YourEHU English, History and Creative Writing – Applicant Visit Day

You will receive an invitation to an Applicant Visit Day by email and post.

These events are your chance to spend some time on-campus before you have to make your firm and insurance choices in May, and for you to find out what it would be like to study and socialise here.

What is it?

You will be able to:

    • take part in a subject taster session, or have a one-to-one session with academic staff from your department – your opportunity to get a feel for what studying your course would be like
    • chat to current students from your department – the perfect way to find out what student life is like here!
    • view our range of on-campus accommodation and see what life in halls of residence looks like
    • find out about accommodation, finance, student support, study abroad options and career advice
    • go on a campus tour and find out where you will be studying, as well as where you will be socialising!

Even if you have previously attended an open day, we strongly recommend attending an applicant visit day as it provides a very different experience.

When are they taking place?

If you are studying one of our single honours programmes, the dates for your Applicant Visit Day are Saturday 2 February or Wednesday 20 February.

If you are studying a joint honours programme your Applicant Visit is on Saturday 16 March.

How do I book?

There are two ways to book onto your Applicant Visit Day, which you can do shortly after you receive your offer:

  1. Follow the link in the email we sent to confirm your place
  2. We will post you a booking form which you can return (free of charge) and we will process your booking

Subject taster details

BA (Hons) Creative Writing

Saturday 2 February

In this session you will learn all about Microfictions, which are stories which are very short – they include all the key elements crucial for narrative storytelling, they just do their work in brief spaces. You will be focusing on examples from a book called Anthropology by Dan Rhodes, an absurd and surreal comic look at love and relationships. This sample session will give you an idea of the kind of thing you might encounter in your first Fiction class at Edge Hill.

Wednesday 20 February

What do Fairy Liquid and History have in common? In the taster session, you will answer this question through exploring how advertisements can be used as history evidence. The objective of the class is to demonstrate that all cultural products can act as sources of information for some aspect of the period in which they were produced.

BA (Hons) English

Saturday 2 February

This session will explore late-nineteenth-century detective fiction, specifically the Sherlock Holmes stories. It will introduces you to key social and topical elements of detective stories and the language of crime through the study of Forensic Linguistics. The session will also provide an opportunity to participate in a university seminar. It is adapted from actual sessions, so will give a realistic expectation of university-level study in English.

Wednesday 20 February

This session will introduce you to particular issues around the notion of bilingualism and will consider how speakers draw on language to communicate different identities and specific cultural understandings. The session will also provide an opportunity to participate in a university seminar. It is adapted from actual sessions, so will give a realistic expectation of university-level study in English.

BA (Hons) English Language

Saturday 2 February

This session is a practical workshop looking at children’s early lexical production and comprehension. In this class, you will investigate the sorts of words children acquire first before looking at how the pronunciation and comprehension of early words differ from their adult equivalents.

Wednesday 20 February

This session will provide you with a basic introduction to Discourse Analysis: the contextual study of written and spoken language beyond the sentence. Using a mostly interactive approach, we will explore the idea that texts are meaningful, and their meaning (discourse meaning) is more than the addition of the meanings of its component sentences.

BA (Hons) English Literature

Saturday 2 February

In the early nineteenth century enterprising publishers and editors sought to appeal to new audiences and take advantage of increasing literacy rates. Penny fiction emerged in the 1830s and 1840s and met a rapid demand for escapist, entertaining material. But these new texts had a dark, bloody, and gory core. The Penny Dreadful and Penny Blood emerged as a form of entertainment, and told the stories of murder, highwaymen, hauntings, and even cannibalism! This session will introduce students to a key genre in nineteenth-century literature and provide an overview of early commercialisation of criminality.

Wednesday 20 February

Margaret Atwood’s 1996 novel Alias Grace explores the problems of processing and writing event into history. Atwood draws on the story of a double murder that took place in 1843 when a sixteen-year-year-old servant girl, Grace, achieved widespread notoriety for her part in the crime. The novel contains a variety of narrative forms including prison records, newspaper reports, punishment book records, drawings, and ballads to form a patchwork effect that combines with symbolism and story. This session will explore contradictory constructions of Grace’s character and the problems of finding the truth of an historical event.

BA (Hons) History

Saturday 2 February

In this interactive session you will use a range of primary documents to explore the ways in which ‘being British’ has been articulated at different moments in a turbulent period of history. The primary historical documents will include texts, cultural objects, images, films and music, and we will work together to interpret how people thought about their national and other social identities. We will think too about the value of history: How do our historical skills contribute to debates about identity in contemporary Britain? How does such historical research contribute to developing your career after your degree?

Saturday 20 February

What do Fairy Liquid and History have in common? In the taster session, you will answer this question through exploring how advertisements can be used as history evidence. The objective of the class is to demonstrate that all cultural products can act as sources of information for some aspect of the period in which they were produced.

Saturday 16 March

In this session you will use lines from songs as a prompt for writing your own poem or piece of flash fiction, exploring the different ways that you might create those pieces of writing. This sample session will give you an idea of the kind of thing you might encounter in your first few classes at Edge Hill. 

Joint Honours

Creative Writing

  • In this session you’re going to explore writing dialogue that is lively and dynamic. Through practical writing exercises, you’ll be shown how line length, character objectives and subtext can have a positive effect on your dialogue. These fun exercises will give you an idea of the kind of thing you might encounter in your first script class at Edge Hill.

English Language

  • This session will provide you with a basic introduction to studying Language Change, which involves the investigation of developments in grammatical and discourse usage in language. Using a mostly interactive approach, the session will raise awareness of the form that language and communication take within contemporary communication via social media.

English Literature

  • This workshop will explore some of the key significances of Susan Hill’s ghost fictions, with particular focus on the infamous spectral heroine Jennet Humfrye, who haunts the pages of Hill’s original ghost novella, The Woman in Black. The workshop will draw on a range of interactive activities designed to help you make exciting comparisons and contrasts between Hill’s original novella and other texts within this genre.

History

  • What do Fairy Liquid and History have in common? In the taster session, you will answer this question through exploring how advertisements can be used as history evidence. The objective of the class is to demonstrate that all cultural products can act as sources of information for some aspect of the period in which they were produced.