Events, Meta-Knowledge and Extremism - The Adventures of a Text Miner

Events, Meta-Knowledge and Extremism – The Adventures of a Text Miner

Dr Raheel Nawaz, School of Computing, Mathematics and Digital Technologies, Manchester Metropolitan University
Thursday 19th of October 2017, 12.30pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Part-1: An introduction to event extraction followed by an introduction to meta-knowledge – what is a textual event? How can it de described and extracted? Why is this useful? What is meta-knowledge? Why is it useful?

Part-2: Brief introduction to mining extremist/radical/hate speech. How to identify extremist/radical/hate speech? How to characterise it? How to extract it? Why is it useful?

I Inuwa-Dutse, Sept '17: Data analytics for understanding population movement

Data analytics for understanding population movement

Isa Inuwa-Dutse, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 27th of September 2017, 12.30pm, TechHub Lecture Theatre

Social media is now an indispensable space that support complex networks and interactions of various users via popular public sites such as Twitter and Facebook. Focus of this talk is on the use of social media data toward understanding aspects of humans livea as discuss in social media space. Consequently, the focus will be on how to explore the social media data pertaining population movement, appropriate method to use and the applicability of text mining related techniques will be presented.

 

Spring 2017

P Hewage, Mar '17: Understanding the impact of introducing climate modelling to a community of users

Understanding the impact of introducing climate modelling to a community of users

Pradeep Hewage, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 29th of March 2017, 2pm, TechHub Meeting Room

Non-predictive or inaccurate weather forecasting can severely impact the farmer’s ability to engage in activities like ploughing, fertilising, cultivating, and others; resulting in a direct impact on the resources that a farmer requires to carry out these operations. This research aims to configure a numerical weather prediction system called Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model based on other external parameters and the historical data to obtain an operational, costumes, and more accurate weather prediction system for the farmers. This research requires the combination of the predictive data from WRF output, historical data, physics data from sensor devices which are located across field systems, and farm data to get an intelligent and reactive output for an award-winning precision farming service provider. These data will be collated and used to train a neural network to identify emergent patterns for the purposes of making future predictions, and thereby decisions, informed by historical events.

Dr H Zhang, Feb '17: Detecting and Recognising Objects: My Practice in Imagery

Detecting and Recognising Objects: My Practice in Imagery

Dr Huaizhong Zhang
Wednesday 8th22nd of February 2017, 2pm, TechHub Meeting Room

Object detection, tracking and recognition in images are key problems in computer vision. A variety of techniques have been involved into this scientific domain, particularly variational and stochastic aspects. Referring to my previous studies and activities, this talk provides the audience with a balanced treatment between the theory and practice of relevant methods in the area.

Emphasis on the following points:

  • Statistical based methods for boundary finding
  • Graph based ROI detection in medical images
  • Level sets and PDE for image segmentation
  • Deformable modelling for object detection and reconstruction
  • Deep learning based object recognition and tracking

Dr G Kontonatsios, Jan '17: Can computers understand text? Text mining methods for machine translation, word sense disambiguation and document classification

Can computers understand text? Text mining methods for machine translation, word sense disambiguation and document classification

Dr Georgios Kontonatsios, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 25th of January 2017, 1pm, TechHub Meeting Room

Text mining is an emerging field of artificial intelligence that deals with computer processing and understanding of natural language. In this talk, we will cover intelligent text mining approaches that employ rule-based and machine learning methods to make sense of natural language encoded in text. Specifically, we will discuss machine translation methods that are able to translate terms across languages, word sense disambiguation techniques that identify the correct meaning of ambiguous words and text classification methods that determine the topic a given document. Finally, deep learning representation techniques will be introduced that have the potential to further improve the performance of text mining algorithms.

 

Autumn 2016

Dr P Vangorp, Dec '16: My Past Experience with a CAVE

My Past Experience with a CAVE

Dr Peter Vangorp, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 14th of December 2016, 1pm, TechHub G08

In this talk I will outline my past research on navigation and interaction in a CAVE, and the problems I encountered along the way, which include:

  • everybody does stereoscopic 3D wrong,
  • natural interaction with life-size architectural models requires long arms,
  • people walking face-first into the screen are a sign of success, and
  • coming up with CAVE projects is hard, but porting projects to a CAVE is easy.

I will try to impart as many nuggets of CAVE wisdom as I can, to encourage more of you to use the CAVE for research and education.

Dr M Trovati, Nov '16: Topological Data Analysis: An Overview

Topological Data Analysis: An Overview

Dr Marcello Trovati, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 30th of November 2016, 1pm, TechHub G08

Data science is, by its very nature, a multidisciplinary research field, which incorporates a variety of theoretical and applied methods and techniques. The extraction of relevant and accurate information from high-dimensional datasets poses a variety of challenges. Topological Data Analysis (TDA) provides a general framework to investigate such data to enable a better approach to dimension reduction and robustness to noise. In my talk I will discuss the current approaches and new research directions in this field.

Dr Q Sun, Nov '16: Researcher, Or Scientific Software Developer?

Researcher, Or Scientific Software Developer?

Dr Quanbin Sun, Department of Computer Science
Wednesday 16th of November 2016, 12pm, TechHub G03

  • Crowd modelling, behavioural modelling, and crowd simulation
  • Software development and informatics
  • Visual Reality in architecture, construction, and built environment

Dr T Y Win, Nov '16: Big Data based Security Analytics in CyberSecurity

Big Data based Security Analytics in CyberSecurity

T Y (Thomas) Win (Dr.) MBCS MSc (Computer Science) MSc (Info.Sys & Bus.Mgmt), School of Computing and Technology, University of Gloucestershire
Wednesday 9th of November 2016, 1pm, TechHub G08

Big Data analytics refers to the extraction of meaningful insights from the large amounts of data which are collected from different data sources, and has been used in a wide variety of fields such as marketing (sentiment analytics) and banking (fraud detection). The increase in the number of Internet-connected connected devices in recent times has resulted in an increase in the amount of real-time user data generated by the devices. In addition it has also opened up different venues for cyberattackers to launch attacks with the goal of stealing sensitive user information and compromising the integrity of network infrastructures. Security analytics refers to the application of Big Data analytics in the context of cybersecurity, and it involves the collection of a variety of data from different network points within a network in order to determine the presence of a cybersecurity attack. The presentation of the research seminar will look at:

  • Big Data and Big Data analytics
  • Different cybersecurity attacks
  • What security analytics is and how Big Data is leveraged to detect attack presence
  • Big data analytics infrastructure and how the different tools can be leveraged in real-time security analytics

ThuWinResearchSeminarSlides

 

Spring 2016

S Canning, Apr '16: “If I can’t find it, what then?” - Reviewing the VLE Baseline Standards

“If I can’t find it, what then?” – Reviewing the VLE Baseline Standards

Susan Canning, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 26th of April 2016, 1pm, CE 206

The purpose of this multi-staged research project was to explore what students and staff, within the Department of Computer Science (DoC) at Edge Hill University, consider ‘good practice’ in the use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The project used a phenomenological approach using qualitative inquiry to provide an in-depth analysis of the experiences of a small sample of undergraduate students studying Computing and explores the use of a VLE from the viewpoint of academic staff. This presentation will report the student perceptions of what is ‘good practice’ and the recognition of student-defined examples of good practice on a VLE as well as the views of tutors who teach and have the responsibility of designing modules, in the Department of Computer Science.

O Ehizojie, Apr '16: An Investigation into Dependability Issues in Internet of Things driven Applications

An Investigation into Dependability Issues in Internet of Things driven Applications

Ojie Ehizojie, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 12th of April 2016, 1pm, CE 206

Nowadays, we are witnessing a formation of a new technological marvel: Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is driven by an expansion of the Internet through the inclusion of physical objects combined with an ability to provide smarter services to the environment as more data becomes available. This construction is able to combine in a particular operational entity all the bits and pieces of the world around us. This concept has been able to be integrated into various fields which includes the health care sector, transportation sectors, smart cities and various areas of human endeavour to make life a better and easy place for mankind. Hence, it is very important that the IoT applications are dependable, perform as they were designed to perform, survive changing environments, recover failures and function in a secure manner.

P Alston, Mar '16: ‘Stepping into the unknown’ - Assessment Practices in a Digital Age

‘Stepping into the unknown’ – Assessment Practices in a Digital Age

Peter Alston, School of Life Sciences, University of Liverpool
Tuesday 8th of March 2016, 1pm, CE 206

The advent of online learning is having an impact on policy and practice in many universities around the world and is quickly becoming common place in higher education. Teaching and learning in an online environment is now becoming more commonplace within an educator’s everyday practices and in general, can be more advantageous than traditional instruction. There a variety of reasons for this, in part due to the numerous benefits afforded to both tutors and learners.

This presentation first situates some of the challenges faced by academics using e-assessment, by highlighting the issues raised by a group of academics implementing a continuous online assessment strategy within the Life Sciences. The department’s rationale for adopting continuous assessment will then be discussed, along with how, working with an external content provider, an online assessment strategy was implemented into the first year of undergraduate degree programs. With a strategic responsibility for TEL within the department, I will then highlight some of the challenges that we have faced in implementing such a strategy and share the lessons we have learned in the hope of informing others who plan to embark on such a journey.

Everybody, Feb '16: Academic Speed Dating

Academic Speed Dating

Everybody
Tuesday 23th of February 2016, 1pm, CE 206

Effective research requires the collaboration between academics, both within the Department and across the University. However, this is hard to achieve if nobody is entirely sure what the other people in the Department and University are interested in and what they would like to collaborate on. To address this we will run a one-hour academic speed dating session to help get potential collaborations off the ground. Turn up and find somebody to collaborate with.

Dr Y Korkontzelos, Feb '16: Text is Everywhere! Text Mining tools and applications

Text is Everywhere! Text Mining tools and applications

Dr Yannis Korkontzelos, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 9th of February 2016, 1pm, CE 206

Text Mining (also known as Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and Text Analytics) is a sub-field of artificial intelligence. It involves methods for structuring text, lexical analysis, parsing, information retrieval, pattern recognition, data mining and tagging of meaningful sequences. These basic methods are combined with annotated resources (lexicons, taxonomies and corpora) to address complex tasks such as document classification, relation extraction, entity and event recognition, summarisation, automatic translation, sense disambiguation, opinion mining and sentiment analysis. Text Mining commonly uses linguistic knowledge and machine learning algorithms. Since text is used as a means of communication in all aspects of human activity, Text Mining is a highly interdisciplinary field. The diversity of scientific and non-scientific domains and the intrinsic characteristics of domain-specific text pose different tasks and challenges to be addressed. This presentation will introduce the field of Text Mining and will focus on recent work in the area of multi-word expressions, document classification and clustering.

Dr H Fang, Jan '16: When Visualization Meets Vision

When Visualization Meets Vision

Dr Hui Fang, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 26th of January 2016, 1pm, CE 206

Computer vision is an interdisciplinary subject which aim is developing automatic computerised systems to understand images with high level semantics. During the last couple of decades, many useful vision applications have been designed and deployed in a variety of industrial fields, e.g. Kinect game controller, medical diagnosis tools, and e-Passport gates at U.K. border control, etc. In recent years, the computer vision systems become more and more complicated due to the popularity of advanced machine learning algorithms such as the deep learning methods. Therefore, an intuitive understanding of the feature extraction techniques and classifiers in the systems is urgently required to improve their reliability. In order to serve the purpose, we believe advanced visualization techniques provide an effective way to open the black box and decode the standard pipeline of any vision system. In this presentation, I will introduce our attempts and contributions to the convergence of visualization and vision. Furthermore, current trend will be discussed for shaping our future work.

 

Autumn 2015

C Moscrop, Dec '15: Using technology to engage students and improve attainment

Using technology to engage students and improve attainment

Claire Moscrop, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 15th of December 2015, 1pm, CE 229

This session will give an overview of two small projects, one using software to engage students in large lectures (Socrative), and one using digital assessment guides to improve students access to vital information at their point of need with a view to increasing attainment. In addition to discussing these two projects we will also introduce a possible future project using eye trackers to assess student engagement with and use of written feedback.

Dr A Behera, Dec '15: Autonomous Intelligent Feature for Reducing Driver’s Interaction by Understanding their Behaviour Pattern

Autonomous Intelligent Feature for Reducing Driver’s Interaction by Understanding their Behaviour Pattern

Dr Ardhendu Behera, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 1st of December 2015, 1pm, CE 229

One of the main aim of the self-learning autonomous vehicle is to reduce driver workload and enhance driver experience, and is based on the concept of “cognitive car”. Both safety and comfort are important themes in the “cognitive car” research and are correlated. This piece of research will be focused on studies involving human-driver-side (drivers’ actions and behaviours) and is fundamental to in-vehicle cognitive technologies which will be a key component of how vehicles learn and reason to provide a better driving experience for her occupants and optimise its own performance. Previous researches are mostly focused on roads and vehicles, and have made considerable progress whereas the part regarding drivers has been left behind. We will explore this by considering drivers are not only the subject of the driving activity, but also viewed as a sensor which can be used by vehicles to learn and evaluate the driving experience. Facial expression provides cues about emotion, intention, alertness and behaviour among other functions. The research will explore the facial expression over time to model the driver-specifics behaviour pattern that will help the “cognitive car” to understand its driver.

C Shill, Nov '15: Applicability of Machine-to-Machine Communication in Smart Grid Home Area Networks

Applicability of Machine-to-Machine Communication in Smart Grid Home Area Networks

Chandon Shill, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 17th of November 2015, 1pm, CE 225

The talk will focus on the critical review of existing M2M communication architecture for Smart Grid Home Area Network.

D Campbell, Dr M Hall, Dr B Nicholson, Nov '15: Having a Laugh: Making Transcription Fun

Having a Laugh: Making Transcription Fun

Daniel Campbell & Dr Mark Hall, Department of Computer Science, Dr Bob Nicholson, Department of History, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 3rd of November 2015, 1pm, CE 225229

Museums, Archive, and Libraries have built up massive collections of our cultural heritage in all its forms. To open up the archives, cultural heritage institutions have engaged in extensive digitisation projects where they have scanned, photographed, and annotated their archival holdings and then made these available via their web-sites. The problem with this is that for some artifacts, such newspaper archives, digitisation is not enough; the text needs to be manually transcribed from the images in order to make the data useful. This is a relatively boring process and cultural heritage institutions have tried to make it more “engaging” by adding game-like elements such as score-boards. While this works, the game-like mechanics creates a focus on quantity of work rather than quality. What this project aims to do is to investigate whether using “meaningful” rewards instead of the game-like elements can encourage people to produce higher quality transcriptions. To do this the project will look at transcribing a collection of 19th century newspaper jokes. The goal is to develop novel algorithms that turn the joke’s text into a comic representation as the user transcribes the joke. This will give the user a meaningful reward, as they can share the comic with their friends, and will also increase the transcription quality as the user can see the benefit of putting more effort into their work. The project is a collaboration between the Department of Computer Science and the Department of History, drawing together their respective strengths in order to fulfil the project’s aims.

Prof D Romano, Oct '15: From Serious Games to Intelligent Simulations: My Research Journey

From Serious Games to Intelligent Simulations: My Research Journey

Prof. Daniela Romano, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 20th of October 2015, 1pm, CE 225224

Prof Daniela Romano will present her research interests and some of her current projects.

Dr M Hall, Oct '15: Successful Ethics Applications

Successful Ethics Applications

Dr Mark Hall, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 6th of October 2015, 1pm, CE 225

In the modern research context ensuring that your research is ethical has become an aspect that is strictly controlled. The main element of control is the ethics approval process, which requires the researcher to specify what exactly they will be doing and how they will deal with any ethical issues. This talk will look at what ethics reviewers are looking at and at how to write ethics approval documents that pass this scrutiny process.

 

Spring 2015

H Bryan, May '15: Assisted Living: A Strategy to Bridge the Technology Gap

Assisted Living: A Strategy to Bridge the Technology Gap

Howard Bryan, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 19th of May 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Recent austerity measures have delivered funding caps to the National Health Service at a time when demand for its services is set to increase. To ensure the continued delivery of these vital services the government has proposed a new and more efficient model of healthcare which involves treating patients at home. This has placed greater emphasis on assisted living and the increased use of technology for the remote monitoring of patients. However the suite of technologies required to properly deliver these services is not yet fully developed. In this talk I propose a strategy which includes two areas of Edge Hill University research, to help bridge the technology gap, deliver a more efficient model of healthcare and contribute towards meeting the demands of the government’s austerity measures.

D Campbell, May '15: Exploring the use of ontologies for the development of mobile Health applications

Exploring the use of ontologies for the development of mobile Health applications

Dan Campbell, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 12th of May 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Ontologies are providing intuitive solutions some of computer sciences biggest challenges and the aim of this research seminar is to provide a brief insight into the world of ontologies and explore how they are being utilised. Followed by a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of different ontology modelling techniques in relation to mobile application Development.

D Kay, Apr '15: Using Type 2 virtualization as a cybersecurity teaching tool within Edge Hill University

Using Type 2 virtualization as a cybersecurity teaching tool within Edge Hill University

Daniel Kay, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 21st of April 2015, 1pm, CE 206

The computing department within Edge Hill University is rapidly expanding and student numbers are on the rise, year by year the requirement for specialised software and operating systems for teaching modules has grown. The current solution is no longer compatible with the needs of the department and therefore a new solution must be adopted.

Virtualization is a rapidly growing area within computing, with this talk looking at effective methods of utilising virtualization within the computing department at Edge Hill University. What are the types of virtualization and what software/hardware they require? And how to set up virtual machines to use as effective teaching tools for subjects and modules within cybersecurity and finally identifying what the benefits and limitations of virtualization are.

P Johnston, Mar '15: Four favorite hacking techniques

Four favorite hacking techniques

Paul Johnston, Pentest, Altrincham, UK
Tuesday 24th of March 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Basic mistakes while building and deploying web sites leave vulnerabilities that hackers can attack. Here we describe four common attack techniques, including a live demonstration against a vulnerable site, and suggestions for fixing the flaws.

Dr M Lassnig, Mar '15: Distributed Data Management in the High-Energy Physics Experiment ATLAS

Distributed Data Management in the High-Energy Physics Experiment ATLAS

Dr. Mario Lassnig, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
Tuesday 10th of March 2015, 1pm, CE 206

The high-energy physics experiment ATLAS studies collision events of accelerated particles, produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The detector readout data rate, analysis of the event data, as well as the production of simulated collision events, necessitates a sophisticated management system for globally distributed datasets. Currently the system manages a volume of hundreds of Petabytes, in a billion files, organised in millions of datasets, accessed by thousands of users, and stored in hundreds of data centres. In this talk, highlights of this data management system are presented, including reliability and throughput features, volume and latency handling, as well as dynamic data placement.

A Akinbi, Feb '15: Identifying Critical Security Areas in PAAS clouds

Identifying Critical Security Areas in PAAS clouds

Alex Akinbi, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 24th of February 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Information Technology experts cite security and privacy concerns, operational challenges or inability to control information once it leaves the perimeter as the major challenge in the adoption of cloud computing. On PaaS clouds, they want to be able to select service providers and evaluate security implementations based on their security requirements.

This study aims to enable experts and customers the ability to review details of or examine the security implementation, processes, and procedures of PaaS Cloud model. Using an adaptive security model, the study uses a quantitative methodology and presents findings of numeric data that shows critical architectures within the PaaS environment where security can be evaluated and security controls assessed. The model can be used across different types of PaaS cloud models based on individual security requirements and service level objectives identified by PaaS cloud customers.

P Matthew, Feb '15: The Development of a Liveness and Coercion Detection Taxonomy

The Development of a Liveness and Coercion Detection Taxonomy

Peter Matthew, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 10th of February 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Liveness detection in biometric systems has become an integral part of system viability, but it has innate disadvantages concerning implementation, situational suitability and acceptance. In this talk I will look at the potential for combining liveness detection techniques with autonomous concepts to minimize, negate or even improve the original system. This is done by considering two potential areas within the autonomous system purview, autonomous architectures and the human nervous system paradigm. Within each there are a number of areas that could accept liveness detection incorporation and potentially improve each applicable subsystem. I will cover an introduction into these topics and a discussion about their suitability.

J Coleman, Jan '15: Metadata and the Privacy and Security Debate in the UK

Metadata and the Privacy and Security Debate in the UK

James Coleman, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 27th of January 2015, 1pm, CE 206

Over recent years the UK Government has put forward a number of proposals to improve the capacity of the police and security services to make the UK safe for all people. At the same time groups like Liberty, the LibDems and Labour (now that they are out of office) have opposed these ideas on the grounds that they are an unnecessary invasion of our privacy.

What is metadata and why is it so important? How are proposals on metadata (and other ideas) different from what is currently permissible and should we be concerned about some of the proposals from the Home Secretary and the Prime minister? Is it possible to develop a framework for security and privacy that means that the State can carry out its duty to protect Society while at the same time ensuring there is that level of privacy that is so necessary for a democratic society to function properly and which we should be able to rely on?

 

Autumn 2014

D Walsh, Dec '14: Interactive Social Book Search

Interactive Social Book Search

David Walsh, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 16th of December 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Users looking for books online are confronted with both professional meta-data and user-generated content. The goal of the Interactive Social Book Search Track at CLEF 2015 (Conference and Labs of the Evaluation Forum) was to investigate how users used these two sources of information, when looking for books in a leisure context. To this end participants recruited by four teams performed two different tasks using one of two book-search interfaces. Additionally one of the two interfaces also investigated whether user performance can be improved by providing a user-interface that supports multiple search stages. In this talk we will present a first look at how users interacted with the experimental interfaces.

B Farrimond, Prof M Anderson, Dr E Pereira, Dec '14: Parametric and deductive 3D visualisations for primary education and heritage

Parametric and deductive 3D visualisations for primary education and heritage

Brian Farrimond, Professor Mark Anderson, Dr Ella Pereira, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 2nd of December 2014, 1pm, CE 206

The 3D Parametric Modelling Project is based in the Department of Computer Science at Edge Hill University. It explores methods of automating the creation of 3D visualisations from textual data. Applications developed to date are being trialled in primary schools and in the heritage industry.

This presentation describes the progress made in developing tools for non-specialist users such as primary school children and heritage enthusiasts that enable them to create information-rich, realistic 3D visualisations. The presentation places this progress in the context of general advances in software development.

The operation of the tools and examples of the work of children will be demonstrated. Future directions and opportunities for research and student projects will be discussed.

G Garge, Nov '14: Mobile Payments - Ready for Smart Cities?

Mobile Payments – Ready for Smart Cities?

Gopi Garge, Fellow, IPv6 Forum
Tuesday 18th of November 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Almost all conventional processes and systems have been impacted by the Internet and its associated technologies. The arrival of the smart phone and 4G connectivity will further empower the user by providing effective access and resources anytime, anywhere. The Banking and Finance industry, has had an impact, which manifest as mobile banking and related activities. Payments are also moving into the smart phone space as is evidenced by contactless card payments, the Paym service launched by a few UK banks in June 2014 and Apple gearing up to provide a payment service.

The talk begins with a brief introduction to the payment systems and delves into the various developments over the last decade. The discussions on payment systems in literature and a short discussion on the current industry trends will follow. The requirements of payment systems in the context of smart cities and the suitability of existing payment systems to a smart city user’s requirements will be discussed and the talk will end with presenting a potential solution for a smart city.

Dr M Hall, Nov '14: Explore the Stacks

Explore the StacksThe Development of a Liveness and Coercion Detection Taxonomy

Dr Mark Hall Peter Matthew, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 4th 11th of November 2014, 1pm, CE 206

In recent years large digital library collections have become available, for example Europeana holds over 22 million items, while the British Library (BL) bibliographic data contains over 14 million records. However, this vast amount of material can also be difficult to access since users are provided with little or no guidance on the information in these collections. Systems typically offer keyword-based search interfaces, which are well-suited for expert users, but which do not support non-expert users, who are often unfamiliar with the collections and struggle to formulate appropriate queries.

Alternative systems have been developed that enable collection discovery and exploration for the novice user, however these are still primarily built around the concept of search, even if they provide additional support to the user. Thus there remains a need for systems that focus on letting the user overview and explore the collection.

The aim of the “Explore the Stacks” project is to develop a number of interfaces that can be placed on top of existing digital library (DL) systems and that provide novice and experienced uses with the ability to gain an overview over the topics in a large DL. The aim of the project is to draw together ideas developed in previous work and conduct extensive evaluations on what kinds of visualisations and interfaces work best for which users and which tasks.

J. Collins, D. Owens, Oct '14: How to make errors in software - and how to find and fix them automatically

How to make errors in software – and how to find and fix them automatically

John Collins, Honorary Research Fellow, Edge Hill University, Research Associate, University of Cape Town, Technical Director, SimCon Ltd and Darryl Owens, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 21st of October 2014, 1pm, CE 206

We discuss the different classes of computer program errors, and software tools by which they can be detected and corrected automatically. We compare an industrial product which carries out error correction for a specific language with an academic system with generic applicability to many software environments.

Dr. A Behera, Oct '14: The impact of the internet data explosion on computer vision research and development

The impact of the internet data explosion on computer vision research and development

Dr. Ardhendu Behera, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University
Tuesday 7th of October 2014, 1pm, CE 206

The talk will focus on the role of computer vision in recent buzz ‘Big Data and Analytics’. The research is focused on analysing image and video data as more and more data are available in the form of pixels. For example, more than 350 million photos are uploaded to Facebook every day. The talk will give an overview over computer vision’s achievements and what the possible future challenges are. Finally, the talk will cover previous research projects in which I have applied computer vision for understanding human action, activity and behaviour through video analysis.

 

Spring 2014

C Hughes, May '14: Research, development and innovation-project mapping

Research, development and innovation-project mapping

Chris Hughes, RESO, Edge Hill University

Tuesday 20th of May 2014, 1pm, CE 206

An overview over research classification systems.

D Owens, May '14: Facilitating Automated Quality Assurance

Facilitating Automated Quality Assurance

Darryl Owens, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Tuesday 6th of May 2014, 1pm, CE 206
Tuesday 29th of April 2014, 1pm, CE 206

An introduction to the framework for language independent quality assurance, covering the current state of the research and future plans.

D Campbell, Apr '14: Ontology for Mobile Health Application Development

Ontology for Mobile Health Application Development

Daniel Campbell, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Tuesday 1st of April 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Mobile computing has already had a considerable impact on the delivery of healthcare, devices such as smartphones and tablets alongside intuitive mHealth applications provide an effective resource that can promote long-term wellbeing and independence, improving the quality of care the individual receives. mHealth applications provide the users with a variety of tools which can reduce the constraints of an illness, aid in the diagnosis, intervene or promote health.

When developing mHealth applications it is critical that they are tailored and integral to the user. Developing personalised mHealth applications on demand isn’t cost effective, nor is it practical to do so using traditional development methods and techniques. Since the main stakeholders in the healthcare delivery process are the patients there is a need for healthcare and medical professionals to become the developers. Utilising their domain expertise this way enables for a more pervasive and ubiquitous method for healthcare and medical delivery process.

This seminar will present an ontology driven approach for the development of a cloud based framework that will provide Healthcare and Medical professionals with an environment for developing personalised mHealth applications for their patients and service users with out the need for application development domain expertise.

B Mustafa, Mar '14: Smart monitoring for Assisted Living Support

Smart monitoring for Assisted Living Support

Besim Mustafa, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Tuesday 18th of March 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Smart monitoring and Adaptive Lifestyle Pattern Recognition techniques are proposed to support Assisted Living. We are working in partnership with a local security systems company to develop advanced monitoring hardware and software using these techniques at commercial scale. The presentation covers the highlights of our work in this area so far.

Dr J Haggerty, Mar '14: Triaging Computer Forensics Evidence through Data Visualization

Triaging Computer Forensics Evidence through Data Visualization

Dr John Haggerty, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University

Tuesday 4th of March 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Digital forensics investigations involve the analysis of a wide range data from a variety of sources to provide evidence and culpability for an event or set of events. This large volume data analysis is often conducted to tight temporal constraints and therefore recent research has focused on evidence triage to aid the investigatory process. One approach to evidence triage is to use visual analytics, automated data mining and visualisation, to represent potentially large data sets. This paper discusses recent research in this area and how it may be used to aid the digital forensics examiner to identify key evidence during an investigation.

Dr I Cooper, Feb '14: Temporal Keyword Extraction from Migratory Topic Content

Temporal Keyword Extraction from Migratory Topic Content

Dr Ian Cooper, School of Computer Science & Informatics, Cardiff University

Tuesday 18th of February 2014, 1pm, CE 206

The seminar examines temporal keyword extraction from migratory topic content and presents novel algorithms to repeatedly extract currently relevant keywords from an information stream that is being sequentially processed. In order to evaluate these approaches novel evaluation methods are required, allowing efficient repeatable use of human evaluation effort. The conclusion is that the use of aggregated human powered keyword extraction methods to compare against developed keyword extraction tools, is an efficient method of evaluation for keyword detection within a migratory topic environment.

Dr M Anderson, Feb '14: Cultivating Research

Cultivating Research

Dr Mark Anderson, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Tuesday 4th of February 2014, 1pm, CE 206

Over the past 3 years, the Data Analysis and Representation research group has built a broad ranging portfolio of research projects. Working with national and international partners, the opportunities for engaging with diverse projects has grown. The recently granted centre for research, which links to the university research institutes, has been an acknowledgement of the work that has been successfully undertaken. Alongside the research projects, two Knowledge Transfer Partnerships have commenced as has been the proposal for the INSPIRE initiative to engage Early Career Researchers and students with ongoing project work. This seminar will offer an overview of the work underway, update on the progress of the research projects and also seek to explore the opportunities for more staff and students to become involved in the activities that are in progress (or developing).

 

Autumn 2013

Dr C Balakrishna, Dec '13: Mobile Technologies as a Smart Cities enabler

Mobile Technologies as a Smart Cities enabler

Dr Chitra Balakrishna, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Thursday 19th of December 2013, 5pm, CE 229

Smart mobile devices are fast becoming the epicentre of people’s lives. Smart phones today are embedded with powerful and programmable sensors such as GPS, gyroscope, microphone, camera, accelerometer etc. These sensor-enabled smart-phones would form an important element of the future networked-infrastructure. A new wave of services is bound to erupt from such connected infrastructure and smart devices that will influence all aspects of our social ecosystem. It is in this context, the concept of Smart cities has emerged. This research talk presents the Mobile Technology-perspective of Smart cities while highlighting the open and emerging research challenges in this landscape.

Dr P Matthew, Dec '13: Autonomous Synergy with Biometric Security and Liveness Detection

Autonomous Synergy with Biometric Security and Liveness Detection

Peter Matthew, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Thursday 5th of December 2013, 5pm, CE 229

Liveness detection in biometric systems has become an integral part of system viability, but it has innate disadvantages concerning implementation, situational suitability and acceptance. In this talk I will look at the potential for combining liveness detection techniques with autonomous concepts to minimize, negate or even improve the original system. This is done by considering two potential areas within the autonomous system purview, autonomous architectures and the human nervous system paradigm. Within each there are a number of areas that could accept liveness detection incorporation and potentially improve each applicable subsystem. I will cover an introduction into these topics and a discussion about their suitability.

Dr A Akinbi, Nov '13: Identifying security mechanisms implemented on PaaS public clouds

Identifying security mechanisms implemented on PaaS public clouds

Alex Akinbi, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Thursday 21st of November 2013, 5pm, CE 229
Thursday 28th of November 2013, 5pm, CE 229

Cloud computing has become one of the most rapidly developing and popular area of distributed systems. One of the challenges that this new technology is facing is security that prevents its deployment on a larger scale. From the three well establish delivery models, Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), due to its nature, stands out as sensitive to security related challenges. PaaS security is an active area of investigation amongst the information and network security community, however, issues and questions raised by the potential PaaS users have not been fully addressed. This topic discusses some of the key security methods and controls implemented to ensure a secure service delivery model of PaaS public clouds. In particular, by taking a novel approach of segregating PaaS into three core components, it offers a security check-list for evaluating the security of each component of PaaS.

Paper – Alex Akinbi – 28.11.2013

Dr M Hall, Nov '13: Exploring Large Digital Library Collections Using a Map-Based Visualisation

Exploring Large Digital Library Collections Using a Map-Based Visualisation

Dr Mark Hall, Department of Computer Science, Edge Hill University

Thursday 7th of November 2013, 5pm, CE 229

In large digital library collections new users are frequently faced with the problem of finding out what the collection actually contains and whether there is anything that could be of interest to them. The white search box that is frequently the only interface to the collection does not support this task very well. In this talk a novel approach for exploring large document collections using a map-based visualisation is described. Hierarchically structured semantic concepts are attached to the documents and then used to create a visualisation of the semantic space that resembles a Google Map. The approach is novel in that we exploit the hierarchical structure to enable the approach to scale to large document collections and to create a map where the higher levels of spatial abstraction have semantic meaning.

virtual_map

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