Employability Research

EHU308 Biology059- employability research

 

Careers Advisers and staff at Edge Hill University are engaged in research into employability.

 

 

Articles and Papers

Embedding Employability into the Curriculum (HEA, SEP 1)

This research was conducted by a working group at Edge Hill University as part of the HEA’s Strategic Enhancement Programme (SEP 1) – Embedding Employability into the Curriculum 2014-15.

Edge Hill University’s strategic plan  identifies a focused approach to employability as a key element of the strategy to enhance student experience. The SEP research audits and evaluates existing good practice from the viewpoint of students, alumni, departments and the HEA guidance ‘Defining and Developing Your Approach to Employability – A Framework for Higher Education Institutions’ (2013).

Hepworth, S., Beaumont, C., Halligan, D. and Allanson M. (2015) Strategic Enhancement Programme. Embedding Employability into the Curriculum: An Evaluation of Practice in 3 Departments at Edge Hill University. HEA.

Exploring the Role & Perceptions of Academic Staff in Employability Initiatives

This research was conducted by a working group at Edge Hill University as part of the HEA’s Strategic Enhancement Programme (SEP) – Embedding Employability into the Curriculum 2014-15. The project complements concurrent research conducted at Edge Hill as part of the SEP, and known as SEP1: Embedding Employability into the Curriculum: An Evaluation of Practice in 3 Departments at Edge Hill University. That research audited and evaluated existing good practice from the viewpoint of students, alumni, departments and HEA guidance ‘Defining and Developing Your Approach to Employability – A Framework for Higher Education Institutions’ (2013) .

This project (SEP2) explores the role and perceptions of academic staff in employability initiatives, auditing and seeking to identify existing good practice.

Hunter-Barnett, S. Hepworth, S., Beaumont, C. (2015) Strategic Enhancement Programme. Exploring the Role & Perceptions of Academic Staff in Employability Initiatives. HEA.

HEA SEP2

Term-Time Employment and the Student Experience

This paper examines the extent to which term?time employment influences two specific aspects of the student experience in higher education: working collaboratively and preparing for entry into the graduate labour market. The paper also considers the extent to which the students are able to appreciate the inter?relationships that exist between activities such as these.

Greenbank P., Hepworth, S. & Mercer, J. (2009), ‘Term-time employment and the student experience’, Education and Training, Volume 51, Number 1, 2009.

Improving the Career Decision-Making Behaviour of Working Class Students

This paper examines the extent to which economic factors influence the career decision?making process of working class students.

The study involved an initial survey of 165 final?year students from a range of degree programmes. It was followed by in?depth interviews with 30 working class students.

Greenbank, P. & Hepworth, S. (2008/09), ‘Improving the career decision-making behaviour of working class students’, Journal of European Industrial Training. (Vol. 32, No. 7).

Students and Term-time work: Benefit or Hindrance?

This paper examines the extent to which term-time employment influences two particular aspects of the student experience in higher education: working collaboratively and preparing for entry
into the graduate labour market. The study is based on three research projects: an ongoing piece of action research into the factors influencing student engagement in collaborative activities for examination preparation; a related study into attitudes to group work; and a study into how students make career decisions. In all of these studies term-time working was identified as a
factor influencing student engagement in collaborative/group activities and career planning and preparation.

Greenbank, P., Hepworth, S. & Mercer, J. (2008) Students and term-time work: benefit or hindrance? Social Policy and Social Work (SWAP). Monograph, University of Southampton, Southampton. P.76

Working Class Students and the Career Decision-Making Process, A Qualitative Study

This report explores the process of making career decisions and asks how advisers can encourage students to critically evaluate the way they make decisions and plan for their future careers.

The report builds on work carried out for the Higher Education Careers Service Unit (HECSU) by Greenbank and Hepworth (2008). Research suggests that graduates from working class backgrounds tend to perform less well in the labour market (in terms of both obtaining employment and earnings) than their middle–class counterparts (see for example Marshall et al., 1997; Smith et al., 2000; Naylor et al., 2002; Evans, 2002; Furlong and Cartmel, 2005; Redmond, 2006). The Greenbank and Hepworth (2008) study examined the extent to which the way working class students approached career decision-making might contribute to their disadvantage in the labour market.

Greenbank, P. & Hepworth, S. (2008) Working Class Students and the Career Decision-Making Process: a qualitative study, Report for the Higher Education Careers Service Unit (HECSU), Manchester (103 pages).

Working Class Students, the Career Decision-Making Process & Employability

In this article, Dr Paul Greenbank (Reader in Educational Development) and Sue Hepworth (Senior Careers Adviser) from Edge Hill University, report on their research into how working class undergraduates make their career decisions. The findings were explored under three headings: financial issues, networks and values. Implications of the research results and how they are being used to improve on career practice are also discussed.

Existing evidence suggests that working class students are disadvantaged in the graduate labour market because they lack the economic, social and cultural capital possessed by their middle class peers. This study focused on the rationale behind the approach they adopted, and whether it contributes to their disadvantage in the graduate labour market.

Hepworth, S. & Greenbank, P. (2008), ‘Working class students, the career decision-making process and employability’: Graduate Market Trends, Autumn 2008, p. 3.

Career Decision-Making: the ‘Class Factor’

It is often assumed that working class students want to get a graduate level job pretty soon after graduation. A HECSU (Higher Education Careers Service Unit) funded research project at Edge Hill University might cause many people to think otherwise.

With more students from working class backgrounds entering HE, there is mounting evidence to suggest that such students do less well in the graduate labour market. From February to May 2007, we examined how working class students make career decisions. With a focus on the rationale behind the approach they adopt, we wanted to find out how this may contribute to their disadvantage in the labour market.

Hepworth, S. & Greenbank, P. (2007), ‘Career decision-making: the ‘class factor’’, AGCAS Phoenix, Issue 122, Autumn 2007, pp. 34-35.

Researching Working Class Students and the Career Decision-Making Process: Progress to Date

This HECSU funded practitioner research project examined how students from working class backgrounds (defined as unskilled, semiskilled and skilled manual occupations) make career decisions. The research looked at the rationale behind the approach adopted by students and whether this contributed to their disadvantage.

Hepworth, S. & Greenbank, P. (2007), ‘Researching working class students and the career decision-making process: progress to date’ Graduate Market Trends, Autumn 2008, p. 13.

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